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Old 04-25-2013, 07:04 PM   #1
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Dinghy Oars

We are in the process of ordering a 10' Livingston dinghy for Blue Sky, and will also need to source a set of oars. Livingston says it needs 7' oars so that is a start.

But beyond that, we have never actually purchased oars before, as whatever dinghy we had always came supplied. So perhaps there is an opportunity to do better?

We primarily row around the quiet coves in either exploration mode or get to shore mode; no long distance rowing particularly.

Any thoughts on a good set of oars? Birch? Spruce? Aluminum? Carbon fibre?

Good makes?
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Old 04-25-2013, 07:28 PM   #2
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Old 04-25-2013, 08:05 PM   #3
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Spruce.

Conrad,
Since you're going to row a lot you should consider a rowboat. Like or similar Mark's Trinka. Look at "The Dinghy Co." In Mt Vernon WA. They are inexpensive FG dinghies. I've purchased two from him. All of his boats are molded from old boats w a very special forum. My last boat from Earl was the best rowboat (for 10') that I've ever rowed. I had a 7' dinghy from Earl too. It was excellent rowing too. His web site is poor. PM me w questions.

Re the oars spend $125 to 200.00. Talk to people at the wooden Boat Ctr in Lake Union for sources. I think there are some high grade oars made in the lower mainland or on the island.

If you decide to get a good rowboat get cheap oars to give away w the Livingston when the time comes. You should get your money back and have some oars now. Too short would be better than too long for the Livingston. The Livingston is best powered.
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Old 04-25-2013, 09:12 PM   #4
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I just went through this when trying to get some oars for an aluminum skiff I had in the early 80s, then loaned to a friend for some 20+ years, and now have given it to a co-worker who just bought a house on a lake. Spent a lot of time hunting the web for formulas for determining oar length.

There are several formulas. The easiest one is half the length of the boat. Then there is twice the beam plus 6 inches.

A more complicated formula is the Shaw and Tenney Oar Length Formula. The inboard length of the loom equals the span between the oarlocks + 2" The total length of oar equals 1/7 of inboard length multiplied by 25 The leverage ratio from this forumla is 7:18.

A rough rule of thumb is the faster you want to go the longer the oars should be (up to a practical limit).

The oars we have for both our 9' Livingston and the Montgomery Sailing/Rowing dinghy are spruce. Spruce is the best wood for most oar applications. For racing or rowing heavy boats hard ash is considered the better wood.
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Old 04-25-2013, 09:38 PM   #5
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Conrad,

I am using 7 ft wooden oars on my 10 ft Livingston and they work well for me. I stow them attached with rubber strap-downs fastened to the inside of the starboard hull, so they will always be in the boat and ready for use. You can see the strap-downs in this picture and purchase them at West Marine.

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Old 04-26-2013, 12:23 AM   #6
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www.barkleysoundoar.com

Pretty much every good marine store has them on the island. They're made in Qualicum Beach, B.C. I've got a set for my Minto and would recommend them.
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Old 04-26-2013, 07:09 AM   #7
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AS a rowed dink can easily be "borrowed" the question of how to secure the boat needs to be addressed.

There are simple locking devices that require a 1/2 in hole thru the seat and then drop over the oars and is locked below with a KEYED lock.

A combination lock is fine till sunset then a big PIA .

Edison Oar-lock 523-2 is an expensive 2 piece version. The cast iron Chinese version works almost as well.

Find aluminum oar locks that can be fitted with a short chain and a crossbar .

If the oarlock is accidentally lifted the chain and crossbar will keep it in the dink (usefull coming alongside too).

It is easy to line up the crossbar and remove the oar lock and take it with you .

With locked oars , and no oarlocks the dink will usually be where you left it.

UNLESS you tie up with a very short painter and block access for other boaters.

About 20 ft of tie up line is fine.
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Old 04-26-2013, 09:22 AM   #8
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We got a 6'6" pair of Sawyer oars for our 9+ foot Avon Redcrest about 13 years ago. They made all the difference in the world compared to the tiny supplied oars. Really like the quality, and the covered handles.

http://www.paddlesandoars.com/Oars/SAWYER-UTILITY-OAR/

Used Shaw and Tenney's formula to help decide length.
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Old 04-26-2013, 11:17 AM   #9
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Not having a dink or a pair of oars, this thread amazes me!
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Old 04-30-2013, 12:13 PM   #10
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[QUOTE=FF;152356]AS a rowed dink can easily be "borrowed" the question of how to secure the boat needs to be addressed.

There are simple locking devices that require a 1/2 in hole thru the seat and then drop over the oars and is locked below with a KEYED lock

---Great Idea---
Security Oar Holder Wilcox Crittenden

Just picked up one of these for my Shaw and Tennys.

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Old 04-30-2013, 05:54 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FF View Post
There are simple locking devices that require a 1/2 in hole thru the seat and then drop over the oars and is locked below with a KEYED lock.
My new Trinka came with such a device and hole-in-the-seat, but I need to purchase the lock.

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Old 04-30-2013, 06:01 PM   #12
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Greetings,
Dem's not oars, dem's me wife and daughters...
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Old 04-30-2013, 06:13 PM   #13
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"My new Trinka came with such a device and hole-in-the-seat, but I need to purchase the lock."

Mark --Love the Trinka--Now I do not feel so bad about drilling a hole in the seat of my 1987 Dyer Dhow! Going to try the no motor thing too.

Take Care John
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Old 04-30-2013, 07:00 PM   #14
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Mark --Love the Trinka--Now I do not feel so bad about drilling a hole in the seat of my 1987 Dyer Dhow! Going to try the no motor thing too.
Place the hole as far as practical to one side, opposite the side one normally boards.
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Old 04-30-2013, 08:21 PM   #15
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... my 1987 Dyer Dhow!
Is it a 9 footer? I want one.
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Old 04-30-2013, 09:06 PM   #16
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"Place the hole as far as practical to one side, opposite the side one normally boards."

Good Tip-- No sense climbing over the oars!
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Old 04-30-2013, 09:10 PM   #17
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Dave, It is a nine footer. Never would have heard of the Shaw and Tenny oars, except for this thread. Then went to pick up the dinghy and it came with a pair in perfect condition.

It made my day. JohnP
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