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Old 10-18-2012, 09:11 PM   #21
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I hear you motion30.
Your FG boat says that too.
They say Americans are workaholics but they clearly don't like working on their own things. Look at consumer reports on cars. They report on the frequency of problems paying no attention to the severity of the problems. In other words just how inconvenient are they. There's no report on how difficult they are to repair either. Just "how often do they have a problem".
I wonder what the biggest reason the wood boat fell out of popularity? It's either the maint issue or the labor intensive element of boat manufacture. Of course it's both but what was the biggest reason?
Still if I was halving a new boat built for me it would probably be wood. But I'm sure I could buy a FG one cheaper or bigger.
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Old 11-05-2012, 08:35 PM   #22
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A lot to take in. What I do gather, is wood is harder to take care of. Some of these old girls are really pretty.

Thank you for all the input.
Bill
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Old 11-06-2012, 07:45 AM   #23
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Let me weigh in on seaworthiness and fuel economy.

In addition to Fred's comment about glass thickness, you need to think about the beefiness of the superstructure. From the pictures I see lots of window area and not a lot of beef around them. Also IMO I wouldn't take any non ballasted trawler across the Atlantic. That boat would need tons of ballast to make it suitable. Remember it was designed as a harbor launch and now has much more weight up top.

Fuel economy should be in the three gph range and that should give you 7 kts which is well below hull speed. So a transatlantic passage is theoretically possible, but read above again.

I am puzzled why the person who converted her to a trawler put such big fuel tanks in. Maybe he addressed the problems noted above. But maybe not.

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Old 11-06-2012, 08:17 AM   #24
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Bill.
First, I had a wood boat, 40 ft, quality built, twin GM 6V53s and I would not do it again, PERIOD.
Plus a freind had a 50 ft wood sail boat with a GM 3 53 his boat was next to mine for years, so I can attest to the amount of work and expensive work required even if doing it yourself. As one said, just finding materials is a job and expensive. Dont even contemplate paying someone to do it, if you can even find a boat carpenter.
Hey, this is my EXPERIENCE and as always YMMV
The engine is bullet proof but the wood, and the pics indicate that a "quick sloppy" paint job was done to the boat, my observation only, for the sale?
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Old 11-06-2012, 09:19 AM   #25
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Howdy and Ahoy!

I recommend before you purchase a BIG old wood boat that you read this entire thread titled: " I'm about to start a project on an older Chris Craft"... the link is below: "

Be SURE to see the rot repair pictures on pgs 1 thru 4. Now, I'm not saying that the Navy boat you are looking at is in same condition - BUT - You'd best make sure it isn't before purchase... or you'll enter into a world of hurt!

http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s...raft-6833.html

Good Luck! - Art
Just for S&G I recommend you again visit the link above, and be very careful to read the all posts from Steve, i.e. “Scary”. Since I originally posted my precaution onto this thread Scary has come a long way in WOOD ROT repairs, with even more great picts now posted. As Steve mentions... “At last the final planks are in. Just two new Gunnels and Spray Rails and we get to start on the bottom refastening.” I know from personal experience that this added task could run into even more tens of thousands$$$ (depending on many "bottom" conditions)... in addition to the tens of thousands$$$ already incurred from WOOD ROT and its FASTENER repairs on hull sides and adjoining gunnels/decks. Then thousands$$$ more in repainting entire craft.

Long and short of big ol’ wood boats... work/money, work/money, work/money... then of course deep love for your craft for a while until you too soon again renter into work/money, work/money. It becomes a hate love relationship. BTW, in New England states during 1960’s and 70’s I worked with shipwrights in boat yards repairing and restoring wooden boats. My family had wood boats. I well understand what Scary is accomplishing and I know of what I speak.

My recommendation is for you to search Yachtworld and other sales venue to locate a real good condition older FG vessel. Tollycraft / Uniflite / Hatteras / Bertram / Chris Craft... to mention a few builders of high repute and known construction quality. There are deals to be had due to economic conditions. Don’t be afraid to offer low on any boat... it will surprise you what people will accept, some simply want to get out from underneath a vessel they no longer use... worst you can get is a no from the owner. Then simply keep looking. Most important item to keep in mind of originally good quality builders’ older boats is the previous owner’s maintenance schedule and the current condition of all boat portions. When you find one that really seems like a boat you want to own be sure to have it checked fully by a reputable marine surveyor and reputable marine mechanic. That is more than worth the money in the short run and long run of owning any boat – via their reports you pretty much know what you’re getting into! Also, be sure to be right there with both “boat condition checkers” as they perform the task and ask as many questions as you can think of. Carry clip board for placing items they say... just remember, they work for you; you are paying them and have every right to make them work for their money.

Happy Boating Daze! - Art
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Old 11-07-2012, 06:14 AM   #26
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What I do gather, is wood is harder to take care of.

Harder in 2 ways , the paint and seals must be 100% perfect / 100% of the time.

There can never be delay between a leak and its repair.

Otherwise the boat dissolves in "dry rot".

The skill set to replace a piece of the boat like a holed plank is far higher than a mere GRP repair.

The easiest is steel, chop and weld , but steel comes with many other hassles.

SOLID GRP is probably best for someone that does not wish to spend years developing repair skills , and just go cruising.
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Old 11-07-2012, 09:49 AM   #27
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What I do gather, is wood is harder to take care of.

Harder in 2 ways , the paint and seals must be 100% perfect / 100% of the time.

There can never be delay between a leak and its repair.

Otherwise the boat dissolves in "dry rot".

The skill set to replace a piece of the boat like a holed plank is far higher than a mere GRP repair.

The easiest is steel, chop and weld , but steel comes with many other hassles.

SOLID GRP is probably best for someone that does not wish to spend years developing repair skills , and just go cruising.
Fred - SOOO Correct! - Art
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Old 11-07-2012, 02:10 PM   #28
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1955 US Navy Trawler Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

This trawler is posted on Yacht World. Believe it to be a new listing.
Tell me what you think, rip it apart if you must.
What I'm seeing;

A good DD 971
Huge aft deck for scuba diving and drinking. (Not at the same time)
Large fuel tanks. Would this boat get two miles to a gallon?
Small holding tank,,, really 12 gallons, can that be correct?
What about the wood hull, how much of a problem is that?
Has an extra gen set,,,,
Can it cross the Pacific?

Looking forward to your repies,

Bill W.



Unless you are going to ship the boat, most of the boat that you are looking at and price range will have the range and stability. As mentioned before for your price and range the best is to look at commercial, a commercial that been converted to pleasure or a pleasure built on/in a commercial hull/builder. Maybe looking at sail boat and/or motor sailor as they have stability and range. Also if you are going to ship then under 40 ft L X 12 ft and as a low as possible.


At least buy a boat that can be maintained in your area.
The size, weight and what the boat is made of depends a lot on what service and yard capacity/capability are on Marshall Island.
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Old 11-07-2012, 02:24 PM   #29
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Reminds me of John Wayne's boat the "Wild Goose" a former navy mine sweeper. No matter how much money he put into it, it was never a "luxury yacht."
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Old 11-07-2012, 05:10 PM   #30
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No matter how much money he put into it, it was never a "luxury yacht."
That statement leads me to believe you have never been on either type.

Those converted wooden minesweepers made beautiful yachts with interiors that few modern production yachts - even the 50 meter and over boats - seldom match.

They make superb PNW boats because of seakeeping, material characteristics, and the style in which they were usually converted and decorated by people who appreciated the beauty of the materials, climate, and geography.

They don't "work" any better cruising the Riviera than a 50 meter Italian go fast jet boat works cruising SE Alaska.

The only boats I have ever been on to match them in character and decor are large custom built Dutch yachts with owners in the "old money" fraternity who have as much taste as cash to invest in their boats.
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Old 11-07-2012, 07:29 PM   #31
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Reminds me of John Wayne's boat the "Wild Goose" a former navy mine sweeper. No matter how much money he put into it, it was never a "luxury yacht."
Good friend of mine (Navy Seal) told me about his encounter with John Wayne and his Navy vessel conversion. Back when... while my friend was cruising a 36' Uniflite a big storm arose. In a harbor his anchor broke loose and he needed to go under power. On the SS he heard a call from Captain of JW's vessel and was invited to tie broadside to weather the storm. Upon doing so John himself helped my friend and his lady aboard. The three drank long hours into the night in John's "special" room while his crew tended to both boats needs. My friend said John's boat was an astounding conversion and that Mr. Wayne was a great fellow to chat with. He also mentioned the exquisite service provided by wait staff. One thing that blew his mind was that when he again met the head of staff years later the fellow remembered my friend's name. This post is a little off topic, but, an interesting slice of life seeing as John’s boat has been referred to a couple times!

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Old 11-07-2012, 07:54 PM   #32
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those old moine sweepers had all bronze fastings, heavy planking no metal fastings that would draw a mine to it, a freind of mine scraped a few of them and did all right selling the bronze
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Old 11-08-2012, 01:42 AM   #33
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Reminds me of John Wayne's boat the "Wild Goose" a former navy mine sweeper. No matter how much money he put into it, it was never a "luxury yacht."
This account seems to contradict your conclusion.

http://www.urbandesirecruises.com/wi...rticle-udc.pdf
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Old 11-08-2012, 04:17 AM   #34
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those old moine sweepers had all bronze fastings ...
They also had stainless steel engines and bronze reduction gear housings. Here is one undergoing some work ... the boxy thing on the left is the oil filter and sump.
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Old 11-08-2012, 06:28 AM   #35
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For DD fans there were aluminum 71 blocks that accepted the std parts.
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Old 11-08-2012, 09:51 AM   #36
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Its wood unless you are young and want to spend all your free time in upkeep then do not make an offer
Pffft lol.
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Old 11-08-2012, 09:56 AM   #37
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El Sea,
I'd much rather work on a wood hull than a rotten cored deck of a FG boat. And anybody buying any boat should do so w their eyes wide open and having through surveys done irregardless of what the boat was built of. And usually wood boats are worth fixing because in the end you'll have a better boat. Lighter, stronger, better looking, more efficient, quieter and subject to less vibration. Some people think anything that is more modern is better but I will admit there is more painting to be done on a wood boat. But lots of people actually like painting boats. Marin says he does but then he covers up his wood even while cruising?????? I like painting to a degree but prepping is kind of a drag. But for most things (except painting) a wood boat is a better boat.
Couldn't have said it better myself. Well said :-D
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Old 11-08-2012, 11:21 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by manyboats
El Sea,
I'd much rather work on a wood hull than a rotten cored deck of a FG boat. And anybody buying any boat should do so w their eyes wide open and having through surveys done irregardless of what the boat was built of. And usually wood boats are worth fixing because in the end you'll have a better boat. Lighter, stronger, better looking, more efficient, quieter and subject to less vibration. Some people think anything that is more modern is better but I will admit there is more painting to be done on a wood boat. But lots of people actually like painting boats. Marin says he does but then he covers up his wood even while cruising?????? I like painting to a degree but prepping is kind of a drag. But for most things (except painting) a wood boat is a better boat.

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Couldn't have said it better myself. Well said :-D


Ya know, guys... I spent my first 25 + years growing up on, working on and repairing and restoring and refinishing wood boats in New England... so, I well understand the efforts and time and materials and knowledge required. I recommend all boat owners, or wanna be owners, to carefully review all portions of Scary’s (Steve’s) post http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s32/im-about-start-project-older-chriscraft-6833.html i.e. "I'm about to start a project on an older Chris Craft."

Having visited the boat’s repair site, being shown around and an in-depth discussion with Steve, I saw that Steve and his assistant are doing an exemplary fine job. I can only imagine the completed cost to boat owner... albeit, at completion, the owner will have a like new wooden vessel... Thanks to Steve’s Know How!

Therefore, I respectfully say, to own and care for a well built wood boat as compared to a well built FG boat (wood – vs – FG, although each is maintainable) are different as night and day. In decades past I owned and cared for woodys (my own boats and many other owners’ boats in boat yards; a lot of refinishing and often structurally repairing boat portions with shipwrights). I also worked in a new boat builder’s factory, building both wood and FG boats – up to 65’ loa). I have since owned and cared for fiberglass vessels. Again, I say, wood – vs – FG are different as night and day!

Hendo and manyboats... have you Captains ever owned a well constructed and well designed fiberglass boat in comparison to a woody? If so, what was your experience between the two very different build-out materials’ overall ownership efforts, maintenance, and expense?

May I add, Tolly I currently own has little wood exposed to exterior (only the sliders on each side of salon – rest is FG and SS). And, although I’ve had simple times maintaining/caring-for other FG boats - -> this 1977 Tolly is the easiest by far, also, her original build-out was extremely well done.

I look forward to learn your comparison feelings – IF, in addition to owning and caring for wood boat – you have owned and cared for fiberglass boat too.

Happy Boating Daze! - Art

PS: Bottom pict is wife, daughter and her hubby with a good morning cup-o-jo!
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Old 11-08-2012, 02:04 PM   #39
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I haven't had a larger wood boat Art but have lots of experience w small OB types ... ply and plank both. I'm not trying to tell folks wood boats are easy to keep up but only that the difference between wood maint and FG maint is MUCH less than most comments here have led folks to believe. An all FG boat like my Albin is one thing but most all FG boats are very dependent on lots of very significant wood parts to hold the weak plastic together. And most all of these wood structural parts are very hard to get to and replace. Replacing wood parts on a wood boat is a walk in the park compared. I'm always worried my plywood in my decks and cabin aren't rotting while I think about it. It has been said that every little leak in a wood boat needs to be fixed immediately ... well exactly the same thing is true on a FG boat the big difference is that on the wood boat you can see it and fix it much more easily. But I'm not recommending anybody here get a wood boat. It's hard to find boatyards where people know wood boats much less individual owners. And not to be forgotten is the fact that almost all wood boats now are very old ... and getting older. But after a bit of research and of course a good survey I'd buy a 32 GB woodie without much of any worries about whether or not I was making a mistake.
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Old 11-08-2012, 05:37 PM   #40
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Owned a 40' 1939 wooden boat for 22 years. The main reason we sold her was our age (more difficult and more dangerous to move around the scaffolding, less tolerance to sanding dust and paint fumes, etc), not the boat's age. The boat had been kept up by POs and so the annual maintenance was reasonable. Our "new" 32' plastic boat seems to take at least as much, if not more, annual maintenance time and dollars (just different) as the old woodie. We also benefitted from having the old boat in Maine where wooden boat maintenance skills, materials and advice are very much alive and well and readily available
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