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Old 01-23-2016, 04:06 PM   #21
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That's not the strange lay down engine. Just a regular 6.354T. Cloth is just thermal insulation on dry turbo and exh pipe. Sea water cooled exhaust manifold, a bit iffy there.
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Old 01-23-2016, 08:44 PM   #22
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Ok.

As a former Mainship 1 owner, take heed about what I am about to say.

The dealers, upon receipt in late 70's on as a general rule did not seal the decks as they drilled and rigged. Meaning water and more water in the fly bridge and cockpit decks to destroy the end grain balsa core. Off the bridge 10 buckets of mush and water, same for cockpit floor. Cross member under worn out sliding glass door done and sagging, bitch to fic. New door, $1200 to $5k.Far more work and expense than engine issues by far. The monkey fur in the v berth is likely eat up from age an mildew. The furring for the headliner in the galley is rotten due to water leaks and of course the headliner is dead. The headliner in the cabin, if careful can be removed and be used as a pattern to easily build a new one and cover.

The fuel tanks can easily be removed ported and cleaned, exterior expoxy And cloth coated. If this has not been done, it WILL BE. Most if not all of the electrical cable terminations will need to be cut off and replaced terminating into a new breaker panel. The 1 3/8 in shaft may have deterioration and need replacing as the cutlas bearing, ditto prop. Then we get to the cosmetics...

The story above I lived and most '78 to 86 Mainships suffer from the above, find one that the fixes have already been done. Otherwise, run, run, run.
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Old 01-25-2016, 06:37 PM   #23
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@ski, what do you mean by "iffy" about the exhaust manifold?
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Old 01-26-2016, 01:13 PM   #24
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That is a standard T6.354 Perkins. The white is a thermal blanket for the turbo and riser.
By the way I have seen probably 50 or more old Mainships and never saw a horizontal model Perkins.
I ran one for 14 years and yes they are great boats. I regret ever selling mine.

The exhaust manifolds are raw water cooled. When they fail half fail externally no big deal, but the other half fail internally and when they do it will take the engine out most likely (you'll get water in the cylinders).
The manifolds are very pricey ($2000+) and sometimes difficult to obtain.
Same with the intercoolers.
Aftermarket units are available from a couple of sources, but are still pricey.


And the flybridge core issue is fairly easy to fix if you are a do it yourselfer. If you want more info on that e mail me privately.
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Old 01-26-2016, 04:04 PM   #25
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The 200hp Perkins has an aluminum inter cooler-heat exchanger, cannot remember which or both. I heard horror stories of $7k. My boat was repowered by previous owner with a 5.9 Cummins for that very reason. If you are going to do this DO not get one with the 200 hp. The 165 Perkins has plenty of power and there are reasonably priced parts.

I did not mention re wool ing all the windows, the leaky de lamited deck next to the forward mast, which is what did in the galley overhead.

There is a Yahoo Mainship Owners Website, with many pictures and every imaginable thing discussed with hundreds of strings and subjects.
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Old 03-11-2016, 06:48 PM   #26
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We bought a 1979 Mainship MK1 about 8 years ago. We like it a lot. The 160hp Perkins is very reliable. Starts instantly and has never failed us. I removed the fuel tanks and had them rebuilt. This activity got rid of the crud on the inside and assures they are good condition and will not leak. I think I spent about $300 on each tank rebuild. Over the years I have completed preventive maintenance on the "add-ons". One year I replaced the exhaust manifold; about$1000. The following year the intercooler; again about $1000. The following year I cleaned, inspected and pressure tested the heat exchanger. Next year the starter. I do these each year during the winter when the boat is layed up. I feel that preventive maintenance helps me avoid problems at in-opportune times. We've had many summers of carefree boating cruising to many ports all around Lake Michigan. The Mainship MK1 is a great boat.
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Old 03-11-2016, 08:56 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tumblehome View Post
We bought a 1979 Mainship MK1 about 8 years ago. We like it a lot. The 160hp Perkins is very reliable. Starts instantly and has never failed us. I removed the fuel tanks and had them rebuilt. This activity got rid of the crud on the inside and assures they are good condition and will not leak. I think I spent about $300 on each tank rebuild. Over the years I have completed preventive maintenance on the "add-ons". One year I replaced the exhaust manifold; about$1000. The following year the intercooler; again about $1000. The following year I cleaned, inspected and pressure tested the heat exchanger. Next year the starter. I do these each year during the winter when the boat is layed up. I feel that preventive maintenance helps me avoid problems at in-opportune times. We've had many summers of carefree boating cruising to many ports all around Lake Michigan. The Mainship MK1 is a great boat.

How did you remove and rebuild the fuel tanks for that price? Mine are OK for now but who knows what the future holds.
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Old 03-11-2016, 09:29 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by tumblehome View Post
We bought a 1979 Mainship MK1 about 8 years ago. We like it a lot. The 160hp Perkins is very reliable. Starts instantly and has never failed us. I removed the fuel tanks and had them rebuilt. This activity got rid of the crud on the inside and assures they are good condition and will not leak. I think I spent about $300 on each tank rebuild. Over the years I have completed preventive maintenance on the "add-ons". One year I replaced the exhaust manifold; about$1000. The following year the intercooler; again about $1000. The following year I cleaned, inspected and pressure tested the heat exchanger. Next year the starter. I do these each year during the winter when the boat is layed up. I feel that preventive maintenance helps me avoid problems at in-opportune times. We've had many summers of carefree boating cruising to many ports all around Lake Michigan. The Mainship MK1 is a great boat.
Overall they are not just great boats, but very great boats, they have weaknesses, documented weaknesses, so upon purchase your eyes should be open.
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Old 03-11-2016, 09:48 PM   #29
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The HT6-354 is a horizontal engine that was originally built as a generator. There were two basic versions. a 3-ring and a 5-ring. If you are fortunate enough to find a 5-ring they were designed to run 24hrs. per day. My 1971 5-ring had 8,000 hours on it when I got it and I added 12,000 more. It went to 20,000 hours before a very minor slap in #6 caused me to rebuild it (I'm anal). It would probably have run another 10,000 hours before it actually needed a rebuild. Even the 3-ring should be good for 25,000 hrs. if properly cared for. All parts other than the heat exchangers are available at farm equipment supply outfits.

In Canada, farm equipment gets a 30% subsidy. Most parts are easy to come by and are much cheaper than "marine" diesel parts. On rare occasions I purchased parts very reasonably from TAD. An entire rebuild kit including cams, pistons, main bearings, cylinders etc. can be had for around $4k in Canadian dollarettes.
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Old 03-12-2016, 04:51 AM   #30
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I removed each fuel tank myself. There is a plywood "panel" in the salon sole that is fairly easy to remove. Wood screws hold it in place. I disconnected the wires and the hoses. With tin snips I cut the banding that hold the tanks down to the tank beds. I lifted each tank up and out of the boat and transported to my garage where I fabricated three access ports in the top. Getting inside allowed me to clean out the crud and inspect the condition of the aluminum. There were lots of pock marks on the bottoms inside. So I took it to a local welding fabrication shop. It's a small two-man operation with many years experience welding aluminum and steel. I should clarify that the bill from the welding fabricator was about $300. He cut out the bottom and welded in a new one. Also pressure tested it for leaks. I spent another $150 or $200 for materials to fabricate the access ports, buy new sending unit and new filler hose. I had cut the hold-down banding in such a way that I could re-use the same ones. Just had to locate the banding "clips" and a crimping tool. I mounted the tank on 1/4" spacers so that air flows under the tank. The addition of the access ports and the spacers are the only variation from factory installation.
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