Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-22-2019, 12:54 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
City: marco island
Country: usa
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 101
bilge blower

My Mainship Bilge blower failed...I never used it....can anyone tell me why Mainship put a bilge blower in a diesel boat.
__________________
Advertisement

jann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2019, 01:00 PM   #2
Guru
 
Xsbank's Avatar
 
City: Pender Harbour, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Gwaii Haanas
Vessel Model: Vancouver Shipyards Custom Aluminum 52
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3,102
Engine room/ambient air cooling?
__________________

Xsbank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2019, 01:08 PM   #3
Guru
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Country: US
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 3,414
Where is it mounted? Up high it is to suck out heat after a run and also diesel smells when the engine room is hot.
Comodave is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2019, 01:12 PM   #4
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 4,813
And if down low, to evacuate battery gasses.
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2019, 01:28 PM   #5
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 11,995
Greetings,
Mr./Ms. j. Mainship also made gas models. Perhaps they put blowers in all their builds.
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2019, 01:53 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
City: Hughesville, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Branwen
Vessel Model: Hatteras 48 LRC
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 332
My diesel boat has them with the placards near the switches that 'require' them to be turned on while refueling and some number of minutes before starting, just like my gas boat. Was it a requirement when the boats were built, possibly regardless the engine type? The operator's manual advises running them after engine shutdown to cool the engine room.


In fact, I just remembered, that one of them wouldn't run was a ding on my purchase survey that the insurance company insisted be fixed before the delivery trip. Go figure.
GregBrannon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2019, 12:35 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
porman's Avatar
 
City: Duvall, Wa
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Beach Music II
Vessel Model: 2003 Mainship 430 Trawler
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 424
Our manual also says to run it after shutdown to cool the engine compartment. No mention of running it during fueling.
porman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2019, 01:36 PM   #8
Guru
 
City: Between Oregon and Alaska
Country: US
Vessel Name: Charlie Harper
Vessel Model: Wheeler Shipyard 83'
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 1,304
On diesel powered big boats and ships there are usually large powered blowers for both intake and exhaust air. By keeping the engine room cooler, the engines get a cooler, condensed air with more oxygen leading to better economy and power. Another advantage is the compartments near the engine room are cooler.
Lepke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2019, 09:33 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
jimL's Avatar
 
City: New Baltimore, NY
Country: USA
Vessel Name: General's Quarters
Vessel Model: 2005 Mainship 430 Aft Cabin Trawler
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 177
When we bought the boat 4 yrs ago, the output duct had collapsed and there was no way I was going to climb back there to replace. I used a semi-flexible dryer vent accordion hose and used that to move the exhaust air to the port vents. After three years, I don't know if it makes a difference, but my ER gets to be over 100F in the summer and I figure the sooner I can get the twin Yanmars cooled, the better the AC will work. I have tried cruising with the blower on and it doesn't seem to make a difference with the ER temps. I'm thinking of mounting an oscillating fan from the ceiling and using that to circulate the air. Thinking that - I also realize that twin Yanmar 370 turbos are consuming tremendous amounts of air per minute and that alone should figure into the air requirements for combustion and cooling. Do you think Mainship engineered the air input/exit grates accordingly considering all of the above?

Jim
jimL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2019, 07:41 AM   #10
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 18,643
Funny that Mainship said run them when refueling...that goes against NASBLA boating safety course training.


Due to them pulling vapors into the bilge. Run them AFTER refueling if anything.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2019, 11:16 PM   #11
Veteran Member
 
Symphony's Avatar
 
City: New Haven, Ct
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Irma Jane
Vessel Model: Mainship 34 Pilot
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 94
I have had my 34 pilot for only one season. The blower is high exhaust. I tried it times, and I can put my hand out the helm window to feel the temperature of the air exhaust. I never felt much difference whether I ran fan or not. I figure the best use of it is to try to cool the engine room once you have stopped, but the fan is pretty noisy and doesnít work as fast as opening up the engine room and letting the heat out.
Symphony is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2019, 11:22 PM   #12
Guru
 
boatpoker's Avatar
 
City: Port Credit
Country: Ontario
Vessel Name: DIRT FREE
Vessel Model: Benford Fantail 38
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 2,387
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Funny that Mainship said run them when refueling...that goes against NASBLA boating safety course training.


Due to them pulling vapors into the bilge. Run them AFTER refueling if anything.
Blowers on a gas boat blow air (and vapours) out not in.
Whle blowing air out, passive intakes on the other side of the engine compartment draw fresh air in due to the vacuum created by the blower.
__________________
If you can live with the consequences, go for it - wg
Y'am what y'am an' thats' all that y'am - Popeye
I had an allergic reality - Jillie the Bean
boatpoker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2019, 07:12 AM   #13
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 2,916
When my 2008 AT was constructed, exhaust fans in the ER were not required.
I have told the USCG this and of course, they realize they are unnecessary.

I do have a fan that draws from the ER, to share the heat with the rest of the boat in the winter.
__________________
If you must love me, don't love me for my beauty. Love me because I know how to cook.
The burial for my intuitive gene was last month.
OldDan1943 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2019, 08:22 AM   #14
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 11,995
Greetings,
Mr. bp. "Blowers on a gas boat blow air (and vapours) out not in." Of course they do but I think Mr. ps's point is that whilst running, during refueling, they also CAN draw vapours in through the passive vents.
I would NEVER even consider running the blower on our gas boat during refueling. I refer you to page #38 of the Transport Canada Safe boating guide where it is recommended that during refueling, among other steps, the boat should be closed up (hatches, ports etc.). I suspect US recommendations are the same.

Running a blower during refueling could easily draw explosive vapours into the engine compartment due to wind conditions and the fact that the "passive" air intakes (which CANNOT be closed up) might not necessarily be "...on the other side of the engine compartment..."
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2019, 09:07 AM   #15
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 2,916
Quote:
Originally Posted by RT Firefly View Post
Greetings,
Mr. bp. "Blowers on a gas boat blow air (and vapours) out not in." Of course they do but I think Mr. ps's point is that whilst running, during refueling, they also CAN draw vapours in through the passive vents.
I would NEVER even consider running the blower on our gas boat during refueling. I refer you to page #38 of the Transport Canada Safe boating guide where it is recommended that during refueling, among other steps, the boat should be closed up (hatches, ports etc.). I suspect US recommendations are the same.

Running a blower during refueling could easily draw explosive vapours into the engine compartment due to wind conditions and the fact that the "passive" air intakes (which CANNOT be closed up) might not necessarily be "...on the other side of the engine compartment..."
With gasoline, as I recall, you want a dead boat. Everything electrical shut off. After feelings complete, run the fans for 15 (?) minutes and then, crawl down and sniff the bilges just to make sure there are no fumes.

Diesel boats, after refueling, sniff the bilges..... no biggie
__________________
If you must love me, don't love me for my beauty. Love me because I know how to cook.
The burial for my intuitive gene was last month.
OldDan1943 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2019, 09:32 AM   #16
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 11,995
Greetings,
Mr. OD. "...a dead boat." EXACTLY!!! I have had 2 occasions, in the last 30+ years, after re-fueling gas boats, where I needed to address the source of gas fumes. Readily dealt with and no-one was allowed onboard or even near while I rectified the situations.



I've been told and I agree with it that the "nose" is FAR superior to anything else in detecting gas fumes.


__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2019, 09:32 AM   #17
Guru
 
City: Carefree, Arizona
Country: usa
Vessel Name: sunchaser V
Vessel Model: DeFever 48
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 7,635
Our vessel has two ER blowers, one out and one in. Being a DeFever, the ER is good size allowing decent access for maintenance and checks right after a day's run. During these chores the blowers keep the ER crew comfortable. During cruising the blowers are off with the ER temperatures tolerable due to adequate passive ventilation, wet exhaust and smallish engines.

If we boated in warmer climes than the PNW, more blower capacity would likely be required.
sunchaser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2019, 10:35 AM   #18
Guru
 
Ski in NC's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Louisa
Vessel Model: Custom Built 38
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 4,899
On a hot summer day after running the main and then putting on the gennie, my ER gets HOT. Gennie end is air cooled and probably not too good for it to bake. So I run the exhaust blower then.

When main is running, it draws enough air to keep ER reasonably cool. No blower on then.

My exhaust blower draws air from top of ER near gennie and discharges through a nozzle in one of the ER vent plenums. This entrains air flow in the plenum and multiplies the air flow. Discharge on port plenum, supply on stbd.
Ski in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2019, 02:19 PM   #19
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 18,643
Thank you RTF..exctly the reasoning behind NASBLAs training suggestion....


Now whether there are credible arguments the other way.... I certainly could see some.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2019, 10:41 PM   #20
Guru
 
boatpoker's Avatar
 
City: Port Credit
Country: Ontario
Vessel Name: DIRT FREE
Vessel Model: Benford Fantail 38
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 2,387
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Thank you RTF..exctly the reasoning behind NASBLAs training suggestion....


Now whether there are credible arguments the other way.... I certainly could see some.
On a gasoline powered vessel, blower motors are required to be ignition protected. If the ventialtion system is set up as per ABYC (I know many don't like ABYC) the chance of drawing fumes back into the vessel are infinitismal.

That being said there are many mfg's that while they say they build to ABYC, clearly do not. Gasoline Ventilation on Boats.

In Canada a gasoline boat is required by law to run the blowers for 4 minutes prior to ignition.

I have no opinion just stating the ABYC and Transport Canada requirements
__________________

__________________
If you can live with the consequences, go for it - wg
Y'am what y'am an' thats' all that y'am - Popeye
I had an allergic reality - Jillie the Bean
boatpoker is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012