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Old 03-08-2013, 07:56 PM   #21
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FWIW:
I find it difficult to recognize any vessel that travels greater than 10.0 knots through the water as a trawler.
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Old 03-08-2013, 09:32 PM   #22
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I live on my 3870 Bayliner from mid-March to mid-December, gets a little cool in the winter to stay aboard. For a liveaboard there are certain things that make a boat more comfortable than one you only spend weekends or a few days on. 1st on my list is a berth that makes it easy to get a good nights sleep. 2nd is a decent size & well equipped galley. 3rd Good size tankage that allows several days between pump outs & having to fill the freshwater tank. 4th Plenty of storage, the 38 hits all these marks reasonable well. For the last 2 years my fuel burn has been 2.7 gph for over 225 hours, so the 304 gallons of capacity gives a pretty decent range. I also like the 45 & 47 but I don't want to wash or rent a slip for anything bigger than the 38. I have only been on a 430 Mainship & there is no comparison to a 38, so I really can't give a opinion on a 34. If I can answer any specific questions feel free to ask. Good luck
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Old 03-09-2013, 10:38 AM   #23
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River Cruiser,
Thanks very much for your post. You've hit the mark with your comments about the key requirements for living aboard - berth, galley, tankage. Have only been on the Mainship 34 and we are thinking it's probably too small. Glad to hear so many good things about the Bayliner!
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Old 03-09-2013, 10:52 AM   #24
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River Cruiser,
Thanks very much for your post. You've hit the mark with your comments about the key requirements for living aboard - berth, galley, tankage. Have only been on the Mainship 34 and we are thinking it's probably too small. Glad to hear so many good things about the Bayliner!
Recommend you register/log onto the Bayliner Owners Club and ask about the 38xx there- yes, the answers will be biased, but you'll get real data about the pros and cons of the 38.

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Old 03-09-2013, 11:05 AM   #25
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Also, the BOC is the most comprehensive manufacturer specific boating site on the web- there is an overwhelming amount of technical data, do-it-yourself project info, and help from owner (the "been there, done that" type of help).
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Old 03-09-2013, 11:14 AM   #26
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At the risk of starting another war you just did but from this size up they rival any other top line production boat.
No, they rival Carvers and Searays. But they certainly don't rival planing boats like Fleming, Riviera, Tiara, Ocean Alexander or Princess to name a few.

And they certainly don't rival the weight, sea keeping ability or range of the trawlers like Nordhavn, DeFever, Selene, Northwest or North Pacific.

Bayliners are and have been built to be planing boats and to a price point for mass consumption. That is OK and has proven quite acceptable in the market place. The fact that a capable skipper like Kevin can take a Bayliner to Alaska speaks for the skipper and not the boat.

A Taurus or Impala can drive down the highway just as far and carry as much as a BMW, Mercedes or Infiniti - but we all know what the difference is - the same applies to watercraft. Nor is a Cessna Cardinal a Beechcraft Bonanza.
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Old 03-09-2013, 11:17 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by El Sea View Post
FWIW:
I find it difficult to recognize any vessel that travels greater than 10.0 knots through the water as a trawler.
That's OK. The Bayliner isn't a trawler but here on this forum we have a number of trawlermen that don't own trawlers. But what's the difference? Not much except that normal cruisers don't have the range of trawlers, the weight of trawlers and the extra seaworthyness of trawlers. However some cruisers are more seaworthy than some trawlers. But most of us don't go that far or in heavy seas or wandering about in the ocean. So we're doing the same thing and experiencing almost entirely the same issues. When trawlers first started out they were called Heavy Cruisers. The word "heavy" should give one a hint as to the most defining difference between the trawlers and normal cruisers. Cruisers aren't all in one basket either as there's the 50 knot Sea Ray's and the 12 knot Bayliners and all their cousins.

But re your comment the only thing trawler about the Bayliner is the diesel engines.
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Old 03-09-2013, 11:36 AM   #28
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But re your comment the only thing trawler about the Bayliner is the diesel engines.
Your right Eric, but their engines are too big and propped for planing speeds
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Old 03-09-2013, 11:45 AM   #29
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I own a 40 Albin trawler....I'm neither wrong or right. Nor is anyone else.

If I ever list the boat for sale...I'll list it as a trawler so I get more responses from people who are interested in my type of vessel.

I won't worry about a handful of people out of a huge boating population that I have met that won't buy it because it is caled something they disagree with.

Plus many of the same probably wouldn't buy it because it doen't meet every ABYC standard...even though it meets more now than when I bought it....
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Old 03-09-2013, 11:59 AM   #30
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At the risk of starting another war, I agree with your comments about the Bayliner which also has far superior build quality. Any Bayliners below this size are low quality boats but from this size up they rival any other top line production boat.
It's be a war only if the elite element takes offense. No all can afford a Fleming, Nordhavn, or Defever- if a Bayliner, Carver, or whatever meets the needs of the owner, then it's the perfect boat for them.
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Old 03-09-2013, 12:37 PM   #31
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It's be a war only if the elite element takes offense.
Pau
You miss the statement boatpoker made which is - Bayliner quality RIVALS ANY OTHER TOP LINE PRODUCIION BOAT

This is simply not the case. Elite element you say, hardly. I have owned many Bayliner quality boats, know them well and appreciate them for what they are. This is not about you, me or Bayliner owners, it is about the above statement a boat surveyor (no, not Pascoe) made
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Old 03-09-2013, 01:01 PM   #32
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Getting back to the OP's question, there is a little confusion here. Mainship made two different series of 34 trawlers (they are semi-planing but were built and advertized as trawlers that run 8 kts and burn 2 gph.) the first ones were the MS I II and III built in the late 70's and early 80's had an 11' beam (+-) and a 34' loa. This is the boat the original poster was comparing to the Bayliner. In space and size the Bayliner wins hands down as it has a 13' plus beam and a 38 lwl. It is a much larger boat and as I said earlier it is a really good looking boat. The recent Mainship 34 T is much larger than the original 34 I II or III with a 14' 2" beam and a loa of about 36' and I feel would be a better livaboard than the Bayliner. They did not start making these until the mid 2000's and they are a lot more money than the Bayliner.

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Old 03-09-2013, 01:03 PM   #33
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Call it what you will, but get the boat that fits your needs and wants. Now when I bought my trawler . . . . . . .
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Old 03-09-2013, 03:03 PM   #34
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The fact that a capable skipper like Kevin can take a Bayliner to Alaska speaks for the skipper and not the boat.
In my opinion this is the only statement that's relevant across the board here. To me a trawler is and always will be a boat that fishes using trawl gear: nets, spreaders, otter doors, etc.. Period.

I know all the marketing hype reasons why everything from a Grand Banks to a Sea Ray gets called a "trawler" and I don't buy into any of it. The production boats almost everyone on this forum have are simply cabin cruisers as far as I'm concerned. If Eric wants to call them "heavy cruisers" that's a fair description to.

Tom's statement applies to every type of boat on this forum. GBs and Great Harbors have gone to or from Hawaii on their own bottoms. They were stunts in each case,but they made it. Nordhavns have gone around the world without fanfare. The same model Nordhavns have spent most of their days sitting at a dock or putzing around local waters from marina to marina. We have met people with a 34' Bayliner who have made multiple five-month trips up the Inside Passage to SE Alaska and back. This in a boat some people feel is barely qualified to cross Puget Sound on a nice day.

So what's the determining factor in defining the capabilities of a boat? Sure, the design, construction, and quality will make a boat better suited for some uses than others. But rigidly limiting it? No. The operator is the defining factor.

Saying a Bayliner is of equal quality to a Fleming or a Nordhavn or a GB or an Eastbay is simply not true regardless of how much the Bayliner fan wishes or believes it is.

But saying a Bayliner or Sea Ray or high-rise Carver sundeck monstrosity is flat out not capable of doing this, that or the other thing is also not true. What it can or can't do is dependent almost entirely on the skill, judgement, and experience of the operator.

In that respect, a Bayliner or Mainship or GB or your-boat-here can do anything you are capable of making it do. It can give you a great voyage and it can also get you killed. But I firmly believe the outcome is in our hands, not the boat's.

Bottom line is that I believe a Bayliner is every bit as viable a purchase choice as a Grand Banks or a Nordhavn or a Mainship. The only thing that counts is what the boater wants to do and is capable of doing or learning to do.
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Old 03-09-2013, 03:46 PM   #35
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The word Trawler describes a concept, the name of our full displacement round bilge "trawlers" is cutter.
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Old 03-09-2013, 04:09 PM   #36
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Here a drawing of an old fish cutter design, see my boat.
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Old 03-09-2013, 09:34 PM   #37
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The word Trawler describes a concept, the name of our full displacement round bilge "trawlers" is cutter.
Not in America...sort using "trawler" on any boat for sale site and see what comes up most frequently.
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Old 03-09-2013, 10:43 PM   #38
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In my opinion this is the only statement that's relevant across the board here. To me a trawler is and always will be a boat that fishes using trawl gear: nets, spreaders, otter doors, etc.. Period.

I know all the marketing hype reasons why everything from a Grand Banks to a Sea Ray gets called a "trawler" and I don't buy into any of it. The production boats almost everyone on this forum have are simply cabin cruisers as far as I'm concerned. If Eric wants to call them "heavy cruisers" that's a fair description to.

Tom's statement applies to every type of boat on this forum. GBs and Great Harbors have gone to or from Hawaii on their own bottoms. They were stunts in each case,but they made it. Nordhavns have gone around the world without fanfare. The same model Nordhavns have spent most of their days sitting at a dock or putzing around local waters from marina to marina. We have met people with a 34' Bayliner who have made multiple five-month trips up the Inside Passage to SE Alaska and back. This in a boat some people feel is barely qualified to cross Puget Sound on a nice day.

So what's the determining factor in defining the capabilities of a boat? Sure, the design, construction, and quality will make a boat better suited for some uses than others. But rigidly limiting it? No. The operator is the defining factor.

Saying a Bayliner is of equal quality to a Fleming or a Nordhavn or a GB or an Eastbay is simply not true regardless of how much the Bayliner fan wishes or believes it is.

But saying a Bayliner or Sea Ray or high-rise Carver sundeck monstrosity is flat out not capable of doing this, that or the other thing is also not true. What it can or can't do is dependent almost entirely on the skill, judgement, and experience of the operator.

In that respect, a Bayliner or Mainship or GB or your-boat-here can do anything you are capable of making it do. It can give you a great voyage and it can also get you killed. But I firmly believe the outcome is in our hands, not the boat's.

Bottom line is that I believe a Bayliner is every bit as viable a purchase choice as a Grand Banks or a Nordhavn or a Mainship. The only thing that counts is what the boater wants to do and is capable of doing or learning to do.
Excellent post!

A Bayliner is a production boat. They, were purchased by dealers and sat at the dealers dock untill sold.

They are not, and never will be a custom boat. They do not and never will have the "fanciness" or the fit and finish of a Grand Banks level boat.

What people seem to fail to realize sometimes is that just because a Bayliner or a Mainship is not as fancy, or have as detailed jointery that they are not less seaworthy. They are just less fancy.

A Bayliner or a Mainship is just as seaworthy as any other boat having a similar hull form. They are coastal cruisers, plain and simple. To compare them to a passagemaker for example, any passagemaker would not be fair to either boat.
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Old 03-10-2013, 09:54 AM   #39
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There is a shrimp boat(looks just like any other shrimp boat) here in Galveston Bay that uses "trawl gear" to catch it's shrimp...and it is quite a sight and literally baffles my mind every time I see it head for the "house" after shrimping doing 20 knots ON PLANE!!!!

BUT................
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Old 03-10-2013, 10:31 AM   #40
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I'll just pile on and agree with Marin and Kevin. Spot on.

If you poke around the web enough you'll find a blog or account by a couple who took a Bayliner 32 (maybe 34?) up and down the entire Pacific Coast, then down through Mexico, and through the canal ad up to Rio Dulce last I heard. They were well prepared and had a blast.
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