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Old 08-08-2018, 09:20 AM   #21
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I’d do as you plan and follow the Gulf Stream. I think that will also keep you relatively close to the shore for the first few hundred miles and provide bailout opportunity in case of issues. The whole “unproven boat” concern is real and needs to be factored in. Biggest risk is probably crap in the tanks getting stirred up if the seas pick up, causing a stall when you least need it.
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Old 08-08-2018, 09:37 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by djmarchand View Post
While I don't have a clue what a POC is, I think that most trawlers could make the passage you are considering, safely. Just check the weather every day and have a bail out inlet/port in mind for the far offshore segments of the passage.


If you take the rhumb route then you will be about 200 SM offshore at the farthest point. You can make it to shore in 24 hours if the forecast goes south. But if you follow the stream, it will be even shorter to shore.


Most Defevers and similar boats have semi-displacement hulls with little or no ballast and windows that won't stand up in a real storm. But I think you can easily stay away from a real storm.

David
Yes, people don't think about the windows breaking during a storm offshore do they, but they can. I have read 1/4 glass is bad choice, but they have formulas for that. Some boats you can bolt on storm covers, I have no room for storing such things on the boat. Drenched with cold sea water inside the cabin, how is that going to be good for the electrics, or maybe flood the boat.
https://www.morganscloud.com/2014/12...house-windows/
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The Best Answer
The ultimate answer is to be able to isolate the area with large windows from the rest of the boat with a watertight hatch. Not easy or cheap to do—and pretty near impossible for a raised salon boat.

Storm Covers Recommended
For a boat with large windows that can’t implement the above option, and unless the builder could give me credible assurance that the windows were engineered to take the impact from a free fall of the boat onto water of say 15 feet, I would want to see really massive storm covers for every large window or port—say over 2.5 sq ft (.23 m2) in area.

Of course the fastening method must be equally massive. I would suggest plenty of machine screws of at least 1/4″ (6 mm) diameter into threaded plates at least 3/8″ (10 mm) thick, which are in turn bolted through the structure around the window frame.

I would also like to see an airspace between the port and the cover of at least 1/2″ (12 mm) so that flexing of the cover when struck does not smash the port.
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Old 08-08-2018, 10:34 AM   #23
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Oh yea, its hurricane season too.
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Old 08-08-2018, 09:28 PM   #24
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Good reason for staying close to shore.
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Old 08-08-2018, 10:21 PM   #25
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Sorry if I sound like Mr Obvious here but what’s wrong with cruising the ICW?

It’s protected, lots of places to stop, places to get a boat part if you need it.

I just see zero reason to venture into bigger seas if you can get to the same place by staying in calm water.
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Old 08-08-2018, 10:48 PM   #26
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Sorry if I sound like Mr Obvious here but what’s wrong with cruising the ICW?

It’s protected, lots of places to stop, places to get a boat part if you need it.

I just see zero reason to venture into bigger seas if you can get to the same place by staying in calm water.
It's shallow in areas and it's slow. He's doing a delivery run and going outside is much quicker and easier. There isn't a major issue with cruising outside. Only challenging area he faces is Hatteras and several of us have recommended inside from Beaufort to Norfolk. The other recommendation was that since it's a new boat to him to cruise close enough to shore for at least the first couple of days so as to be within a tow area if needed.
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Old 08-08-2018, 10:50 PM   #27
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Because it usually takes a lot longer. Some people do not understand the purpose of boating, “It’s the ride”.
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Old 08-08-2018, 11:17 PM   #28
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So everyone is on the same page....here's a picture of a 1987 53' Defever POC:
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Old 08-08-2018, 11:34 PM   #29
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It's shallow in areas and it's slow. He's doing a delivery run and going outside is much quicker and easier. There isn't a major issue with cruising outside. Only challenging area he faces is Hatteras and several of us have recommended inside from Beaufort to Norfolk. The other recommendation was that since it's a new boat to him to cruise close enough to shore for at least the first couple of days so as to be within a tow area if needed.
OK, Thanks!

Funny, the only people Ive ever seen get into deep kimchie were people on a delivery run...myself included.

I’d putt and enjoy the trip.
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Old 08-09-2018, 05:06 AM   #30
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Trying to address the original question, a friend of mind had a POC and regularly moved it from south FL to Long Island every year, always off shore. Solid boat and capable. Obviously, he didn't try to outrun a hurricane.
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Old 08-09-2018, 06:59 AM   #31
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Trying to address the original question, a friend of mind had a POC and regularly moved it from south FL to Long Island every year, always off shore. Solid boat and capable. Obviously, he didn't try to outrun a hurricane.
There's a difference between offshore and off continent.

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Old 08-09-2018, 07:17 AM   #32
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The only real question to answer.....

Risk versus gain..... Slow, reasonable or fast.

That boat in perfect condition is one thing, but what will it be like when ready to move it? Will you bet your life on it?
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Old 08-09-2018, 01:31 PM   #33
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SSB onboard? Going to be way outside VHF range.
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Old 08-13-2018, 12:45 PM   #34
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DeFever designed the 51 POC (performance offshore cruiser),
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Old 08-13-2018, 01:05 PM   #35
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Selene 53 Offshore 3 weeks ago

We were on the same trip you are considering 3 weeks ago. Ran directly north to Moorehead City, NC from Palm Beach. It turned to garbage about 100 miles east of Charleston, SC with lightning strikes making the ocean into this eerie undisciplined mess. This is a boat I have been running for almost a year and have no qualms about it's sea worthiness and the condition of all systems. In 45 knot gust's with stabilizers it performed. I just was not going to keep running north in the mess we were seeing at 2 am and we ultimately ran west for Charleston. My recommendation is the same as all the others, "stay closer and get to know the boat". Don't skimp on tools and plenty of spare filters! Be sure part of your crew is mechanically capable. If you do run up the ICW be very aware that with your draft you will hit bottom occasionally, even if your all over your chart's and aware of all the buoy's. Have fun and if you need any help just reach out.
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Old 08-13-2018, 01:29 PM   #36
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Have you made plans for your delivery yet? Any firm dates or still in the purchase phase?
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Old 08-13-2018, 02:10 PM   #37
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DF Cruisers Assoc

Join the DeFever Cruisers Assoc and ask this question of members who have POC.
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Old 08-13-2018, 02:10 PM   #38
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You are a sailboater used to the sails laying you over and a rounded hull form to ease the rolling motion. Based on the photo, that top-heavy boat will roll its and your guts out in any kind of a sea where you would be fairly comfy in a well-found sailboat, especially without stabilization or failed stabilizers. Then the fuel tank mung attacks and somebody is down in the bilges trying to change filters. I have been there in a 56-foot Chris Craft. Luckily, I was only a couple of hours from safe haven.
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Old 08-13-2018, 03:10 PM   #39
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Still no verification if the boat is stabilized?....or did I miss it even after rescanning?
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Old 08-13-2018, 05:59 PM   #40
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While tank gunge is the most common gremlin that stops marine diesels......I've been around and owned enough used boats that I wouldn't intentionally make that straight of a shot that takes you that far out.
Alternator, raw water pump, engine circulating pump, heat exchanger/exhaust manifolds, hydraulic steering pump/rams, shifter/throttle linkages and ends, engine/transmission, HVAC systems, bushings/bearings/seals/clamps, etc are all things that will pass an inspection yet can/will fail after several 10-12 hour days of rotation/vibration on boats that have lots of dockside hours/years----despite looking great and on boats having been meticulously maintained.
Unless you are 100% certain the boat has been used a significant amount of time (atleast 50 hours IMHO) in the month before your purchase, I'd stay within sight of land and do engine room checks every couple of hours for atleast the first 4-5 days.
Many manufacturers used to offer a cruising kit that contained LOTS of spares and rebuild components for every critical system. Knowledgeable owners whose boat didn't come with one would assemble their own. Buying spare starters, alternators, waterpumps and /or rebuild kits and every gasket and piece of plumbing you might possibly need for all these systems gets EXPEN$IVE fast. But if you are going to be out of reasonable range of assistance only you can say what that stuff is worth to you (and its worth absolutely nothing without the tools and knowledge to use it).

Most folks here preach about getting a pre purchase survey. If getting a loan its probably mandatory. The problem with a survey is its NOT a warranty/guarantee. It may indicate hull issues or engine wear or that a system is/isn't functioning AT THE TIME OF SURVEY. If someone is buying an older used boat and isn't well versed in EVERY system vital to the moving and handling of said boat and doesn't just have ALL of them replaced brand new by a reputable source they are setting themselves up for disappointment at best and quite possibly disaster. It can take months/years to go through everything on a floating house as an owner. Thats OK. I wouldn't intentionally head out in an unfounded vessel to skirt the Bermuda Triangle at the height of hurricane season. You stated that you are coming from a sailing background. Having the wind as a safety net is a luxury you will have to remind yourself can't be factored in when planning a trip.
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