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Old 03-10-2013, 10:36 AM   #41
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I see it head for the "house" after shrimping doing 20 knots ON PLANE!!!!
Same in BC and Alaska, especially with the crabbers, with the Al hulls dominating on the newer builds. The sport and charter fishers with their planing hulls provide a wonderful ride in snotty conditions - plus with a weather savvy skipper can avoid the squalls and gales.
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Old 03-10-2013, 11:31 AM   #42
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I don't see Bayliners as true trawlers, but they certainly can be successfully operated like one. They don't have the weight, keel depth, rudder area, range, etc.

But... I can't get home at 16 knots either.

I think it's more a choice to operate in trawler style that makes a trawler at heart. I cruised with a friend of mine last summer and he did the whole week with us at 6-8 knots in a 4588 Bayliner Pilothouse. He was every bit as much a trawler as I was.
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Old 03-10-2013, 11:53 AM   #43
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I don't see Bayliners as true trawlers, but they certainly can be successfully operated like one. They don't have the weight, keel depth, rudder area, range, etc.
I agree with the above statement but, again, they're a lot of bang for the buck. They will, operated with caution, deliver a great on the water experience and as I've posted before, have a terrific layout for cruising.
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Old 03-14-2013, 03:42 PM   #44
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I had a Bayliner 3488 which I often ran like a trawler at about 8 kts. I was seriously looking at a 3988 when I began to notice the Mainship 350/390/400
models. Ended up with a single diesel 400 - a great boat. Not capable of the speeds I was used to, the 3488 could get over 20 kts WOT. But now I have more room, less engine maintenance cost having shed one engine, and the safety factor of diesel fuel. I'm not sure I could still be on the water with what has happened to the cost of fuel. My first tankful on the Mainship was at $1.80 gal. Now it's $3.99 a gallon. That's over a 100% rise in fuel cost in just over four years. If it doubles again in the next four years, I guess I will have to swallow the anchor. Just wanted to say that I like Bayliners - and Mainships! Maybe I just love boats; yeah, I think that's it.

Here is a rare snapshot from when I owned both boats (yeah I was too dumb to sell one before I bought the other). Spring 2009.
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Old 03-14-2013, 04:10 PM   #45
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I look at fuel this way. It's among the SMALLEST of expenditures of boating.
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Old 03-14-2013, 10:30 PM   #46
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If you are looking to liveaboard, even if only part time, I'd go for the 38 bayliner over the 34 Mainship. The 38 Bayliner has a great layout and spacious for her size and at least to me, decent classic lines for a sedan. The 34 Mainship is a nice boat but way more space on the 38. The hino diesels are great engines as well. We own a 45 bayliner right now and she gets remarkable fuel economy at hull speed and as mentioned previously a very good layout for her size. The same goes for the 38. The newer the boat the better and the larger she is the more comfortable she will be for you. either will cruise the same waters just fine if in good repair.
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Old 03-14-2013, 11:20 PM   #47
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I look at fuel this way. It's among the SMALLEST of expenditures of boating.
way too much is made about gph, mpg, etc.
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Old 03-14-2013, 11:43 PM   #48
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I cannot understand why the same people keep argueing about the same stuff on here ove and over and over.A TRUE TRAWLER IS A COMMERCIAL FISHING BOAT .What those of you on here are calling trawlers are jusr displacement hull pleasure boats no matter what size they are.Now move on.
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:48 AM   #49
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I cannot understand why the same people keep argueing about the same stuff on here ove and over and over.A TRUE TRAWLER IS A COMMERCIAL FISHING BOAT .What those of you on here are calling trawlers are jusr displacement hull pleasure boats no matter what size they are.Now move on.
Funny...those arguing the terminology on the "Trawler Forum"...seems like some have a hard time with sandbox rues....
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Old 03-15-2013, 11:39 AM   #50
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way too much is made about gph, mpg, etc.
Yep. No one complains about the cost of zincs... or the cheapest way to haul out... or the cheapest paint & varnish. I spend much more on these items each year.
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Old 03-15-2013, 01:45 PM   #51
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Yep....if the cost of fuel stings, then you cannot afford the boat. I was even going to make an (arguably) offensive statement and say....If the cost of fuel stings, then you likely will not properly maintain the boat.
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Old 03-15-2013, 02:10 PM   #52
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Yep. No one complains about the cost of zincs... or the cheapest way to haul out... or the cheapest paint & varnish. I spend much more on these items each year.
Perhaps you're not taking your boat out often/long enough.

I pay much more in property taxes (about $2500) as well as berthage (about $4000 a year) than fuel (about $1000) each year. (And then there is maintenance and the purchasing of "goodies" such as a dinghy.) Nevertheless, operating my boat efficiently is interesting even if fuel is a relatively small cost. Of course, that's because I've been operating the boat only about 125 hours a year.
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Old 03-15-2013, 04:57 PM   #53
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I dunno... they're pretty proud of my moorage ($745/mo) so I'm in nearly $10,000 a year just for the privilege of a hole in the water (electricity is extra).

I do try to operate as economically as possible, but it's such a small part of what boating is from an expense point of view... I tend not to worry about it much.
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Old 03-15-2013, 05:23 PM   #54
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I cannot understand why the same people keep argueing about the same stuff on here ove and over and over.A TRUE TRAWLER IS A COMMERCIAL FISHING BOAT .What those of you on here are calling trawlers are jusr displacement hull pleasure boats no matter what size they are.Now move on.
I'll see if I can help you to understand.

These boats (like mine) are adverised and sold as trawlers. They may not suit your personal definition of a trawler, but language changes over time and when I tell people I own a trawler, a boat similar to mine comes to their mind. Never once have I been asked if I am a commercial fisherman.

Perhaps you can answer this question for me:

Why do we have a Department of Motor Vehicles when everyone knows they are powered by engines, not motors?
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:02 PM   #55
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I love thread drift. Adds zest. Bayliner in answer to the OP. As to fuel, always remember that an inexpensive bottle of red wine costs about $10 per 750ml. Fuel is a bargain, though it still hurts in the moment when the numbers ($$$) are spinning on the pump. As to what is a trawler or not, ya'll are both correct, and like a former post referenced, it just as much about how you use your boat. I run my old boat at displacement speed, hence I crawl like a trawler. See ya on the water.
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:30 PM   #56
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Why do we have a Department of Motor Vehicles when everyone knows they are powered by engines, not motors?
Because this country is at heart part of England and they call them motors over there.
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:34 PM   #57
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I dunno... they're pretty proud of my moorage ($745/mo) so I'm in nearly $10,000 a year just for the privilege of a hole in the water (electricity is extra).
Me too! (About the same price) And my property taxes are through the roof!
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Old 03-15-2013, 07:29 PM   #58
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Because this country is at heart part of England and they call them motors over there.
An engine generates motion by burning fuel - gasoline engine, diesel engine, etc.

A motor produces motion using energy supplied to it by an outside source - electric motor, water motor, etc.
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Old 03-15-2013, 07:54 PM   #59
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An engine generates motion by burning fuel - gasoline engine, diesel engine, etc.

A motor produces motion using energy supplied to it by an outside source - electric motor, water motor, etc.
You'll have to take that up with the British. They not only call "engines" motors, they call the whole damn vehicle a "motor." Although that particular use of the word has dropped off considerably in recent years. But all the Brits and Scotts I know call the things that burn gasoline or diesel to power a vehicle a "motor."

Hence the term even we in the US use, "motorboat."
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Old 03-15-2013, 08:27 PM   #60
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Hello all,

We are old sailors who are looking at buying a trawler to live aboard in the warm south during our cold winter months. The budget isn't high, so we (think) we have narrowed it down to either a Mark 111 Mainship 34(1984) or a 1988 Bayliner 3870. Apart from the obvious difference in fuel consumption, what other comments do people have about the pros and cons of each of these boats?

We appreciate any and all input.
Cheers,
Alison
Bayliner - wider, longer, twins versus the single in the mainship.

Have you considered older motor yachts? These are extremely livable boats, more creature comfort spaces. Bertram, Hatteras, uniflight, pacemaker, Trojan are all good options for livability. What part of the country are you in? The Florida market is full of these kinds...
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