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Old 11-08-2012, 07:34 PM   #41
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Owned a 40' 1939 wooden boat for 22 years. The main reason we sold her was our age (more difficult and more dangerous to move around the scaffolding, less tolerance to sanding dust and paint fumes, etc), not the boat's age. The boat had been kept up by POs and so the annual maintenance was reasonable. Our "new" 32' plastic boat seems to take at least as much, if not more, annual maintenance time and dollars (just different) as the old woodie. We also benefitted from having the old boat in Maine where wooden boat maintenance skills, materials and advice are very much alive and well and readily available
dwhatty

Looks like that was a beautiful old Matthews you owned... correct? Pictured gliding through Penobscot Bay! Anyway - Having decades background dealing with many wood and glass boats I just can't imagine how you equate wood boat work-time and over-all-efforts on an equal basis with fiberglass boats; both being in good original ownership condition and each originating from good boat builders. So... Camden - Where Mountains Meet the Sea!

Cheers, Art
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Old 11-08-2012, 07:36 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by manyboats
El Sea,
I'd much rather work on a wood hull than a rotten cored deck of a FG boat. And anybody buying any boat should do so w their eyes wide open and having through surveys done irregardless of what the boat was built of. And usually wood boats are worth fixing because in the end you'll have a better boat. Lighter, stronger, better looking, more efficient, quieter and subject to less vibration. Some people think anything that is more modern is better but I will admit there is more painting to be done on a wood boat. But lots of people actually like painting boats. Marin says he does but then he covers up his wood even while cruising?????? I like painting to a degree but prepping is kind of a drag. But for most things (except painting) a wood boat is a better boat.



Ya know, guys... I spent my first 25 + years growing up on, working on and repairing and restoring and refinishing wood boats in New England... so, I well understand the efforts and time and materials and knowledge required. I recommend all boat owners, or wanna be owners, to carefully review all portions of Scary’s (Steve’s) post http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s...raft-6833.html i.e. "I'm about to start a project on an older Chris Craft."

Having visited the boat’s repair site, being shown around and an in-depth discussion with Steve, I saw that Steve and his assistant are doing an exemplary fine job. I can only imagine the completed cost to boat owner... albeit, at completion, the owner will have a like new wooden vessel... Thanks to Steve’s Know How!

Therefore, I respectfully say, to own and care for a well built wood boat as compared to a well built FG boat (wood – vs – FG, although each is maintainable) are different as night and day. In decades past I owned and cared for woodys (my own boats and many other owners’ boats in boat yards; a lot of refinishing and often structurally repairing boat portions with shipwrights). I also worked in a new boat builder’s factory, building both wood and FG boats – up to 65’ loa). I have since owned and cared for fiberglass vessels. Again, I say, wood – vs – FG are different as night and day!

Hendo and manyboats... have you Captains ever owned a well constructed and well designed fiberglass boat in comparison to a woody? If so, what was your experience between the two very different build-out materials’ overall ownership efforts, maintenance, and expense?

May I add, Tolly I currently own has little wood exposed to exterior (only the sliders on each side of salon – rest is FG and SS). And, although I’ve had simple times maintaining/caring-for other FG boats - -> this 1977 Tolly is the easiest by far, also, her original build-out was extremely well done.

I look forward to learn your comparison feelings – IF, in addition to owning and caring for wood boat – you have owned and cared for fiberglass boat too.

Happy Boating Daze! - Art

PS: Bottom pict is wife, daughter and her hubby with a good morning cup-o-jo!
Hi Art,
In response to your question, Yes mate. In fact, all I have ever owned is FG. The timber boat I'm building will be my first woody ( well in the boating sense I mean ) hahaha. So I could argue very strongly on the pro side for FG. I'm a carpenter and I know what I'm getting myself into with regards to preventative maintenance and alike. As much as I would whinge and bitch about having to do things on the woody, I secretly love it as I love doing the up keep on timber. Is it more expensive. Yes. Is it more time consuming? Yes. Is it worth it? Only you can answer that for yourself. For me it's very much worth it.

For ease of maintenance for the weekend boating person then FG would be for you.
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Old 11-08-2012, 07:40 PM   #43
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Hi Art,
In response to your question, Yes mate. In fact, all I have ever owned is FG. The timber boat I'm building will be my first woody ( well in the boating sense I mean ) hahaha. So I could argue very strongly on the pro side for FG. I'm a carpenter and I know what I'm getting myself into with regards to preventative maintenance and alike. As much as I would whinge and bitch about having to do things on the woody, I secretly love it as I love doing the up keep on timber. Is it more expensive. Yes. Is it more time consuming? Yes. Is it worth it? Only you can answer that for yourself. For me it's very much worth it.

For ease of maintenance for the weekend boating person then FG would be for you.
Understood / Agreed!!
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Old 11-08-2012, 07:40 PM   #44
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Also, serious question, what is a cup of joe? ... Is that like a cup of tea? If so, why is it called joe?
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Old 11-08-2012, 07:49 PM   #45
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KKMI of Pt. Richmond, CA advertises its woodworking skills.

Here a 8 or 9 decade-old Bird-class sloop is being rebuilt from the keel up.

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Old 11-08-2012, 07:54 PM   #46
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Also, serious question, what is a cup of joe? ... Is that like a cup of tea? If so, why is it called joe?
"Cup of joe" is an American nickname for coffee. The phrase goes back to the mid-1840s, and is of unclear origin, though it is possibly short for "Old Black Joe," the title of a popular Stephen Foster song. In any case, it predates Josephus Daniels, the Secretary of the Navy who banned the serving of alcohol on ships in 1914.

Another possible origin lies in the birth of America's taste for coffee, which developed in the 19th century after tea was no longer available from British merchants. The phrase may have come into the American English language via a misunderstanding of the French word chaud, which means "hot" and is pronounced similarly.
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Old 11-08-2012, 08:00 PM   #47
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Visit "Spaulding Wooden Boat Center" website... Hella interesting. I've visited and donated before. It's in Sausilto CA, bout 40 minutes from my town.

http://www.spauldingcenter.org/
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Old 11-08-2012, 08:01 PM   #48
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dwhatty

Looks like that was a beautiful old Matthews you owned... correct? Pictured gliding through Penobscot Bay! Anyway - Having decades background dealing with many wood and glass boats I just can't imagine how you equate wood boat work-time and over-all-efforts on an equal basis with fiberglass boats; both being in good original ownership condition and each originating from good boat builders. So... Camden - Where Mountains Meet the Sea!

Cheers, Art
Not a Matthews. A Smith & Gray "one off". Reputedly built for President of Electric Boat Co. Yes, Camden Hills in background and East Penobscot Bay.
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Old 11-08-2012, 08:07 PM   #49
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dwhatty

Looks like that was a beautiful old Matthews you owned... correct? Pictured gliding through Penobscot Bay! Anyway - Having decades background dealing with many wood and glass boats I just can't imagine how you equate wood boat work-time and over-all-efforts on an equal basis with fiberglass boats; both being in good original ownership condition and each originating from good boat builders. So... Camden - Where Mountains Meet the Sea!

Cheers, Art
Not a Matthews. A Smith & Gray (Quaker Hill CT) "one off". Reputedly built for President of Electric Boat Co. Yes, Camden Hills in background and running up East Penobscot Bay. As to work time on a kept up boat (Not necessarilly in original ownership condition. Just well maintained.), I stand by my statement as far as that boat is concerned. I'm spending the same or more hours on our IG maintenance and upgrades than I did on the Woodie. More "systems" than the simple ones in the old boat is part of it.
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Old 11-08-2012, 08:09 PM   #50
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Not a Matthews. A Smith & Gray "one off". Reputedly built for President of Electric Boat Co. Yes, Camden Hills in background and East Penobscot Bay.
Thanks for info

Smith & Gray "one off" WOW - bet she is one stout yet elegant lady. Hull and superstructure lines sure remind me of older Matthews. When you say Electric Boat Co., you referring to Elco boats?
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Old 11-08-2012, 08:15 PM   #51
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Thanks for info

Smith & Gray "one off" WOW - bet she is one stout yet elegant lady. Hull and superstructure lines sure remind me of older Matthews. When you say Electric Boat Co., you referring to Elco boats?
Not Elco but Electric Boat of Groton CN. Think Submarines. Frames were 1 1/2" X 1 1/2" oak every 10". Cedar planked. Yes, reminiscent of Matthews, Elcos and Richardsons.
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Old 11-08-2012, 08:40 PM   #52
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Not Elco but Electric Boat of Groton CN. Think Submarines.
I came close to changing coasts for a job at Electric Boat about twenty years ago. Interesting work but ultimately am glad I left that field.
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Old 11-08-2012, 08:58 PM   #53
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dwhatty,
Thanks for posting another picture of the old boat ... always thrills me to see her. If she had the right power I'd even trade Willy for her. Her wake tells volumes about how easily driven she is for a semi-disp boat. I would have guessed her builder to be Nassau (SP?). Probably had a flathead gas MARINE engine in her originally. My only complaint would probably be poor visibility from the helm. In this age of high fuel costs a FG boat built w the same hull lines would be great for guys like me but most now would want a wider boat requiring much more power. And that would be basically a lobster type. If I was to have a new boat built for myself it could be like your old S&G but w raised pilothouse.
Thanks again for the pic and the comments that are very parallel to my own.
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Old 11-09-2012, 03:32 AM   #54
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"Cup of joe" is an American nickname for coffee. The phrase goes back to the mid-1840s, and is of unclear origin, though it is possibly short for "Old Black Joe," the title of a popular Stephen Foster song. In any case, it predates Josephus Daniels, the Secretary of the Navy who banned the serving of alcohol on ships in 1914.

Another possible origin lies in the birth of America's taste for coffee, which developed in the 19th century after tea was no longer available from British merchants. The phrase may have come into the American English language via a misunderstanding of the French word chaud, which means "hot" and is pronounced similarly.
Ah ok cool. Thanks for the heads up mate :-)
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Old 11-09-2012, 03:39 AM   #55
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:-D besides when a mate calls and asks what I'm doin, I can always freak him out by saying I'm rubbing my hands on my woodie. Doesn't have the same ring to it if I tell him I'm rubbing my plastic hahahahahahahaha :-D
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Old 11-09-2012, 06:50 AM   #56
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:-D besides when a mate calls and asks what I'm doin, I can always freak him out by saying I'm rubbing my hands on my woodie. Doesn't have the same ring to it if I tell him I'm rubbing my plastic hahahahahahahaha :-D
They make steel, aluminum and rubber ones too, ya know! But I digress... LOL

So - Who is the manufacturer of boat on your avitar? That your standard ride, errrr float? Art
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Old 11-09-2012, 07:41 AM   #57
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dwhatty,
Thanks for posting another picture of the old boat ... always thrills me to see her. If she had the right power I'd even trade Willy for her. Her wake tells volumes about how easily driven she is for a semi-disp boat. I would have guessed her builder to be Nassau (SP?). Probably had a flathead gas MARINE engine in her originally. My only complaint would probably be poor visibility from the helm. In this age of high fuel costs a FG boat built w the same hull lines would be great for guys like me but most now would want a wider boat requiring much more power. And that would be basically a lobster type. If I was to have a new boat built for myself it could be like your old S&G but w raised pilothouse.
Thanks again for the pic and the comments that are very parallel to my own.
Eric:

Don't know how she was originally powered (obviously gas) but in the early '70's one of her PO's (who was the owner of a marine engine business) put twin Chrysler Nissan 6 cyl diesels in her. The plate on the engines said something like 52 hp @ ? (can't recall the rpm) and 73hp @ 3,300 rpm). Never ran them over 2,800 and most times @ 2,400. She burned 1.4 gph per engine at 2,400 at 7.9 kts.

It was obvious that she also originally had had a single, center, rudder but when we bought her she had twin spade rudders.
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Old 11-09-2012, 08:01 AM   #58
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They make steel, aluminum and rubber ones too, ya know! But I digress... LOL

So - Who is the manufacturer of boat on your avitar? That your standard ride, errrr float? Art
ROFL hahahahahahahaha good to see someone else has a good sense of humour lol.

The boat in the avatar is a Integrity 330. It's an Australian made vessel. My project is based on this boat except mines a woddie. Atm you can't tell to look at it but I'll do my best to get pretty close to it, which reminds me, I better upload some more pics to the album ay :-D
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Old 11-09-2012, 10:24 AM   #59
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dwhatty,
Sounds like a good repower to me and the fuel burn sounds about right.
What was her disp and speed?
I think Albin used the same engine on many of their 27' boats. I had a Nissan Maxima (80s) car w a 6 cyl diesel. Sold it as I couldn't stand the racket. Got 40mpg though. Running around town w very light load it was unbearably noisy. Going up a hill w my foot in it it was amazingly quiet. I suspect the noise issue was related to the type of fuel injection it had.
Thanks again for posting the picture.
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Old 11-09-2012, 10:35 AM   #60
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dwhatty,
Sounds like a good repower to me and the fuel burn sounds about right.
What was her disp and speed?
She weighed around 13,000 lbs per TravelLift gauge. Never ran the engines at 3,300 rated WOT in 22 years but at 2,800 she'd do about 9 kts and 7.9 kts at 2,400.
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