Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-15-2012, 10:37 AM   #21
Guru
 
ben2go's Avatar
 
City: Upstate,SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: The Caroliner
Vessel Model: Plans to build 30' Spira Sitka
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 1,080
Quote:
Originally Posted by twiisted71 View Post
If you are building a boat with a flat stern you can stow it standing on its stern. Run a pulley to the trailing edge of your cabin roof and use a small trailer winch or block and tackle to pull the bow up into position. Kills your rearward view but will allow you to use the dink you already have and would be EASY to launch in pretty much any conditions esp if it really only weighs #100! As for your swim platform you can make it with a hinged center section to allow for those times you need to trim the outdrive completely out of the water.

If I build one of those designs I mentioned,it will come in under 100#.My outdrive will come thru the transom right in the center of the swim platform,maybe a little higher,in the down position.I am planning to build twin swim platforms that have angled sides to allow for the sweep of the outdrive.

As far as those fold up porta boats go, I'd consider them an item for a RV/tent camper that wants to be able to paddle around a lake at a campsite. The sterns are SUPER flimsy unless you build some bracing (essentially make a plywood cutout the same shape as the entire stern) and then its still not going to be something you'd want to have your trip's enjoyment depend on. 'Twould suck being off on a weeklong excursion and have one of the flexible seam/hinges tear or separate.

I have been getting mixed reviews from other people I have talked to about Porta Boats.I only plan to use a dink when I do the Loop and have to anchor or moor.With the shallow draft that my boat will have,I have no issues jumping the rail and wading to shore.I'll have to plan that around the tides.I may leave myself high and wet with a long swim back to the boat.
That's my idear anyway.
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
BEN'S BOAT BLOG

ben2go is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2012, 11:44 AM   #22
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailor of Fortune View Post
I would not want a trinka for a general purpose dinghy. They are beautiful and all that but round bottom boats are a pita as tenders.
I can confirm that from direct experience. Our boat came with a lovely Montgomery sailing dinghy in a cradle on the aft cabin top. Great little boat to row or sail but absolutely horrible as a shoreboat. Not only did it require the use of the boom to launch and retrieve, a time-consuming process, but for two adults, let alone the dog, it was way too unstable, tricky to get into and out of unless it was beached, and had a minimal carrying capacity.

We put up with it for about four months and then added a Livingston on the stern. The Livingston's ugly but it's extremely stable, it's easy to get in and out of even when the water is choppy, and it has a lot of interior space. While we won't buy a fabric boat, the same can be said for a decent inflatable/RIB.

We kept the Montgomery because it's a fun little boat to sail and it makes a great and very aesthetic place to stow the crab pot, dinghy motor fuel, etc. But we would never recommend a round-bottomed boat as being a good choice for a shore or utility boat.
__________________

Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2012, 02:49 PM   #23
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,262
Regardless, the Trinka has a beautiful bottom.



Probably why it tows and rows well.
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2012, 08:29 AM   #24
Veteran Member
 
Carl Martin's Avatar
 
City: Hudson
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Olive Oyl
Vessel Model: Scout 30
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 39
A timeless design that anyone with an eye for beauty would be proud to own.
Carl Martin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2012, 09:06 AM   #25
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,892
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Martin View Post
A timeless design that anyone with an eye for beauty would be proud to own.
True...but at the bottom of the list for a utility dink.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2012, 09:43 AM   #26
Veteran Member
 
Carl Martin's Avatar
 
City: Hudson
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Olive Oyl
Vessel Model: Scout 30
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 39
One might rethink that when the outboard for your plastic barge or gray balloon won't start & your life depends on getting to shore.
Carl Martin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2012, 10:00 AM   #27
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,892
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Martin View Post
One might rethink that when the outboard for your plastic barge or gray balloon won't start & your life depends on getting to shore.
Really? Never thunk that after 40 years of crusi'n..

All of the dinks I have/had oars that do just fine (been rowing for 50 years plus competative) so I know what a good "rowboat is. Also have had so many friends wind up nearly drowning from similar round bottom dinks. Most people with round bottom dinks get rid of them to get a real utility dink...never the other way around...unless they started out with one even worse than a round bottomed one no matter how nice they look....
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2012, 11:39 AM   #28
Guru
 
skipperdude's Avatar
 
City: Whittier AK
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Apache II
Vessel Model: 1974 Donald Jones
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,147
If you carry it on the roof.
Make sure the drain is open or the cover is rain proof.
Or carry it upside down.

A dink full of water sure can weigh a bunch.

SD
__________________
If you can't repair it maybe it shouldn't be on the boat
skipperdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2012, 01:27 PM   #29
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Martin View Post
One might rethink that when the outboard for your plastic barge or gray balloon won't start & your life depends on getting to shore.
Not true, I think. Our wide, square Livingston actually rows very well. In fact we used it for a year this way with no complaints at all until we decided to put a motor on it. Not because it was hard to row but because after getting "caught" in a current one day while rowing to shore we realized that with the swift currents around here we should have a motor so if we did need to buck or cross a current we'd have the speed to do so. The motor is not large--- a Yamaha 4hp 4-stroke--- but it will move the Livingston fast enough to overcome the typical currents we are likely to encounter. So we powered the Livingston as a safety measure, not to overcome any sort of rowing difficulty.

Does it row as well as the Montgomery dinghy on the cabin top? Of course not. But it rows just fine for utility and shore work.

The GB36 we chartered before buying our own boat had an 8 or 9 foot RIB on the swimstep. It had a motor on a transom bracket but we never used it. The inflatable rowed just fine. I've never tried rowing a big one so perhaps they're a different story.
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2012, 02:37 PM   #30
TF Site Team
 
Larry M's Avatar
 
City: JAX, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Hobo
Vessel Model: Krogen 42-120
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 5,734
Quote:
... I've never tried rowing a big one so perhaps they're a different story.
One of the issues the grey balloons () have are the oars. We had an 11.5 foot Avon roll up with an inflatable floor. We got rid of the 2-piece aluminum oars and replaced them with properly sized one-piece wooden oars. It rowed fine, though not like a rowing dinghy. We could row anywhere if we didn't want to mess with the outboard.
Larry M is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2012, 05:21 PM   #31
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,892
Even a decent dory would be better than a trinka, etc....dories row well and carry a ton with increasing stability the more you put into it and can carry an outboard too.

I'm not saying I wouldn't mind a big pulling boat like a lifeguard boat that rows well and can carry a load to boot...not happening till I buy my 75 footer..

....but in small sizes...EVERYONE I know with real cruising experience ditches the cutsie tenders.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2012, 05:28 PM   #32
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,892
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
Not true, I think. Our wide, square Livingston actually rows very well. In fact we used it for a year this way with no complaints at all until we decided to put a motor on it. Not because it was hard to row but because after getting "caught" in a current one day while rowing to shore we realized that with the swift currents around here we should have a motor so if we did need to buck or cross a current we'd have the speed to do so. The motor is not large--- a Yamaha 4hp 4-stroke--- but it will move the Livingston fast enough to overcome the typical currents we are likely to encounter. So we powered the Livingston as a safety measure, not to overcome any sort of rowing difficulty.

Does it row as well as the Montgomery dinghy on the cabin top? Of course not. But it rows just fine for utility and shore work.

The GB36 we chartered before buying our own boat had an 8 or 9 foot RIB on the swimstep. It had a motor on a transom bracket but we never used it. The inflatable rowed just fine. I've never tried rowing a big one so perhaps they're a different story.
All inflatables require a different rowing technique...a shorter choppier stroke than a long slow pull...ok settle down some of you...

Even the big ones will row OK ...but the really big ones do have a lot of windage to manage.

If I ever feel the need to have a vessel that is human powered to save my boat or my life...I'll have a small kayak to do the dirty work. The dink is the pickup truck of cruising and needs to be way more versitile than just rowable.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2012, 06:05 PM   #33
Veteran Member
 
Carl Martin's Avatar
 
City: Hudson
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Olive Oyl
Vessel Model: Scout 30
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 39
I bought my first Avon Redcrest in the early 80's & have had a couple more of different sizes since then. I've rowed them all alot & I never want to row one into a strong head wind. A real anchor to keep you from being blown away is necessary safety equipement for an inflatable. I'm normally not a fan of analogies but here's one, comparing rowing my 11' Avon to my 10' Bauer is like comparing running up hill to ice skating.
Carl Martin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2012, 06:14 PM   #34
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,892
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Martin View Post
I bought my first Avon Redcrest in the early 80's & have had a couple more of different sizes since then. I've rowed them all alot & I never want to row one into a strong head wind. A real anchor to keep you from being blown away is necessary safety equipement for an inflatable. I'm normally not a fan of analogies but here's one, comparing rowing my 11' Avon to my 10' Bauer is like comparing running up hill to ice skating.
And I can stand on the side of an Avon Redcrest with an 8D battery in my arms and the dink doesn't even know it...what's your point?

That outboards are unreliable? Learn to keep them running so they don't fail when you need them. Can't row an Avon inflatable?...learn the technique it ain't that hard.

Ever fall out of a round bottomed dink when trying to pass an ear of corn to another boat? No???...well plenty of experienced cruisers have.

If you like rowing dinks great...like anchors there's lots of opinions and realities. Rowing is just ONE of many characteristics a dink may or may not have...but it isn't number one to many cruisers.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2012, 06:50 PM   #35
Veteran Member
 
Carl Martin's Avatar
 
City: Hudson
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Olive Oyl
Vessel Model: Scout 30
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 39
Having cruised many miles with a Redcrest, which was a great dinghy, I'd recommend having someone on the other side of the boat with maybe a generator or refrigerator to balance that out. Barring that I'd strongly recommend letting go of the battery when you hit bottom. Regarding the dangers of passing corn from one dinghy to another that is clearly an example of why it's so dangerous to eat & row at the same time.
Carl Martin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2012, 06:53 PM   #36
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,892
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Martin View Post
Having cruised many miles with a Redcrest, which was a great dinghy, I'd recommend having someone on the other side of the boat with maybe a generator or refrigerator to balance that out. Barring that I'd strongly recommend letting go of the battery when you hit bottom. Regarding the dangers of passing corn from one dinghy to another that is clearly an example of why it's so dangerous to eat & row at the same time.
proving my point?
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2012, 08:24 PM   #37
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,262
Trinka with "dinghy dogs":

__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2012, 08:27 PM   #38
Veteran Member
 
Carl Martin's Avatar
 
City: Hudson
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Olive Oyl
Vessel Model: Scout 30
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 39
Anyone remember the Pardeys?
Carl Martin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2012, 08:53 PM   #39
Guru
 
Conrad's Avatar
 
City: Calgary
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Blue Sky
Vessel Model: Nordic Tugs 42 Hull #001
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,553
Lin & Larry? They cruised forever in a 24' sailboat (eventually upgrading to a 30 footer), but apparently they themselves are quite tiny.
__________________
Conrad
Berthed in
Campbell River BC
Conrad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2012, 09:12 PM   #40
Veteran Member
 
Carl Martin's Avatar
 
City: Hudson
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Olive Oyl
Vessel Model: Scout 30
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 39
They cruised all over the world with a Fatty Knees & always espoused the importance of a dinghy that rows well. However, they eventually added something like the dinghy dogs to their row boat having succumbed to the realization that without them they would never be able to stand on the gunnel. It broke my heart.
__________________

Carl Martin is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012