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Old 12-01-2014, 06:56 PM   #21
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IMHO davits are always more convenient and the preferred tender solution.

Lower looks better (from someone else's boat), but can you see your stern well enough for close quarters manouvering?.

OTH high is much safer at sea and you can see your stern, but the general view aft may be not so good.
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Old 12-01-2014, 07:15 PM   #22
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Btw, the Whaler tows beautifully. We did order it with bow rails and a tow eye. You should be aware that the bow ring on a Whaler is for hauling it onto a trailer and if you try to tow it by that ring it will eventually tear out of the hull. We ordered our 110 Sport model from the factory with a towing eye specifically. It is glassed into the hull and heavily backed for the intended purpose of towing. Purchasers of a used Whaler should be sure it has a tow eye before attempting to tow it.

I am curious to know if it is best to tow with the motor down or up. Any thoughts on this? Howard
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Old 12-01-2014, 07:30 PM   #23
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Thanks Larry looks good . I like the lower one also . You surprised me I didn't know that you were going to work on the transom mounted davits .
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Old 12-01-2014, 07:44 PM   #24
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Wouldn't both of those options block most of your view to stern from the helm though?
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Old 12-01-2014, 08:07 PM   #25
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Wouldn't both of those options block most of your view to stern from the helm though?
I'm thinking I could lower the dinghy height flush with the cap rail
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Old 12-01-2014, 09:17 PM   #26
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Here's a couple on e-bay that come in three sections. It says nothing about the reach, but if you wanted to just use the upper most sections to mount on your cap rail, maybe...

Boaters’ Resale Shop of TX 1409 2774 01 Pair of Edson Davits | eBay
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Old 12-01-2014, 10:37 PM   #27
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I am curious to know if it is best to tow with the motor down or up. Any thoughts on this? Howard
The few people I know or have met who tow a dinghy with motors on them behind their powerboats lock the motors up.
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Old 12-01-2014, 10:42 PM   #28
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We tow our CC with motor up.
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Old 12-02-2014, 01:59 AM   #29
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How about...?
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Old 12-02-2014, 02:41 AM   #30
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Ha! Now there's fast deploy.
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Old 12-02-2014, 04:41 AM   #31
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Comments on davits: Upside, no need to put the dinghy on the upper deck, usually cheaper than a crane. Downside, lengthens boat and in many marinas requires larger slip/ higher slip fees. Many people feel not appropriate/safe underway in open water, especially if you lower the storage height in order to see out the helm. Sight to the rear is always a problem, especially if you are backing into a slip.

I have known two trawlers who have used davits for convenience but who have raised the dinghy to the upper deck for passages.

If you are looking at a dinghy crane, consider Nick Jackson's bent pipe crane. Doesn't lower but it looks like in your situation you don't need to have it lowered to the deck because you will have the "boom" stored over the dinghy.

Suggest if you store the dinghy on the top deck you put in lifelines as well.
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Old 12-02-2014, 04:00 PM   #32
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Wouldn't both of those options block most of your view to stern from the helm though?
Here's my compromise.

I can see the stern for close manouvering, but the middle distance view is cluttered.

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And yep, the davits plus bow sprit add 10ft to LOA - marinas are more than happy to charge extra.
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Old 12-02-2014, 04:37 PM   #33
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Hmmmmm...

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Old 12-02-2014, 08:33 PM   #34
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You know, I can't say that something like this hasn't occurred to me for building on my own vessel, but the amount of leverage on that arm would require something pretty substantial and $$$$ to build, like Titanium or Carbon Fiber to keep it light. I dunno, maybe a large rectangular gusseted aluminum? Not to mention, the axis point on the hull. Now something with an arm on each side would be a lot easier and cheaper to design and configure, but these things are so much better received on larger vessels. Interesting idea, though.

As for John's example above (Eagle 419), I think I could live with that mid-range blockage vs. the other options. Great looking boat there, John.
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Old 12-02-2014, 08:51 PM   #35
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You know, I can't say that something like this hasn't occurred to me for building on my own vessel, but the amount of leverage on that arm would require something pretty substantial and $$$$ to build, like Titanium or Carbon Fiber to keep it light. I dunno, maybe a large rectangular gusseted aluminum? Not to mention, the axis point on the hull. Now something with an arm on each side would be a lot easier and cheaper to design and configure, but these things are so much better received on larger vessels. Interesting idea, though.

As for John's example above (Eagle 419), I think I could live with that mid-range blockage vs. the other options. Great looking boat there, John.
But then you also need the Swim Platform, with integrated diving board, to enter the dinghy.

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Old 12-02-2014, 09:34 PM   #36
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Lot of options here . I probably have about 4 ft of freeboard at the transom . The dinghy is about 1-1/2 ft from keel to caprail . I might could get by with top of the dinghy riding about 1 ft above caprail on the transom .
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Old 12-02-2014, 10:24 PM   #37
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Everyone has their own preferences and operational procedures and comfort zones. Our 9' Livingston is carried on its side on the swimstep of our boat and sticks up above deck level. Plus we have a tri-cabin which restricts rearward vision even more. Plus our largest window to the rear from the main cabin and helm station is mostly blocked by the sailing dinghy we carry on the aft cabin top.

So our view to the rear is pretty severely hampered, although I can lean out the cabin door next to the helm and look back down the starboard deck.

But we have never had any difficulty judging our distances or stern position when we are backing or maneuvering. I think it's like driving a car or truck. You learn the sight picture fairly quickly and then just "know" when you are clearing the things around you in tight situations or aren't going to.

Our friends with the lobsterboat we're rafted to in the photo below are the same way. He can judge by what he sees out the rear bulkhead door and cabin windows (or the open door) where his dingy is in relation to what's around him. So far as I know, he's never had a problem shoehorning his boat into tight spaces.
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Old 12-03-2014, 06:29 AM   #38
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If the transom were lower to the water , and built to fold down (like a pickup truck tailgate) to work as the swim platform , the dink could simply be driven aboard as the Seal Combat teams do. Great for loading or unloading , elderly access , and instantly ready for launching. Would be harder to steal too . Rollers might be needed on the inner face of the tailgate.
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Old 12-03-2014, 08:06 AM   #39
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To think about when towing motor up/down...

There's not too much drag down for all but the bigger tenders and faster speeds. Some, for maneuvering, motor down has enough drag the dink stays behind better without wandering. There is some wear on the lower bearings but no more than if the dink motor was running anyway.

Motor up has issues if the transom is not strong enough to support the leverage if the dink is hitting a lot of chop. Check you manual to see what the manufacturer recommends for road trailering. Some have adequate trailering support, not sure if all do now.
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Old 12-03-2014, 08:45 AM   #40
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That's good advice. I will check it out. Thanks Howard
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