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Old 08-08-2011, 12:48 PM   #21
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

We have a Portland Pudgy Rotomolded dink that comes in at 7'8" and is very stable. With a sail rig it provides a lot of fun in most anchorages. For power it will only handle a 2HP longshaft OB. Rows nicely and has the inside room of an equivalent 9' inflatable. Also have a 9' Livingston which has better real weight capacity and rowing characteristics.*

I'd recommend both, but if anyone is contemplating the Pudgy please PM me for further comments.
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Old 08-08-2011, 12:54 PM   #22
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

I'm am using a 10 ft Livingston with a 9.8 Nissan tilted up on a Sea Wise Davit System on my AT 365.*

Pros: It can be dropped and ready for use in a couple of minutes. The boat is very stable and roomy enough for 4 or 2 plus bikes or supplies. I can stand on one gunnel while the boat is emply and it will not tilt or overturn. It will plane off at about 16 mph with 2 adults aboard. It is unsinkable and has underway draining plugs on both hulls.*Can be used for fishing safely.

Cons: Although it has a rub rail, it might ding*another boat*if not tied off properly.
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Old 08-08-2011, 02:15 PM   #23
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

Tony-- Best dinghy I have seen to date is the Bullfrog. Has the floatation of an inflatable but has solid foam tubes with a tough coating. Since the tubes are not air filled fabric, the Bullfrog has the long life of a hardshell. Also, since the tubes are not inflated fabric they don't have to be round. So the insides are cut straight down which gives a lot more room inside the boat. Powered by a 15 hp motor they zip along very impressively with a good ride thanks to the V-shaped aluminum bottom. Also portions of the foam are cut out to make handy storage compartments inside the "tubes."

We have a Livingston on Weaver Davits on the swimstep, and while it is far superior in my opinion to a finite-lived inflatable or RIB the main drawback of the Livingston is its lack of freeboard when loaded. The larger ones are better in this respect but the 9' model we have has too little freeboard in our opinion. It's not the sort of boat we'd want to trust for a long run from an anchorage to town or in an emergency in rough water. It is, however, a great little shoreboat or for messing about or fishing in relatively protected waters.

The smallest Bullfrog is the 10' model, which is what our friend Carey has on davits on the stern of his lobsterboat. I've been in it a fair amount and was impressed with it from the start. Fast, carries a good load, good ride in choppy water, combines the benefits of an inflatable with the benefits of a hardshell without the drawbacks of either one.

Drawbacks to the Bullfrog is they are not inexpensive and they are fairly heavy. They are made in Bellingham so their availability is great out here. I have no idea what their distribution and dealer networks are like so I have no idea how common or available they are in your area. But when the day comes we are able to take longer cruises up north we will leave the Livingston at home and tow a 10' Bullfrog.
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Old 08-08-2011, 02:51 PM   #24
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

The 10' Bulfrog weighs about 340 lbs more than a similar sized Avon RIB. Weight and worsened stability*for a boat deck mounting would be a concern. With the vessel CG about 9 - 10' below the boat deck --------- topside weight is something to shed, not add. Since I do "big water" trips from time-to-time, I have found about 300 lbs of fly bridge stuff that can be located below.

Good RIBs are tough to beat, all things considered.
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Old 08-08-2011, 03:42 PM   #25
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

Quote:
sunchaser wrote:
...........Good RIBs are tough to beat, all things considered.
*I am starting to lean in that direction.
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Old 08-08-2011, 04:28 PM   #26
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Dinghy - What type?

There is a fellow with a really nice Island Gypsy tri-cabin on our dock and not long ago I noticed to my surprise that he carries a 10' Bullfrog on Weaver-like davits (I don't know if they are actually Weaver, brand--- they look different than ours). This surprised me because a Bullfrog is not light and*his boat has the stock (and probably original) teak-strip swim step. He does not carry the motor on the Bullfrog when it is stowed on the boat. The motor is stowed on a mount attached to the transom of the IG.

I'm not a fan of stowing any sort of dinghy on the boat deck. I have seen a person seriously injured and a main cabin window smashed out during the lowering of a dinghy from the boat deck, and this was in an anchorage with little waves barey giving any motion to the boat.* In an emergency--- say a boat fire where you need to be getting off the boat right now--- lowering a dinghy from the boat deck may not even be possible. Add to this the fact that these sorts of emergencies rarely occur under ideal conditions but at night, in rough water with heavy pitching and rolling, and a dinghy on a boat deck could be virtually useless and may in fact elevate the seriousness of the emergency even more.

I never thought about this aspect of where to carry a dinghy until talking to a long-time cruiser about the Bullfrog he tows behind his boat. He described a few horror stories he'd heard or witnessed over the*years*involving boat-deck carried dingies, and this (and common sense) convinced me that it's a bad place to carry a dinghy. Better on davits on the stern-- of which there are a number of types and configurations to carry the dinghy either vertically on its side or hung horizontally-- or towed if the waters one cruises in are condusive to that.

But if we are ever in the position to have a boat with a "boat deck," like the GB36 Europa we looked over this weekend, we would never carry a dinghy up there. The weight issue Tom described is certainly one consideration, but more important to me is the fact we want our dinghy carried in such a way that it can be in the water almost instantly should the need arise. So for us, stern davits or towed are the only choices we will consider.


-- Edited by Marin on Monday 8th of August 2011 04:32:05 PM
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Old 08-08-2011, 04:58 PM   #27
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

We have always tried to get the biggest dinghy that will fit the boat.* It's our (your) car.* We provision with it, get fuel, fish out of it and sight see.* It is not uncommon to have to travel several miles*for provisions in less than ideal conditions.* We had to rescue a fellow cruiser*who got caught in a squall on the way back to his boat.* He had a hard rowing dinghy and was being swept out of the anchorage.**He fortunately had a hand held VHF and was able to call for help.*

We have a 10.5' RIB with a 15 hp 2 stroke currently.* It will get up on a plane with 4 average adults and with Lena, Morgan and I, we can travel comfortably at planing speeds.* I think a lot of it comes down to what you are going to do with your "car" and the area that you cruise in.
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Old 08-08-2011, 05:02 PM   #28
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

Quote:
Marin wrote:Better on davits on the stern-- of which there are a number of types and configurations to carry the dinghy either vertically on its side or hung horizontally-- or towed if the waters one cruises in are condusive to that [emphasis added].

But if we are ever in the position to have a boat with a "boat deck," like the GB36 Europa we looked over this weekend, we would never carry a dinghy up there. The weight issue Tom described is certainly one consideration, but more important to me is the fact we want our dinghy carried in such a way that it can be in the water almost instantly should the need arise. So for us, stern davits or towed are the only choices we will consider.
I agree completely.

We tow because our waters are relatively sheltered and our boat is a sheltered water coastal cruiser in any event and that is the type of cruising we do (if we don't get caught out, which we have been).

I would prefer to do a Seawise type arrangement when and if finances allow as towing has inherent risks and inconveniences, although we have had no problem in 25 years of towing (so far).

Our boat has enough weight aloft and does not need a heavy dinghy up there.

But paramount in my thinking is the ability to abandon the boat quickly and safely into the "lifeboat".
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Old 08-08-2011, 06:10 PM   #29
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

Provided your vessel's boat deck and CG**is designed and calculated properly, I'm not concerned about the need for the dinghy*to be*used as a liferaft. I have a liferaft for that purpose. That said, vessels less than 40' probably best use davits. But davits and big stern seas*can be*a poor mix.

On some vessels, such as the Tolly 43 and 48 and the aft cabin GBs and 36/40 Selenes, the boat deck is perfect for stability and designed to be so. Towing is a poor option for blue water work - I betcha more towed dinghys have been lost or props fouled than have been*needed as liferafts.

I perused the 65' Fleming "Venture" (Tony's boat) this past week in Ganges. It has traveled*the world with its dinghy on the boat deck. Nordhavns, Dashews FPBs*and Krogens too!

But, why tempt fate, go with the lightest dinghy you can. In big seas you can stow your outboard in the lazz or on deck to lower the CG. My RIB alone is only 130 lbs + 21/2 gal fuel vs 490 lbs for the Bullfrog.
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Old 08-08-2011, 06:16 PM   #30
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

surprised no one suggested a Boston Whaler, comes in variety of sizes and configurations.
could definitively be mounted on davits in the plain configuration.

we recently got ourselves into a decent size RIB, it is not only a fun toy but is very stable in the water due the deep V.
it is too heavy for us to davit mount, so it will be a tow..
(could not afford the Boston Whaler btw)
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Old 08-08-2011, 06:46 PM   #31
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

Given the very high prices of good inflatables/RIBs these days, I cannot come up with any rationale for spending that kind of money for a finite-lived object. If I had a dollar for every uninflated, sagging, weatherbeaten, leaking inflatable or RIB I see on boats in our marina I could proably afford to buy Tony Fleming's Fleming :-)

This is why the Bullfrog is so appealing to me. All the buoyancy, stability, freeboard, and speed advantages of an RIB in a boat that will last forever, or at least last as long as I would ever need it to last. To me, the Bullfrog has rendered RIB's to being yesterday's solution.

Now if you actually need to deflate and stow a dingy for space reasons or whatever, sure, an inflatable is the answer. And if fabric dinghies cost a fraction of something like a Bullfrog, that would make them a more viable alternative to me. But they don't. They cost an arm and a leg and I'm not willing to pay that for something that in a few years I'll be fighting air leaks and patching and worrying about tearing the fabric on those oyster shells and barnacles as I pull the thing up onto the shore.

Tony B--- Your query about Boston Whaler is well founded, I think. I do see them used a lot as tenders, and have known people who had them. Excellent boats, no question. But they tend to be larger than is practical to carry on something like a 36' cruiser. I do see people with cruisers our size towing them, however. Towing is very practical and popular in our inside waters in the PNW, BC, and SE Alaska (as just about every sailboater will tell you). New Whalers are pretty pricey. On the plus side, since they are hardshell they last pretty much forever and so can often be found used at very reasonable prices if you aren't hung up cosmetics.

And there are plenty of other hardshell dinghy options, too, from the inexpensive Walker Bay to "proper" rowing skiffs and everything in between. Even the lowly Livingston is a great shoreboat as long as one is aware of its limitations, particularly in the smaller sizes.

There was another interesting dinghy along the lines of the Bullfrog but made of fiberglass called the Boss Boat. They are/were made in Florida but I've only seen one or two of them out here. I seem to recall they are now out of business, but they, too, combined the advantages of the harshell and the RIB without the disadvantages or either one. I've never been in one so have no firsthand knowledge of their quality and characteristics as I do the Bullfrog, but I've read a lot of good things about them in the past.
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Old 08-08-2011, 07:46 PM   #32
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

Perhaps this might suit although it is all the way from Australia...

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Old 08-08-2011, 08:15 PM   #33
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

I am rather fond of the Portebote. Folds up out of the way, accepts a 2 - 3hp motor that will move it along well, indestructible, too butt ugly to steal. What more could you ask for? We're on our second, with the first dragged over a lot of coral and rocks, and the second a lot of rocks.
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Old 08-08-2011, 09:57 PM   #34
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

Quote:
Marin wrote:
Given the very high prices of good inflatables/RIBs these days, I cannot come up with any rationale for spending that kind of money for a finite-lived object. If I had a dollar for every uninflated, sagging, weatherbeaten, leaking inflatable or RIB I see on boats in our marina I could proably afford to buy Tony Fleming's Fleming :-)

*If my AVON had not come with the boat, I probably wouldn't have an inflatable.* BUT, the thing is 24 years old and still*going strong.* Has been kept under cover when not being used, so sun exposure has been minimal.* The fabric and workmanship in 1987 might explain part of its durability as well.

So last year, I went shopping and could not find the courage (or money) to purchase a new inflatable/outboard.* Ended up with a new outboard, and put it on the old hull.* Should be good for another __ years?
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Old 08-08-2011, 10:20 PM   #35
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

I agree Carl. Portabotes are great but I'd not want to take one to the yacht club. How does one unfold them at anchor? I have visions of putting one across the gunn'ls in the stern and sliding it over the side on the caprails. It could store it hn my seldom used port side deck.
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Old 08-08-2011, 10:56 PM   #36
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

Quote:
nomadwilly wrote:
I agree Carl. Portabotes are great but I'd not want to take one to the yacht club. How does one unfold them at anchor? I have visions of putting one across the gunn'ls in the stern and sliding it over the side on the caprails. It could store it hn my seldom used port side deck.
*We carried one on a 28' Albin we had folded up on the the cabin top.* It was a bit of a tussle, but we could put it together easily enough on the back deck.* What I really like about them is that you can assemble them and tow them 2' away from the sten on the uplife of the stern wave.* If you slow down and they bump, who cares?* It's like getting a Tupperware container thrown at you.* When they are that close, you just forget them, and I hate towing tenders, but never have the slightest qualm about towing the PB, as long as it is sucked up tight.

Practical trumps beauty, so screw the yacht club.
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Old 08-08-2011, 11:52 PM   #37
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

So, 37 posts later do we agree it's horses for courses?

Except of course unless you have this set up.
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Old 08-09-2011, 05:56 AM   #38
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

Here is our 10' 4' Caribe with the four grand children on board.* One grandson is 6'4" and the other 6'5".* Plenty of room, comfortable sitting on the large tubes, bow locker, under seat storage bag,* It really gets up and moves with 15 HP.* Its great for running into the deserted beaches and snorkeling in the Bahamas.* Not for everyone, but it works for us.

*
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Old 08-09-2011, 09:29 AM   #39
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

Quote:
nomadwilly wrote:
*I could store it in my seldom used port side deck.
******* Eric:* This is just a wild guess but are you left handed?
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Old 08-09-2011, 09:41 AM   #40
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RE: Dinghy - What type?

Walt,

No I'm right handed. Why on earth do you ask that?

Shrimp,

What are you talknig about???

Don,

It does look like it's working for you (the kids at least) but how can you say it's roomy when 60% of the boat is air tube?
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