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Old 10-12-2010, 11:51 PM   #1
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Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

As the title suggests, I'm thinking of purchasing an older Grand Banks (70's model). This will be a big purchase for me, and I happened upon this site and thought I may get some good feedback here. I have many questions, but my most pressing one is: how do I find the best boat for the best price? I don't like the idea of dealing with brokers. Can anybody here share with me how they bought their old boat, and give me some ideas on how I can find one in good shape for a fair price? I plan on living aboard, and don't want to deal with a lot of extensive repairs, such as rot. I am very handy, though, and can deal with some issues. I just don't want a "project". I'd like a boat which is ready for use immediately. Any and all responses are greatly appreciated. And, yes, the dog is living aboard with me, hence my moniker.
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Old 10-13-2010, 12:39 AM   #2
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Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

We bought our GB in 1998 through a broker who specializes in GBs. Boats are sometimes like real estate--- the agents (brokers) often know about houses (boats) that are coming on the market before they actually do. This was the case with us--- the selling broker had contacted the GB dealer in Seattle/Bellingham to see if they knew of anyone who might be interested in an older GB36 that was coming on the market. If not, the boat would be listed for sale within a few days. The owner had just moved up to a newer GB46 and didn't want to own two boats. The listing had been faxed to the local GB broker about an hour before my wife and I walked in to just to discuss the possibility of buying an older GB for ourselves--- we'd had no intention of buying anything that day. But the deal was too good to pass up so we put an offer on the boat that day, it was accepted by the owner who was running his GB46 down the coast to San Francisco Bay, we flew down and inspected, sea trialed, and surveyed the boat and engines, and in the end, closed the deal. We had the boat trucked from Alameda to Tacoma, Washington where we had some work done on it in a yard there and then we took it up to Bellingham on it's own hull, a day and a half run.

So I wouldn't rule out using a broker to help you find the right boat as long as the broker is reputable and experienced with GBs. They can have connections that might find you a good boat before it actually hits the market.

I would also strongly suggest you join the Grand Banks Owners Association http://www.grandbanksowners.com. It's free but they do accept donations, and there are people on that forum who know more about Grand Banks than Grand Banks does, particularly people like Bob Lowe, Don Prior, Tom Overs, etc. In addition to asking questions to the forum the archives is full of every topic imaginable, from taking care of a teak deck to rebuilding windows to the best way to finish teak (many opinions) to servicing a Ford Lehman 120, to you-name-it about GBs.

GBs were made of wood until the second half of 1973 when they switched production of first the GB36 and then the GB42 to fiberglass. The GB32 was switched to fiberglass a little later. All GB32s (with a tiny handful of exceptions) are single engine. GB36s and 42s were available with one or two engines, although as time went by fewer and fewer GB42s were ordered with one engine.

It is said that the best fiberglass hulls GB ever made were the ones made from the start of fiberglass boats in mid-1973 to mid-1974. The reason for this was the man who got GB into fiberglass and built the first molds, Howard Abbey. However this does not imply that hulls that were made after Abbey's departure (they brought him back twice to fix production problems) are second rate. They're excellent but they're supposedly not quite as excellent as the hulls built under Abbey's direct supervision

The company began using new molds for the GB36 and GB42 in 1988. The new molds made both boats a wee bit longer, a wee bit wider, and considerably taller for more interior space. For example, a pre-88 GB36 like ours has a forward head but it is very small and has no shower. The only shower is a portion of the aft head that can can be curtained off. A post-88 GB36 has a separate shower stall in the aft cabin and the forward head got large enough to incorporate a curtained-off shower space.

But my best advice if you're interested in a GB is to joint the GB owners forum.* Particularly if you are thinking of getting a wood GB (aka Woody).* There are a lot of things to be aware of when buying an older wood boat and there are a lot of Woody owners on the GB owners forum, so lots of good advice is available.* However be aware that an older fiberglass GB has a LOT of wood in and on it, too, so there are things to be aware of when shopping for one of them as well.

A GB32 is considered by most people to be too small of a boat to live on, as is the GB36.* The GB42 has considerably more space than the GB36 despite being only 6 feet longer and for a single person or a couple who doesn't mind being kind of on top of each other all the time it can be a decent live-aboard.* Probably the best GB for living aboard is the GB46, which is still small enough to not be a killer in the moorage expense department and small enough for a couple to handle quite well.* However the GB46 is a newer model and so commands higher prices.




-- Edited by Marin on Wednesday 13th of October 2010 01:02:27 AM
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Old 10-13-2010, 04:45 AM   #3
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RE: Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

I plan on living aboard, and don't want to deal with a lot of extensive repairs, such as rot. I am very handy, though, and can deal with some issues. I just don't want a "project". I'd like a boat which is ready for use immediately

Thge requirements for a live aboard will be quite different from a boat that is cruised.

Mostly the location will determine how much heating (or Air Cond) will be required.

On the right coast any where north of Norfolk Va cam not afford or get aboard sufficient electric power. So a heating system is required.

This can be a major job , my recommendation is the Hurricane System for marina boats and the Reflex or Dickinson for anchoring out.

Air cond is required at least as far north as Georgia , usually only a dockside setup.

Waste is also a problem , depending on how well setup the marina is.

Some can pump the holding tank in the slip , others require the boat to move to the pump site.

A pain , weather the harbor is iced or not.

Water cap needs to be quite generous , as removing frozen hoses , dragging them to the Marina shower for a couple of hours of hot bath, and dragging them (hundreds of ft?) from a winter supply to the boat can get old , RAPIDLY below Zero.

A liveaboard boat is as specific as any other specialized boat.

San Diego CA might be able to get by with a stock boat.
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Old 10-13-2010, 07:58 AM   #4
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RE: Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

Why Grand Banks???
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Old 10-13-2010, 08:27 AM   #5
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RE: Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

I have to echo John Baker's question. (eg why a GB?) You don't say where you're located, but on either coast there will be a lot of choices for a liveaboard trawler, and the fact that you're looking for an older GB seems to indicate you are somewhat budget limited. Your $$ can go farther on other boats.

I am sure there are a lot of boats that might meet your needs, without the premium that even the old woodie GB's command. Condition is everything. A Taiwanese CHB, Marine Trader, or such may be found in good condition for a real discount over a GB of similar size and condition, and you might find a larger more comfortable boat.

Keep an open mind.
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Old 10-13-2010, 08:39 AM   #6
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RE: Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

WHY a "trawler"? " Keep an open mind." Is very good advice.

What is your list of DESIREMENTS?
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Old 10-13-2010, 09:19 AM   #7
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Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

Thank you for the replies, and sorry for the limited amount of information. I am in the Puget Sound region, so iced up harbors aren't a problem, though heat will be needed. The marina has a sewage pump, as well as other amenities.

Why Grand Banks, and why a trawler? It's what I've always wanted. I'm sure arguments can be made for other style boats, but it's a matter of personal preference. Yes, my budget is somewhat limited (I'd like to stay around $40k as I'm paying cash and am not interested in financing a boat), but I'm hopeful I can find something older in very serviceable condition for this amount. I have been looking at CHB's and Marine Trader's as well. I would certainly consider one of them, but I do like the Grand Banks better. It's kind of like the question "why did I buy an older Dodge Cummins?" It's what I wanted, and suited my tastes.

I prefer something with an aft cabin. I like the Grand Banks 36', but prefer a single engine for economical operation. I have seen some singles, but most are twins. The Marine Trader double cabins are nice, and so are the CHB's. I do wonder how well insulated any of these boats will be during the winter (windows, etc.). I am actually quite at home in cold weather, so it does not need to be 70 degrees inside for me to be comfortable. 40's would be a little chilly, though.

While I don't want to get into extensive rot repair, I am certainly not opposed to refinishing wood, upholstery, etc. I'd rather stay away from an engine rebuild right now. I'd really like to find something which is completely original (no bad remodels like a few I have seen). Prices seem to be high where I am at, and less expensive in CA. I have thought about buying out of state, and shipping the boat. The economic pain insofar as real estate is concerned is really starting to ramp up in WA, so that might work into my favor as I am seeing a lot of price reduced listings, though they still are not priced as many out of state boats. It's hard, too, to get an idea of the true condition just by looking at pictures of listings. I am still in research mode which is why I am here.

Edit: Keep in mind I am a 41 year old single guy with a dog who is used to a minimalist lifestyle. I don't need much more than a place to lay my head to be content. The marina has showers and laundry facilities, and the boats I have seen have more than enough in the way of creature comforts. I will not be overwhelming the boat with junk. It will be me, a computer and some other electronics, clothing, my dog, and a lot of happiness.



-- Edited by BoatDog on Wednesday 13th of October 2010 09:25:00 AM
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Old 10-13-2010, 10:10 AM   #8
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RE: Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

You will be hard pressed to find a GB in "serviceable" condition in that price range....especially in Trawler land up there in the PNW. Please don't let any of us dampen your spirits...keep searching. My question was really "Why GB"...not "Why Trawler". I understand wanting to stay with the trawler style. It is just that the GB does command a premium. Anyway, I do think a good search could turn up a decent CHB or MT in that price range. Good luck and welcome aboard and enjoy the lifestyle.
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Old 10-13-2010, 11:50 AM   #9
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RE: Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

There are several GB for sale under 50K, all built in the 70s, all Wood, many twin diesel.* You can probably talk them down well into the low 40s if they want to sell.

But consider:* survey+haul out = >$1000** Tax?* Insurance?* Slip fee? Then they'll have teak decks and that will be a problem sooner or later.* Fuel tanks?* Leaky windows?* The list goes on.* Prepare to bleed money.

We just bought our trawler (not a GB), and between the trips to Florida (where we didn't find a boat), survey, tax, and insurance, as well as unscheduled repairs, and stocking the boat with kitchen stuff, sheets, tools, and other equipment, I think we probably spent 10K above the final price of the boat. Insurance and 13 months of slip they wanted their money up front, although in PNW there are no hurricanes so probably a lot less.
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Old 10-13-2010, 12:45 PM   #10
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Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

Forty grand's not going to get you much even in this depressed market. This limits you almost exclusively to wood boats in the GB market, and $40k will get you a wood boat that needs a lot of attention. This (PNW) is a bad climate for woodies. It rains all the time, the air is humid, and a wood boat kept outside is going to be very demanding in terms of upkeep. It is amazing how many ways water figures out how to get down into the structure of a wood boat. There's a reason why almost every really nice wood boat you see around here (of any make) turns out to be living in a boathouse. And a boathouse can easily cost you more than your stated budget of $40k.

While you may be able to find a wood GB32 or maybe even a GB36 for your stated budget, it will be a "beater" in many ways. Not that it can't be brought up to snuff, but it will probably take at least what you spent on it to do it. And as someone--- FF perhaps--- pointed out in another thread, wood doesn't stop deteriorating because you don't have the time right now to fix it. So the notion of doing a major rebuild job on a wood boat over a period of time in this climate may not be realistic. A lot of people start out thinking that it is, which is why you can find old wood GBs for cheap sometimes--- they are invariably boats that proved to be too much for their owners to deal with.

So my advice at this point in your boating life is to forget about a GB for now. You want a fiberglass boat---- if your budget dictates an older one, trust me, it will provide all the fix-it, maintain-it challenges you will ever want--- and it's the only way you're going to get a reasonably reliable boat that you can start to use right now.

And you live in an area with some decent choices of older fiberglass boats that were very good when they were new so tend to hold up over time. Tollycraft is one make that comes to mind. A co-worker bought a Tolly 26 a few years ago and his son is living on it right now. The next size up is, I believe, the Tolly 30. Also a very nice boat. And so on. Even--- horror of horrors--- Bayliner made some good boats in the 30 to 38 foot range.

If you're absolutely determined that a "trawler style" boat is what you want, you still should forget about GB. Look at some of the other brands that have been mentioned. CHB, Marine Trader, Puget Trawler, etc. You might find one of their smaller models in serviceable condition for the kind of money you're thinking of spending.

And Woody made a very important point. Buying the boat is only part of the equation. There is moorage, which in the Tacoma-Seattle-Everett area is WAY expensive. Which is one reason we keep our boat in Bellingham. Around here most marinas charge extra for the electricity you use. Insurance is being required by more and more marinas in this area as a condition of getting a slip and getting insurance on a very old wood boat in mediocre condition can be challenging. And I assume you know that the slip doesn't go with the boat. So unless you can work out private moorage not in a commercial marina, the chances are you will end up at the bottom of a two to five year waiting list for a slip.

The very rough rule of thumb is that ownership costs--- the cost of moorage, insurance, fuel, maintenance, repairs, and upgrades--- is about ten percent of the purchase price (or value) of the boat per year. For as long as you own your boat. Some years will be more, some less, depending on what sort of expenses crop up. On an older boat, particularly a wood one, the chances are the average will be more than ten percent a year more years than it's less than ten percent.


-- Edited by Marin on Wednesday 13th of October 2010 06:23:33 PM
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Old 10-13-2010, 07:58 PM   #11
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Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

I think it's probably wise to go with a fiberglass boat. I do love the Grand Banks, but I'm sure something I'd be interested in is well out of my price range as far as their fiberglass models go. I want to keep it at $40k. I could go $50k, or even a little more, but I don't want to. I have a budget, and I am sticking to it. I think this economy will provide me with some good options at that price point. If not, I won't buy anything. I wouldn't imagine there are a lot of people with cash who are looking at the boats I am interested in (old), but I could be wrong. It would seem that most who do are looking at much newer, more expensive boats. I like old stuff that doesn't depreciate much. Therefore, if I use it for a few years and want to sell it, I don't take such a financial beating.

As far as Bayliner goes- NO WAY (I really mean no way in hell). I don't know much about Tollycraft, but I could look into them. CHB and Marine Trader would be at the top of my list. I like the older boats with the beautiful teak interiors and parque floors. I don't like the cheap crap like I've seen in some other brands as well as some newer boats.

Regarding moorage fees, insurance, fuel, etc.- I've already looked into all of that. That's not part of my budget. The $40k is for the boat purchase, period. It'll cost me $460 per month for moorage, $130 for insurance, and fuel and maintenance on top of that. It's still a very cheap way to live as far as I am concerned.

On the maintenance and repair side of things, I am religious in terms of upkeep on my truck, my motorcycle, campers, houses, etc. If anything needs even a modicum of attention, it is addressed right away. I am that person who passes something on in much better shape than he inherited it, and I always hope to buy something from someone such as myself, but it's rare that I ever do. It seems most people defer maintenance on things for whatever reason. I am under no illusions that some of these old boats won't need a mountain of work. I'd like to stay away from those. I am not ready for another major project right now. I don't mind hauling the boat and painting the bottom and doing that sort of thing, but cutting out and replacing massive amounts of rotten wood will have to wait for some date in the future should I ever want to "rebuild" an old boat. I am well aware of what the weather in WA can do to wood. I once bought a quaint bungalow overlooking the Sound which had been neglected for decades. Not many people would touch such a thing (the sills were completed rotted away, all windows leaked, the gutters were backing up underneath the roofing and rotting the walls, and on and on and on) but I happily did and spent two full years completely rebuilding the entire house which turned out fantastic.

I'd like to thank you all again for taking the time to respond. I'll keep checking in here and let you all know what I find. It might take some amount of time to find the one that calls my name. One thing I know is that I do not want to pay for a survey of each and every boat I am interested in. I will take a really good look at all of them, then pay for a survey on the one that I'd really like just to make sure there are no problems I've missed.

-- Edited by BoatDog on Wednesday 13th of October 2010 10:34:45 PM
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Old 10-13-2010, 10:57 PM   #12
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RE: Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

DogAs much as I like GBs, I have to ask why you chose GB? You say you don't want a project. Well, then you are already in trouble. Within the realm of affordability, you will not find a GB in wood or fiberglass that is not a project. At the very least, there is the constant upkeep reguired on the brightwork. That alone is enough to stop me. Next, as Marin can attest, there are windows to rebuild in an older GB. I won't bother with any more specifics, because if I've read your initial post correctly, you should now be looking at other options.
I also won't bother suggesting a specific boat or brand, because everyone is different in what they want for layout, as well as the myriad other elements of a boat. I suggest you identify any and all elements that matter to you, and keep yourself a little note card with those items in bold. Seek out only the boats with NO brightwork, stainless rails, fiberglass hull and house, no canvas, and very accessible mechanics.
There is no such thing as the perfect boat, but there may be a perfect boat for you. Once you have identified that type, brand, or model, I would say don't be afraid of brokers, as they can be helpful. Use your gut to determine whether or not to trust the broker in front of you.
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Old 10-14-2010, 12:38 AM   #13
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Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

Quote:
BoatDog wrote:

I like the older boats with the beautiful teak interiors and parque floors.*
For your stated budget it is not too likely that you'll find a boat with these features.* Or if it does have them, they will be so beat up or deteriorated they'll most likely need replacement.* And given the staggering cost of proper Burmese teak these days, you don't want to be buying it if you don't have to.

Also, FWIW, most fiberglass GBs from the early 70s and I believe all the woodys have* painted interiors, not teak.* The cabinetry and interior trim is teak but all the bulkheads, doors, etc. are painted.* All the bulkheads, side walls, doors, etc. are paneled in mahogany ply and painted.* The same is true of newer GBs, but they put a teak veneer over the mahogany ply panels on the bulkhead and side walls for that "all teak" look.* These are shots of our '73 fiberglass GB.

Regarding Carey's statement about GB windows, there are 21 of them on our GB36.* We have rebuilt or refinished 18 of them and have the three front pilothouse windows to go.* Interestingly, we didn't overhaul any of them because they were leaking. * We have never had a leaking window on the boat in the twelve years we've owned it. The first one we did was because the track the sliding pane ran in was so grunged up we had to hit the window pane to get it to slide open and one day I hit it too hard.*

Once we'd done the first one we realized the process was not all that difficult.* So we've been overhauling them to strip, CPES, and paint frames, replace old glass, replace* old track in the sliding windows, and so on.* In one case a lower frame component was getting soft with rot so we rebuilt the frame with a new lower section.

The windows and window frames in fiberglass GBs are very easy to dissassemble and remove other than the often-big job of breaking their sealant bond.* In one case a previous owner had bedded a frame with 5200.* I'm rather proud of the fact that we were able to get it off the boat without breaking or cracking the frame although it took us over two hours to do it.*

Windows are more tricky on woodies because the window frames are held to the boat from the inside, which requires removing interior window trim to get at the screws.* All the window components on a fiberglass GB can be removed and installed from the outside.

So as you can see, owning a GB is not a walk in the park, and owning an old one can be more like a walk in the woods through blackberry bushes in the dark when it's raining and you know there's a bear somewhere nearby.





-- Edited by Marin on Thursday 14th of October 2010 01:01:42 AM
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Old 10-14-2010, 12:56 AM   #14
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RE: Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

Quote:
Marin wrote:

*
BoatDog wrote:

I like the older boats with the beautiful teak interiors and parque floors.*
For your stated budget it is not too likely that you'll find a boat with these features.* Or if it does have them, they will be so beat up or deteriorated they'll most likely need replacement.* And given the staggering cost of proper Burmese teak these days, you don't want to be buying it if you don't have to.

Also, FWIW, most fiberglass GBs from the early 70s and I believe all the woodys have* painted interiors, not teak.* The cabinetry and interior trim is teak but all the bulkheads, doors, etc. are painted.* All the bulkheads, side walls, doors, etc. are paneled in mahogany ply and painted.* The same is true of newer GBs, but they put a teak veneer over the mahogany ply panels on the bulkhead and side walls for that "all teak" look.* These are shots of our '73 fiberglass GB.



*

So, something like this is an anomaly, and won't come around again?

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi...oat_id=2183510

In this economy, I like my chances.

*
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Old 10-14-2010, 04:21 AM   #15
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Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

"I have thought about buying out of state, and shipping the boat. '

I sugest you look in Florida Mariner, the boats should be 1/2 price compared to where you are.

Remember on the trailer the hight can only be 13.5 ft , so oxygen tents and fly bridge will be transported in the cockpit.

Second choice might be Panama ,if you are looking for a more offshore boat than a TT.

Folks find it EZ to go down wind , down current from the Left coast , then learn what happens when thet try to get back (Wrong Boat! Big waves.)

Deck cargo is a cash deal on many smaller ships , a capts bonus.

Otherwise there is Craigs list , and an Estate sale .

IN Fl trolling for abondoned looking boats behind private houses or WAAAY back in strrage boat yards is the key to really cheap, but loads of work may be needed.

Green interior!


-- Edited by FF on Thursday 14th of October 2010 04:24:27 AM
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Old 10-14-2010, 11:49 AM   #16
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RE: Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

Quote:
BoatDog wrote:


So, something like this is an anomaly, and won't come around again?

...
In this economy, I like my chances.
I wouldn't hold my breath expecting another one like that anytime soon.* Wonder how long it was on the markey before it sold?* the boat we just bought was on the market for maybe a month.* The nice boats don't last long; you aren't the only one looking.*

We looked for six months and we saw a lot of crappy boats, including an early 70s wooden grand banks for ~$35,000.* It finally sold when the price was lowered to $25,000.* It looked decent in the photos but MAN did it look awful in real life.* It needed to be completly sanded down and repainted inside and out and all the bright work redone.* The PO had done it all himself and he was NOT a craftsman.* As Marin said, the older GBs have painted interiors.*

We found a mid 80s boat with a beautiful wood interior and teak and holly sole but it was a lot more than $40k.* We walked on board and were blown away, after all the crap we had looked at.* You just have to decide what your priorities are!!

Happy shopping!

*
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Old 10-14-2010, 12:09 PM   #17
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Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

Quote:
BoatDog wrote:So, something like this is an anomaly, and won't come around again?

You see that little*sentence "Does need some TLC"?* That is almost always-- particularly with a wood boat--- an indication that the boat needs a LOT of work.* Don't trust photos--- just about any boat that's still on top of the water can look good in photos.* Photos show you the paint, that's about all.* They don't show the massive dry rot in the subdeck, failing plank fasteners, etc.

As to the "ready to cruise" statement, that's attached to every ad for a boat that is able to move under its own power.* It tells you nothing about the condition of the engines, tranmissions, shafts, cutless bearings, props, etc.

Unless the owner of this particular boat is so desperate for money that they are giving the boat away, I would be totally leery of a GB36--- even an old woody like this one--- at that price.* Unless the owner is so in need of sellng the boat to be willing to take a big loss it, this boat will have some major problems to deal with that will probably cost the price of the boat to fix.

Never say never, but that has been my experience and observation with regards to GBs over the last 12 years.* Were I in the market for a GB36 woody, I doubt I would even consider this one given the price unless I could learn the conditions under which the seller was trying to sell it.* Every now and then a deal like this can come up (on any make of boat) where the boat is actually halfway decent but the seller is desparate to rid him/herself of the boat.

However the only way to find out for sure is to haul the boat and have it VERY thoroughly surveyed by a surveyor who REALLY understands wood boats.* These guys are few and far between.* The surveyor who can do a fine job on a glass boat is more often than not totally at sea on a wood boat.* While I can't believe there is only one, I know of only one surveyor in the Puget Sound region I would trust to do a complete and correct survey on a wood GB.* I don't know the situation anywhere else.

I watched a friend (he was the broker who found us our boat) take a wood GB32 which he'd purchased as "ready to cruise," "needs some work" and put almost $100 grand into it, from a new John Deere engine to*installing a number*of new planks below the water line to*a total rebuild of the flying bridge to a complete-- and I mean total--- refinish of the entire interior of the boat.* The boat was like a Whack-a-Mole game: every time he*started to fix a problem, another one, often much more severe, was uncovered.*

He ended up with an immaculate GB32, but there was no way he could ever come close to recouping what he put into it.* And this was when the economy was good and boat-buying activity was hot.* He was very knowledgeable about GBs but he told me later that had he known what this "nice-looking, ready to cruise" boat would require him to do and the end cost of doing it, he never would have bought it.

The boat itself aside, the costs to get a boat across the country are not insignificant.* Way back in 1998 it cost us $4,000 to have our GB36 trucked from Alameda up to Tacoma.* Twelve years later I've heard that trucking costs for that same basic distance are at least half again as high.* I've never had any reason to price trucking costs from*the east or southeast coasts*to the PNW but people on the GB forum have and I seem to recall it's well into five figures.

The company we used had a special low-boy trailer that dropped the forefoot of the boat almost to the pavement.* This meant that the flying bridge did not have to come off.* The trucking company told us that a GB36 was the largest GB they*could do this way--- anything larger had to have the flying bridge removed.

But the bridge clearances in the eastern part of the country are often lower than out west because the highways and bridges are older back there.* If the flying bridge of a GB woody has to come off for transporation and then be put back on, you're looking at a major (aka expensive) job. On a glass GB it's not a small job but it's basically "just" unscrewing a whole lot of relatively easy-to-get-to screws.


-- Edited by Marin on Thursday 14th of October 2010 12:27:53 PM
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Old 10-14-2010, 12:39 PM   #18
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RE: Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

Quote:
Marin wrote:

* Don't trust photos--- just about any boat that's still on top of the water can look good in photos.* Photos show you the paint, that's about all.* They don't show the massive dry rot in the subdeck, failing plank fasteners, etc.

We looked at many boats in Florida last Winter, in person.* One boat in particular, an Albin 41, looked great in the pictures and listed features on Yachtworld, and the price was right too!* It had pictures in the water and underway and all of them sparkled.* When we got to see the boat in person it had been sitting on the hard for who knows how long, and had collected a year's worth of dirt on the outside, and the inside had a pretty funky smell too.

Beware the photos.* The only way you'll know is to go and look at the boat yourself or have someone you trust do it for you.* But I would only go in person since there are intangible things that only I would notice.* I'm glad I didn't end up buying from Florida because the trips back and forth for the second and third look, sea trial and survey, and delivery would have been difficult to schedule.

*
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Old 10-14-2010, 12:39 PM   #19
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RE: Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

I just bought an early 80's GB 36 and we love it.* Here's what I found:*we looked for low*engine hours (2000 hrs)--boat buying is all about good engines.**The fuel tanks*were replaced 10 years ago with aluminum.**There*is no telling how long the steel*fuel tanks last after 30 years. *Tank replacement is a huge expense replacing.* We opted for the twin engine F/L's.* I am guessing 30% more in fuel as compared to single engien BUT--I like the two engine concept and it really helps with boat maneuvering and lots of power.* It is like a little tug boat.*

This boat had some nice upgrades--AC, genset (8K), nice electronics package, autopilot.* I'm now heavy into the cosmetic fix-up.* The boat was structually sound.

Best advice--the more you look, you'll know when you see a good deal.* Yacht World was addicting but very helpful to see what is out there.

Good luck
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Old 10-14-2010, 07:46 PM   #20
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RE: Help with purchasing older Grand Banks

It's too bad I am about as far away from Florida as one can be, and still be in the continental US. The prices are much better there, as is the selection. I can't imagine shipping a boat for less than $10k. That doesn't even get into travel expenses, etc. It's just not realistic given my location.
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