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Old 12-19-2012, 03:01 PM   #21
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Everything I hear about PNW boating sounds too scary to me. Insane tide rips, crossing the bar to enter rivers, fog, snow, bears, rocks, deadheads everywhere ....
Everything you hear is correct. The life expectancy of a recreational cruiser owner up here is 8.576 years. If the tide rips don't get him the whirlpools will, or the non-existent visibility will put him on the rocks, or the monster waves outside every harbor will pitchpole him. And even if he manages to avoid all that, it's just a matter of time before a passing orca pod or sperm whale will simply get pissed at the sight of his boat and sink it. My wife and I have been lucky so far but we are well aware we are living on borrowed time every time we take either of the boats out.

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IF, big IF, I were to get a boat from the West Coast I'd be getting her back East post-haste!
Something to keep in mind in this regard. We had our GB36 trucked up from SFO Bay. The company that did the haul, Associated, is one of the most experienced marine trucking firms in the business. They told us that in the western US the largest GB that can be trucked without removing the flying bridge is a GB36. The marine haulers use, or should use, special lowboy trailers that drop the forefoot of the boat nearly to the pavement, which gives a bit more vertical clearance to bridges and overpasses.

They said in the eastern part of the US, and particularly New England, even a GB36 my have to have the flying bridge removed depending on the route, because of the much older bridges and overpasses that tend to have lower clearances than the newer ones out west.

So while trucking is a very viable option and, in our case, cost the same as hiring a delivery skipper, if you get a boat the size of the GB42 in your ad, the flying bridge will have to come off. This is no big deal--- the flying bridges of GBs and probably other makes too, are designed for this. But it does take time at both ends to take it off and pack it and then replace it at the other end. And unless you elect to do this all yourself, the labor cost is something you'll need to figure in.
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Old 12-19-2012, 04:13 PM   #22
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... the flying bridges of GBs and probably other makes too, are designed for this. But it does take time at both ends to take it off and pack it and then replace it at the other end. And unless you elect to do this all yourself, the labor cost is something you'll need to figure in.
Mine removes very easy. I was just replacing the flybridge canvas and exploring around I realized there are only a handful of 1/2" bolts holding the entire thing on. Toughest part would be disconnecting the wiring and hydraulics and then packing it as you describe.

It would still be a pretty spendy haul.
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Old 12-19-2012, 08:24 PM   #23
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Everything I hear about PNW boating sounds too scary to me. Insane tide rips, crossing the bar to enter rivers, fog, snow, bears, rocks, deadheads everywhere ....

IF, big IF, I were to get a boat from the West Coast I'd be getting her back East post-haste!

That's all just smoke from Marin to keep people away.
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Old 12-19-2012, 08:36 PM   #24
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And it's WORKING. Our immigrants-from-other-states rate has been going down the last few years if the news is to be believed.

And with the weather getting more overcast and rainy more days of the year now thanks to climate change, we're hoping that more and more residents start moving away.

Of course if they don't we can just crank up Mount St. Helens again. It's always good to have a carry permit for a volcano.
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Old 12-20-2012, 07:07 AM   #25
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Does the 7437 engine hours alarm anyone? Seems high to me, but I don't know Lehmans.
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Old 12-20-2012, 07:28 AM   #26
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Seriously Darrell, if you are not seriously looking yet, then forget this one, and just keep an eye out in your nearer market. Even over here, one of those comes up for sale within an hours drive of me on a regular basis, so I expect the same over there or moreso. All that expense to truck or move one from one coast to the other would be dubious economics in my view. And no, I'm not plotting to sneak over and grab it.
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Old 12-20-2012, 10:14 AM   #27
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We had our 44 (48 OAL) hauled from Texas to Michigan some years ago. I insisted that the flybridge stay attached. The trucker worked around that restriction by providing a lead "pole" truck/car. The route instructions on the gps route plan in the lead vehicle identified bridges/overpasses that were too low for the load, and also specified work around routing....typically taking the exit/entry ramp to bypass an obstruction. The trip took a bit longer and the extra truck was an additional cost, but it was largely offset by avoiding disassembly and reassembly costs associated with removing the flybridge. In fact, for our boat, the flybridge would have likely required a second (smaller) flatbed truck anyway. The 1400 mile trip including partial disassembly, loading, and unloading cost was $9K in 2006...I'd guess about $12K today. The dink rode on a rack over the rear wheel truck on the tractor. Worked out well.
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Old 12-20-2012, 10:33 AM   #28
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Not to worry, Peter. When handing over large piles of cash I tend to move even slower than our boats.
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Old 12-20-2012, 11:50 AM   #29
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Why not get a real toy boat real cheap and begin a long and interesting relationship?

75' CRN Super Conero project boat for next to nothing. - YachtForums.Com
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Old 12-20-2012, 12:05 PM   #30
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Greetings,
Mr. RickB. I've been looking at that one....I don't think it'll ever happen though....But on the other hand.....
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Old 12-20-2012, 12:16 PM   #31
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Why not get a real toy boat real cheap and begin a long and interesting relationship?

75' CRN Super Conero project boat for next to nothing. - YachtForums.Com

I seem to have some problems with long, although not necessarily with interesting, relationships. To which a string of PO'd wimmen will attest.
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Old 12-20-2012, 06:31 PM   #32
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Does the 7437 engine hours alarm anyone? Seems high to me, but I don't know Lehmans.
The FL120 is said (by people like Bob Smith at American Marine who did much of the marinization work at Lehman back when these engines were new) to be a 12,000 to 14,000 hour engine in recreational boat service, assuming that the engine is operated and maintained correctly. They have gone as long as 25,000 hours in commercial service on Washington State ferryboats before needing a core overhaul.

The FL135 like this particular boat has is a close cousin to the FL120 but it's not the same base engine. I have never seen any average service life numbers for this engine.

Keith of this forum has one in his Krogen but since he has my posts blocked he won't see this and so be encouraged to comment. Someone else might want to ask him about the FL135's reputation, however. From everything I have heard it's very good but I've never heard numbers.
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