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Old 09-07-2016, 10:13 AM   #21
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Ventilation...

The problem with gasoline is evaporation and venting the (explosive) vapor. This vapor is lighter than air and will rise. You need to control any potential for spill but allow the evaporating vapor to vent. In other words, something with a solid BOTTOM or catch basin but open or vented on the TOP. Propane on the other hand is heavier than air and needs to be vented (outside the boat) on the bottom, otherwise it will settle in the low area of your boat (bilge) with the potential for explosion.

I keep 15 gallons of gas in a compartment/seat on the bow of my 42' Krogen; fiberglass sealed bottom with a top lid and venting from the upper portion of the compartment.

I was a career firefighter for 27 years.
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Old 09-07-2016, 10:14 AM   #22
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Duct tape on the fuel cap would have been a less expensive solution but I'm with you on the propane motor. It seems they came out (or I heard about them) shortly after I bought my small Honda.
I hate duct tape residue. Bigger pluses from the propane are that it doesn't go bad, no chance of water in the fuel, and you can run your grill off the tank in a pinch.

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Old 09-07-2016, 10:30 AM   #23
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I have an eight foot blow up dinghy. My Honda 2HP works well but of course I have to carry gasoline and deal with fuel life and carburetor gumming issues from non-use.

And, I have to carry the outboard up and down the ladder and install it on the dinghy without dropping it in the water. I'm not as young as I used to be so weight is an issue.
I was thinking more on the lines where someone has a davit.Dont think anyone is gonna carry a diesel outboard(maybe the "rock",but definitely not me)
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Old 09-07-2016, 10:55 AM   #24
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I was thinking more on the lines where someone has a davit.Dont think anyone is gonna carry a diesel outboard(maybe the "rock",but definitely not me)
I can't imagine removing the motor every use. To me that is a sure way to discourage me from using it. I want some form of davit or crane or platform that can handle tender and motor.
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Old 09-07-2016, 11:00 AM   #25
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here that,after three back surgeries,my days of humping weight are over.Takes too long to recover,sorta like hangovers when you get older as compared to when you were twenty.
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Old 09-07-2016, 11:04 AM   #26
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Somehow the tens of thousands of cruisers seem to get by.

I personally have not heard of a fire/explosion from reasonably stored gas on a boat. At least small, normal containers in good condition and it's contents transferred properly.

Won't say it can't happen....just be a little careful and the odds are greatly with you.

Ted had his scare and made a perfectly reasonable decision. But he neither blew up or caught fire..

As I posted earlier, many.... many....probably bazillion of spills don't turn into disaster. Why? Think it through and reasonable care should be adequate.

Want to drop the danger from 99.99% safe front gas issues? Go to propane.

Now eliminate all issues to be 100% safe. Good luck!!!
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Old 09-07-2016, 11:08 AM   #27
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Somehow the tens of thousands of cruisers seem to get by.

I personally have not heard of a fire/explosion from reasonably stored gas on a boat.

Won't say it can't happen....just be a little careful and the odds are greatly with you.

Ted had his scare and made a perfectly reasonable decision. But he neither blew up or caught fire..

As I posted earlier, many.... many....probably bazillion of spills don't turn into disaster. Why? Think it through and reasonable care should be adequate.

Want to drop the danger from 99.99% safe front gas issues? Go to propane.

Now eliminate all issues to be 100% safe. Good luck!!!

agree,and a side note,gasoline stains on fiberglass are a b#$tch to remove.
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Old 09-07-2016, 11:18 AM   #28
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Not quite sure why you don't want to leave your gas can(s) in the dingy. I have separate gas container for the outboard and a spare 3 gal. gas container for the generator and leave them in the dingy covered but the cover is not entirely sealed. Never had an issue and would rather have them there than on the boat. My dingy is suspended on davits.
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Old 09-07-2016, 11:20 AM   #29
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Want to drop the danger from 99.99% safe front gas issues? Go to propane.

Now eliminate all issues to be 100% safe. Good luck!!!
Go to oars. Of course then even you introduce an additional list of dangers based on wind, current, physical condition.

You can't make any of this risk free. What you do is manage the risks. Note that in business we don't have Risk Elimination departments, we have Risk Management. I've read on here dozens of ways various boaters are managing the risks of gas on their boats. I find it a bit humorous to see the fears of gas on boats sometimes when those same people drive cars fueled by gas and I've seen and heard of thousands more fires and explosions related to gas in automobiles than I have on boats.

I've always had boats that ran on gas. Only the last few years had diesel. I'd say put the gas somewhere safely, but then spend your time worrying about electrical issues instead.
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Old 09-07-2016, 11:43 AM   #30
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The problem with gasoline is evaporation and venting the (explosive) vapor. This vapor is lighter than air and will rise. .
That is contrary to what we are told concerning gasoline powered inboard boats. We are told that gasoline vapors sink to the bottom and are to be removed with the blower (which actually sucks). The blower hoses are routed to and suck from the bottom of the bilge.
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Old 09-07-2016, 11:47 AM   #31
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I can't imagine removing the motor every use. To me that is a sure way to discourage me from using it. I want some form of davit or crane or platform that can handle tender and motor.
You have a 100 foot boat and room for a davit or crane to carry your assembled dinghy. My boat is 28 feet long and the choice is putting the dinghy on the bow and/or deflating it and storing the motor separately. Yes, it is less than convenient but it is the best I can do.

The other choice is to not have a dinghy at all.
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Old 09-07-2016, 12:04 PM   #32
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You have a 100 foot boat and room for a davit or crane to carry your assembled dinghy. My boat is 28 feet long and the choice is putting the dinghy on the bow and/or deflating it and storing the motor separately. Yes, it is less than convenient but it is the best I can do.

The other choice is to not have a dinghy at all.
I have one boat on which there is no way to carry a dinghy, the one I'm on at this very moment, so I do understand the issue. In your case, you're right, that is your only choice. I know some facing what you do who choose to carry kayaks instead or inflatables. What do you normally use your dinghy for?

And the fact what you have to go through does discourage use of the dinghy remains.
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Old 09-07-2016, 12:12 PM   #33
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I have one boat on which there is no way to carry a dinghy, the one I'm on at this very moment, so I do understand the issue. In your case, you're right, that is your only choice. I know some facing what you do who choose to carry kayaks instead or inflatables. What do you normally use your dinghy for?

And the fact what you have to go through does discourage use of the dinghy remains.
We use our dinghy for rides to the beach or to explore around where we are anchored. We do not anchor in front of a marina and dinghy in, we pay for a slip. We have a small dog who does not really have to go ashore to pee or poop, she uses puppy pads. She does enjoy the beach though and we enjoy it as well.

The most discouraging part is inflating and setting up the dinghy, not attaching the motor. I can keep the dinghy on the bow, ready to go in most cases but if the weather is bad and we can't operate from the flybridge, it's best to deflate it for better vision.

Some folks will tilt their dinghies up on the swim platform but that blocks rear vision and takes away the ability to enter and exit the boat via the swim platform. The motor would still have to be removed though.

I can tow it but I'm still not comfortable leaving the motor on it and I would only tow it in calm water.
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Old 09-07-2016, 12:31 PM   #34
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I have an eight foot blow up dinghy. My Honda 2HP works well but of course I have to carry gasoline and deal with fuel life and carburetor gumming issues from non-use.

And, I have to carry the outboard up and down the ladder and install it on the dinghy without dropping it in the water. I'm not as young as I used to be so weight is an issue.
My situation exactly. With a 2hp Honda, 2 gallons of gas will last you half a season. 27 lbs seems my sweet spot as well...Those of us with smaller boats figure out how to make it work (ie: stuffing 10 lbs of stuff in a 5 lb bag)
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Old 09-07-2016, 01:18 PM   #35
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Makes sense to go with the least motor possible. In your situation, kayaks are worth considering. May not be your thing though, but easy to use. I'm with you on not wanting to tow it, but know others who prefer towing to davits as it allows them to go bigger.

Do you use any sort of lift to help you get the dinghy to and from the water?

Wes: You use it exactly the way we do. We like to explore. We see water that leads beyond where the boat can go and we want to check it out. We see land and we're curious as to what is on it.
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Old 09-07-2016, 03:30 PM   #36
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somebody just came out with a powered kayak,six grand,are they kidding.Company is from texas,cant remember the name.
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Old 09-07-2016, 03:57 PM   #37
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Greetings,
Mr. Rekindle. We may be arguing semantics but gasoline vapor is heavier than air as Mr. WK points out in post #30.
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Old 09-07-2016, 04:51 PM   #38
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I cover my gas cans with white canvas so the gas remains cool in sunshine.
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Old 09-07-2016, 05:23 PM   #39
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Gas vapors do indeed drop because they are heavier than air. Air has a weight density of 1 and gas vapors have a weight density of between 3 and 4. Vapor densities less than 1 will rise and greater than 1 will fall. The problem with carrying gas on board a diesel powered boat is that if there is any small gas spill or leak, the vapors can travel down into the boat causing a potential explosive situation. Vapors can travel a lot farther than one might think. Most diesel powered boats do not have ignition protected components installed in them because they are generally not required on a diesel boat. Most diesel powered boats do not have ignition protected bilge blowers either so if you do get some gas vapors down into the bilge, how do you get them out without blowing up the boat? When we carry gas for the dinghy, we either leave it in the dinghy on the swim platform brackets or strap it down on the swim platform. That way if any vapors get out of the tank, they will drop down to the surface of the water and dissipate without any problem. If you do carry gas inside the boat or up on deck/flybridge you should look at the potential paths that the vapors could take into the boat. If there are paths that lead into the boat, find another place to store the gas.
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Old 09-07-2016, 05:40 PM   #40
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We strap a gas jug to the swim step.
Yes, and Yamaha makes a secure rubber mat for under the gas can. No gas on the boat.
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