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Old 01-18-2014, 07:08 PM   #21
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RickB,
I enjoy reading your responses and replies, due to your extensive technical knowledge. I did read the article you posted, and as most news articles do, it left a lot of details out, as to what kind of welding he was doing, where on the tanks, how much fuel was in the tank, etc. etc. If someone were stick welding on a tank below a fuel level, then I could certainly understand how it could get hot enough to explode.
So, from that, my opinion here is that we are talking about apples and oranges.
Thanks,
Chuck
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Old 01-19-2014, 08:41 AM   #22
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Just passing along the other side of the story. Most fuel tank fires and explosions occur because people thought there was no risk involved in whatever they were doing. Call it due diligence.

Having done a few jobs like that I am fond of using CO2 inerting via dry ice or a bottle until the tank has been opened enough to ventilate fully.
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Old 01-26-2014, 11:09 PM   #23
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Rick,
The dry ice is a very good idea. I have used that procedure in a very different non boating situation. My fuel tank had been cleaned and well ventilated for over two weeks before I started sawing on it, so I felt the risk of fire was very minimal in my situation. I hope that any person who would attempt a DIY project of this magnitude would of course do their due diligence also.
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Old 01-27-2014, 12:30 AM   #24
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Seapilot, some years ago, at Alice Springs in remote central Australia, half way through a 16000km car rally, we had a cracked leaking auxiliary gasoline tank successfully welded. We did remove it from the car first. Only one guy would touch it, we were surprised he did, staying well clear while he welded.You should be ok,with planning.
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Old 04-09-2014, 08:46 PM   #25
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I just cut my tanks out... At times the blades on the saws-all got so hot they started smoking, so I'd stop for a minute and keep cutting. Used a sledgehammer to break the welds holding the baffles on.

Take a cup of diesel outside and put a match in it and see what happens.....
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Old 04-11-2014, 05:20 AM   #26
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Sea Moose
In the meantime I finished removing the port dieseltank.
I did it the way seaisleman reported in this forum.
When the sawblade became hot I dipped it in cold water and
could continue sawing immediately.

Best Regards
Seapilot
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Old 04-11-2014, 06:36 AM   #27
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To those who have cut out their old iron tanks: how did you get your new tanks in? In parts, that were then welded within the engine room....or?
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Old 04-11-2014, 08:41 AM   #28
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I went with smaller (many use multiple) tanks so they slid right in with just barely moving one vertical deck support.

Because the new tank bottoms are flat versus shaped like the hull...they sit up on platforms now.
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Old 04-11-2014, 09:20 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquabelle View Post
To those who have cut out their old iron tanks: how did you get your new tanks in? In parts, that were then welded within the engine room....or?
We cut the top of the deck off
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