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Old 02-12-2011, 09:38 AM   #1
Rob
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Another Dinghy Towing Question

I really don't like to tow a dinghy and know first hand the dangers of doing so.
My question is: Has anyone developed a "Retractable Dinghy Tow Line"? What I have in mind is a device similar to a "Retractable Dog Leash" When I slow down or stop*the boat the dinghy would automatically be pulled out of harms way.
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Old 02-12-2011, 09:40 AM   #2
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RE: Another Dinghy Towing Question

Its called a "wife". handy for other purposes too.
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Old 02-12-2011, 10:28 AM   #3
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RE: Another Dinghy Towing Question

Quote:
Rob wrote:

I really don't like to tow a dinghy and know first hand the dangers of doing so.
My question is: Has anyone developed a "Retractable Dinghy Tow Line"? What I have in mind is a device similar to a "Retractable Dog Leash" When I slow down or stop*the boat the dinghy would automatically be pulled out of harms way.
Yes, there was one on the market a few years ago. However, my recent Google search found only a patent for one. My guess is that they were expensive and did not sell. Too bad, as it would would be a great way to go if you don't have your wife along to pull it in.

*
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Old 02-12-2011, 11:02 AM   #4
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RE: Another Dinghy Towing Question

you could try something like this:

http://www.ultimatewasher.com/heavy-duty-hose-reels.htm

Even when single handing, it really is not too much trouble to pull the dink in by myself.* As I only trail out 20 feet or so of line it only takes a few seconds to pull it up close to*the transom for docking or other close manuervering.

Also, it is just a few steps to the cockpit from the pilothouse on my boat

When the admiral is aboard, this is her chore.
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Old 02-12-2011, 11:30 AM   #5
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Another Dinghy Towing Question

Carey- I don't want to step on my own foot but I would like to quote you:

Too bad, as it would would be a great way to go if you don't have your wife along to pull it in.

*"The biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place."
Sometimes when we are maneuvering around in close quarters such as at anchor when we need to reset the anchor I am probably the one who is poorly communicating! You can be moving forward at a snails pace, tap it into reverse and as quickly as that you have a line and dink in the prop! At least this is what I have been told. Ha!

Rob Hays
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La Conner, Wa./Girdwood,Ak.
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-- Edited by Rob on Saturday 12th of February 2011 12:31:30 PM
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Old 02-12-2011, 11:37 AM   #6
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RE: Another Dinghy Towing Question

you could put floats on the tow line so it wont sink???
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Old 02-12-2011, 12:24 PM   #7
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Another Dinghy Towing Question

My experience has proven that you can easily and quickly get a floating tow line in the prop. Maybe a corked line would have prevented this incident but I sort of doubt it. Our boat being a double ender has a very rounded stern thus allowing a line to slip beneath the surface veryeasily. I don't want to go into great detail about this incident other then to say the skiff was cut loose and retrieved later, had this tow line been nylon or Dacron I would have had a few more problems. I have a good collection of boating trophies from years of fun on the water. Do You?

-- Edited by Rob on Saturday 12th of February 2011 01:28:34 PM
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Old 02-12-2011, 12:34 PM   #8
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RE: Another Dinghy Towing Question

Rob I been playing with the idea of sort of a Y tow bar that connects to the stern/swim step the *dink could be pulled tight up in to or let out, *Sort of like the front of a trailer made out of 2x2 aluminum with roller guides. **If would have an electric winch power in and out so you could have a remote control.* Muabe you can plan with it and we can get together.I *will mod one up with 2"X2: wood first and*when*idea design proven have the plant*have make one.


*
I know another one of Phil/Fill crazy ideas!****
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Old 02-12-2011, 12:53 PM   #9
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RE: Another Dinghy Towing Question

P/F- Your too late, that's already been built. These things are on tons of boats in SE Alaska:
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Old 02-12-2011, 01:13 PM   #10
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RE: Another Dinghy Towing Question

I was think of having it right up close to the swim platform so the bow fits in the Y.* More like a trailer receiver that could be taken on off by pulling a pin.**Like you have show except*back wards and not*as long.*** Somthing like towing a car behind an RV.*

Do what*are you think of?
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Old 02-12-2011, 04:06 PM   #11
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RE: Another Dinghy Towing Question

Quote:
bshanafelt wrote:Even when single handing, it really is not too much trouble to pull the dink in by myself.* As I only trail out 20 feet or so of line it only takes a few seconds to pull it up close to*the transom for docking or other close manuervering.

Also, it is just a few steps to the cockpit from the pilothouse on my boat

When the admiral is aboard, this is her chore.
This is the way we do it, although we share the job depending upon who is at the helm. And we tow on about a 40' line. In 25 years of towing a dinghy in the type of reasonably protected waters we cruise in, we have yet to have a problem (knock on wood).

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Old 02-12-2011, 06:11 PM   #12
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RE: Another Dinghy Towing Question

Kiss principle fellas. Retractable dodads and other gimmicks will fail when needed most.
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Old 02-12-2011, 09:46 PM   #13
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RE: Another Dinghy Towing Question

Quote:
capt jerry wrote:

you could put floats on the tow line so it wont sink???
I'm with you Capt JerryI towed for several years without eating my towline, but even with polypropylene line, you will eventually suck it down to the prop. Net floats woven into the towline every six or eight feet should help prevent that.*

*
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Old 02-22-2011, 11:24 AM   #14
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RE: Another Dinghy Towing Question

Quote:
Carey wrote:


capt jerry wrote:

you could put floats on the tow line so it wont sink???
I'm with you Capt JerryI towed for several years without eating my towline, but even with polypropylene line, you will eventually suck it down to the prop. Net floats woven into the towline every six or eight feet should help prevent that.*

*


I get net floats and rope/line from the commercial net bin.* The tow line has floats every 2 ft.*

June will install an aluminum receiver, like a trailer receiver, to support the middle of the teak swim platform and then work on the design of the dink towing system during the summer.* I like to tow the dink/run about close behind the Eagle, and saw some where/place what looked like the front of a trailer with a winch and V pads to pull the dink up into and/or let the dink out.* I thought that was a great idea, but can not find and/or seen one since.* **********

I have a rough idea/sketch which the shop loves as the whole shop gets involved.* What is Phil/Fill designing/making now?* The shop will make the receiver and a proto type of the dink towing will be made out of wood and ply, until I get the design figured out. Its going to be designed so it comes apart and together in pieces so it can be changed/modified for different dinks/boats. In protect water prefer to tow but in the open blue water prefer to carry the dink on the roof.

Has anybody seen and/or know what I am talking about?
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Old 02-22-2011, 08:00 PM   #15
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RE: Another Dinghy Towing Question

Since 1984 I have had an inflatable. At that time it was an Achilles, Se11, soft bottom, wooden floor, with a 15 Merc on the stern. It towed well, and the painter length was just less than what would go from the cleat to the prop and back out to the bow of the dinghy. Next dinghy was a Caribe 10, hard bottom, 20 Yammy on the stern. It towed a little less well, as it needed trim tabs to run properly, so there was more drag. Same theory on the painter length, never a problem. Current dinghy is a Caribe 12 with a 40 Honda. Still tows well, heavier, so more drag, but never a problem. With air filled Hypalon tubes, no danger of damage to either the dinghy or the big boat. The only concern I have had with any of the dinghies, was checking the painter for chafe at the cleat and the bow fitting. So far none found. I have some great pix of the first mentioned dinghy surfing up to forward of the transom, as I surfed the big boat in 7 ft seas in Malaspina. Great ride, and the dinghy was never in danger of going sideways, flipping, or otherwise getting out of control.
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