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Old 01-19-2015, 08:48 PM   #21
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You know, before we bought our 2005 400 trawler, I was worried about the poor reputation for quality that Mainship has but we just felt that boat checked more of our boxes than anything else we looked at that was even close to our price range.

I realize you are not looking at our exact boat, but I can tell you that I have been pretty pleased with the build quality of our boat. It is not perfect (perhaps you have stumbled upon my post about the crazy wiring for the fwd cabin lights) but I really haven't found anything major. We have had the boat two years now, and have put about 400 hours on it.

Just from looking around at a lot of Mainships, it seems to me that they improved their overall quality about 2003 or 2004. I don't mean to dis anyone's boat, but the 400 has a lot of things that I much prefer from a build and design standpoint to the older 340/390 which went out of production around 2003.

For us, a big thing was that they use quality components for the most part. A Vacuflush head is a Vacuflush head wether it is in a Mainship or a Nordhaven.

We looked at the Back Cove a little as well, I just couldn't do without a flybridge and the $ were quite a bit more.

One advantage of buying a used Mainship is that there are a lot of them around, so you can play one off of the other to your negotiating advantage. That is what we did and bought our boat about 15% below the market.

Sorry to ramble, and I hope this helps.

Doug
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Old 01-21-2015, 05:19 AM   #22
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Good stuff Doug!
Thanks,
Dick
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Old 01-23-2015, 10:02 AM   #23
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What engines are fitted to Mainship 34s in USA? There is a 2008 for sale here with a single 380hp Yanmar. Seems excessive for a trawler, maybe not if they are really intended to plane.
And we have to be careful in what kind of boats we are talking about. Pretty much all PILOTS were meant to plane. Earl's 34T probably barely planes. The "trawlers" with the twin 240s will plane easily. I would assume that People with the 34T singles cruise their boats off plane. I would agree. Personally, if the boat is not gonna plane, it should be equipped with a smaller engine. If it is meant to plane, it should be equipped with a larger engine. The same was the issue with the 350/390. Most of those were equipped with a Cat 300hp. Those likely go 12 knots balls out making a bunch of noise and wake....when a 140hp NA John Deere would have been just about right. Anyway....a big Mainship fan here. I just wish the management would have listened to the architects/engineers and not so much the marketing folks.
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Old 01-23-2015, 10:56 AM   #24
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You also have to be honest with yourself in how you are going to use it. If all you are going to do is use it mostly as a day boat....then the 30 will serve wonderfully!!! If you are going to spend a lot of time overnight.....then I would stretch for the 34.
That is sage advice! I had a 99 Pilot 30 that I loved. (My wife did not!) I used it almost exclusively as a day boat for fishing.

No one has mentioned how "tender" the Pilot 30 is. When taking a wake, abeam, the boat rocks almost uncontrollably and I have had the s_ _t scared out of me on several occasions. Always cross a wake at an angle or straight on if possible. (It would be nice if the ocean waves cooperated in this regard.) Baker's advice about stepping up to the 34 is right on the money. I wish I had done that and not opted for the less expensive 30.

Summary: The Pilot 30 is a great little boat with the operative word being "little." You (and your wife?) will be much happier in a 34.
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Old 01-23-2015, 03:39 PM   #25
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That is sage advice! I had a 99 Pilot 30 that I loved. (My wife did not!) I used it almost exclusively as a day boat for fishing.

No one has mentioned how "tender" the Pilot 30 is. When taking a wake, abeam, the boat rocks almost uncontrollably and I have had the s_ _t scared out of me on several occasions. Always cross a wake at an angle or straight on if possible. (It would be nice if the ocean waves cooperated in this regard.) Baker's advice about stepping up to the 34 is right on the money. I wish I had done that and not opted for the less expensive 30.

Summary: The Pilot 30 is a great little boat with the operative word being "little." You (and your wife?) will be much happier in a 34.
I'm also interested in buying a Pilot 30 (looking at Albin 28s too) and I've seen other places where you mentioned the boat being tender in beam seas. Has anyone else experienced that or was that unique to Codger's boat? The only thing I'm concerned about is the seakeeping characteristics of this boat. Would you guys say this boat is offshore capable -- at least up to 50 miles out in 3'-4' seas? Would we be able to make it back in safely if things got a bit rougher than that (e.g, 6')?

I prefer the looks and interior and cockpit arrangement of the Pilot over the Albins, but I've read nothing but praise for the rough water handling capabilities of the Albin.
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Old 01-23-2015, 04:18 PM   #26
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Greetings,
Hey, Mr. J...Welcome aboard.
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Old 01-23-2015, 06:20 PM   #27
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I prefer the looks and interior and cockpit arrangement of the Pilot over the Albins, but I've read nothing but praise for the rough water handling capabilities of the Albin.
I agree on the interior and cockpit comment but can't comment on the Albin other than I've heard the same thing.
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Old 01-23-2015, 09:32 PM   #28
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I'm also interested in buying a Pilot 30 (looking at Albin 28s too) and I've seen other places where you mentioned the boat being tender in beam seas. Has anyone else experienced that or was that unique to Codger's boat? The only thing I'm concerned about is the seakeeping characteristics of this boat. Would you guys say this boat is offshore capable -- at least up to 50 miles out in 3'-4' seas? Would we be able to make it back in safely if things got a bit rougher than that (e.g, 6')?

I prefer the looks and interior and cockpit arrangement of the Pilot over the Albins, but I've read nothing but praise for the rough water handling capabilities of the Albin.
I would say the Mainship is at least a very good sea boat bordering on excellent. I never really felt it was all that tender in a beam sea....UNLESS....you were not on plane. Being on plane stabilizes the boat significantly...that could be said for any planing boat. I will also say that mine was a 2004...and the other guy a 1999. If you read my previous review, the hulls were different. Not terribly but still there were different. The boat has a very deep entry and slowly flattening out as you go aft. I think the newer boats got flatter quicker which gave them better planing performance and could possibly give them better initial stability. I also personally believe that the hull work Mainship did produced a positive impact on performance with no real downside. In theory the flatter hull might pound but I never experienced any pounding and I operated that boat for 800+ hours. To answer your question, I would have no problem taking it offshore. The deep forefoot cuts right thru the weather. And because it cuts right through it and it is a relatively small boat, the ride can be wet.... no comida gratis!!!

How does it compare to the Albin 28??? In reality, I don't know. I do know the Albin is designed on a more planing hull...IOW...an even flatter hull. That would give it potentially more speed but it could pound into a head sea. I cross shopped the Albins a well. They are good boats and I would say better built!!! BUT...like y'all.....I did not like the layout. It was even smaller. And if curb appeal matters, the Mainship is a much better looking boat. My boat had the tan gelcoat which really made it look great...IMO.

If my choice was to buy the A28 or the Pilot 30 again, I would choose the Pilot 30 again. I absolutely loved the boat. You just simply cannot beat a 30 foot planing boat that gets about 3MPG(6GPH@15kts) and is so easy to operate and maintain!!! My only knock, as I previously stated, was it was a bit too small for me for overnighting.
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Old 01-23-2015, 09:39 PM   #29
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I mean....COME ON MAN....that is just a flat out damn good looking boat!!!
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Old 01-24-2015, 08:20 AM   #30
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I mean....COME ON MAN....that is just a flat out damn good looking boat!!!
Agreed! She's beautiful. I read your other reviews of this boat and found them very informative. Thanks for the additional comments. This decision is getting easier...
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Old 02-26-2015, 08:49 AM   #31
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We have an offer in on a 2005 Pilot 34 with twin Yanmar 240s. Does anyone know the fuel burn on a boat equipped like this?
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Old 02-26-2015, 09:05 AM   #32
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Have a good look at the exhaust system for drainage into rather than out of turbos. Water ingress into #6 cylinder can be an issue. Dave Marchand knows well of this subject.
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Old 02-26-2015, 09:42 AM   #33
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I will note this to the engine surveyor, thanks sunchaser!
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Old 02-26-2015, 10:16 AM   #34
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I can't speak specifically about the twins, but in pictures I have seen the exhaust geometry is similar to the single. And many surveyors don't pay much attention (just like boat builders) to this problem.

Here is what you can do to check it yourself:

Look at the mixer- the stainless steel device where raw water mixes with the exhaust. It has an internal space where raw water enters and mixes with the exhaust at the end near the hose connection. Visualize what happens when the engine shuts down. Unless the mixer is oriented properly, the jacket will retain water. This will increase corrosion and if it ultimately fails inside, that water will run back into your turbo.

The other issue is height. Look at the height of the lower wall of the exhaust gas loop- the spill over point. That height should be at least 12" above the water line. You can easily find the water line by opening the strainer and noting the water height and compare it to the "spill over point".

The attached pic describes this graphically.

With the single, I cruise at 14-15 kts at 2,800 rpm and max out at about 19 kts at 3,300 rpm. The Yanmar twins are higher rpm engines- 3,800 max and should cruise at 16 kts at 3,200 rpm and max out a bit over 20 at 3,800.

It should burn about 15 gph at 16 kts cruise speed.

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Old 02-26-2015, 10:26 AM   #35
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Thanks, David, much appreciated.
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Old 02-26-2015, 10:31 AM   #36
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Other than relocating the engines or the mixer, is there any cure for this issue? Does Mainship know about it?

I had a similar situation with a 2002 Regal I owned. Ruined both gas inboards. The manufacturer ended up giving me 2 new engines. Luckily it was a new boat, under warranty.
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Old 02-26-2015, 10:48 AM   #37
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Other than relocating the engines or the mixer, is there any cure for this issue? Does Mainship know about it?.
Per Dave's post, the right mixer height is essential, few surveyors know or care about this issue so be vigil. Redoing the exhaust/mixer run to gain the height is a good idea - and costs a bit of $$. If the engines check out OK and you otherwise like the vessel price in the mixer/exhaust run redo to your negotiations.

Yes, Mainship knew but with their several years of financial issues no good recourse was available to buyers if problems showed up.
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Old 02-26-2015, 10:58 AM   #38
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ljk:

The fix is fairly easy for the single- weld in an 8" riser extension and orient the mixer so it will drain. Cost less than a boat buck to have it fabricated.

But I don't know about the twin. At least on one side the mixer will be under the deck and not the deck opening. And is there room to orient the mixer so it will drain?

And since you asked, the lack of access is why I passed on a twin when we were looking.

FWIW I added a pic to my post above.

I can't say what Mainship knew or didn't know. But like your Regal it is a common problem. For 90% of owners they don't moor in conditions where water can back up. And for those that do get water backing up 90% of those don't know it, yet.

Mine backed up during the pre purchase survey haul out- the Travelift operator pulled the stern higher than the bow and water sloshed forward. I discovered it a few days later when I took delivery and did an oil test and it showed high sodium.

David
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Old 02-26-2015, 11:06 AM   #39
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Excellent info, gentlemen, thanks again.
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Old 04-23-2015, 12:45 PM   #40
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(The other issue is height. Look at the height of the lower wall of the exhaust gas loop- the spill over point. That height should be at least 12" above the water line. You can easily find the water line by opening the strainer and noting the water height and compare it to the "spill over point".)


David,
Pardon the dumb question but you open the strainer lid and measure the height of the water coming out of the strainer to the lower elbow?
Just want to make sure I'm understanding?
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