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Old 09-20-2018, 01:44 PM   #1
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Weight/tonnage

My survey report said my boat is 13000 lbs. it's a 1986 Oceania 35 with a single Perkins 135. It was never an issue until my Maxwell/Nilsson windlass gave up the ghost. The Lewmar people said that their Pro Series 1000 would do it if it was a light displacement 35, I would need the H2 if it was a heavy displacement. The H2 is double the cost. I think the actual weight should be around 20,000 lbs. . Anyone have a better idea. What about windlass recommendations?
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Old 09-20-2018, 02:14 PM   #2
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My survey report said my boat is 13000 lbs. it's a 1986 Oceania 35 with a single Perkins 135. It was never an issue until my Maxwell/Nilsson windlass gave up the ghost. The Lewmar people said that their Pro Series 1000 would do it if it was a light displacement 35, I would need the H2 if it was a heavy displacement. The H2 is double the cost. I think the actual weight should be around 20,000 lbs. . Anyone have a better idea. What about windlass recommendations?

I'd recommend you stick with the lifting capacity that is currently on vessel. Have you shopped around? What is the current model, anchor size and rode type?
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Old 09-20-2018, 06:10 PM   #3
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abandon hope all ye who enter here........
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Old 09-20-2018, 07:41 PM   #4
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How much does your ground tackle weigh?
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Old 09-20-2018, 08:01 PM   #5
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How much does your ground tackle weigh?
Exactly...youíre lifting the ground tackle, not the boat. What depth do you anchor in? 100 ft of chain plus the anchor hanging straight down is a lot of weight; 12 ft, not so much.
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Old 09-21-2018, 07:44 AM   #6
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I have a CT 35 sundeck and a displacement of 13k for your boat sure seems way low. My brochure indicated 19.8k empty, add water/fuel and Iím at 24k.
Anyway as noted by others boat displacement does not really matter, itís the ground tackle that counts.
I installed a Lewmar Pro1000 for my boat as Iím using a 35# Delta and 50í of G4 5/16 chain. Pro1000 has no problem with that set up.
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Old 09-21-2018, 07:55 AM   #7
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Greetings,
Re: Post #3. Agreed...


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Old 09-21-2018, 11:11 AM   #8
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Tonnage has nothing to do with the weight of your boat. It is a measure of how much wine a vessel can carry.

The word "tun" was originally a size of a cask used to ship wine from
Spain & Portugal to England. In 1347 a tax of 3 shillings per tun was
imposed and this was called "tonnage." A ship's size became known by the
number of casks it could carry, and the word tonnage started being used
to describe a ship's size.

It was found that if you took the length x the breadth x the depth of
the hold under the deck and divided by 100 it was close to the number of
casks. That is where we get the "Measurement ton" of 100 cubic feet per
ton.


There are several kinds of tonnage: The first two are used by the tax
collector. The next two are used by designers. The fifth and sixth are
used by freight salesmen and canal operators and the last one is used by
the USCG for documenting boats.


(There's more if you're interested...)



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Old 09-21-2018, 11:20 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeadMistress View Post
Tonnage has nothing to do with the weight of your boat. It is a measure of how much wine a vessel can carry.

The word "tun" was originally a size of a cask used to ship wine from
Spain & Portugal to England. In 1347 a tax of 3 shillings per tun was
imposed and this was called "tonnage." A ship's size became known by the
number of casks it could carry, and the word tonnage started being used
to describe a ship's size.

It was found that if you took the length x the breadth x the depth of
the hold under the deck and divided by 100 it was close to the number of
casks. That is where we get the "Measurement ton" of 100 cubic feet per
ton.


There are several kinds of tonnage: The first two are used by the tax
collector. The next two are used by designers. The fifth and sixth are
used by freight salesmen and canal operators and the last one is used by
the USCG for documenting boats.


(There's more if you're interested...)



--Peggie
Mr RTF can testimony that my boat has a very very high tonnage lol

L.
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Old 09-22-2018, 04:55 AM   #10
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Weight/tonnage

Very interesting replies. So, if you are not supposed to haul your boat up to the anchor with your windlass and you are supposed to snub your rode when anchored, then your tonnage should only influence rode size and grade, right? My ground tackle is a 20 kg. Bruce claw and 150 ft. Of 5/16 BBB chain. I rarely anchor in depths beyond 20 ft unless there is any emergency. For 20 ft. I lay out about 60 to 70 feet of chain.
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Old 09-22-2018, 06:13 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oceania View Post
Very interesting replies. So, if you are not supposed to haul your boat up to the anchor with your windlass and you are supposed to snub your rode when anchored, then your tonnage should only influence rode size and grade, right:
Not necessarily. In an imperfect anchorage the wind blows and current runs. Sometimes hard, like a gale (or worse) when you are anchored and readying for retrieval. Under these potential real world scenarios, keeping the boat pointed and powering perfectly into the wind and current with no environmental load on the windlass is nigh impossible for the Admiral with me on the foredeck.

The total load the windlass then sees may well be above the weight of the anchor, rode and "break loose" from the bottom forces. How much more load you size you windlass for is called safety factor and is up to you and your wallet. I like windlass sizing to minimally approximate 75% of the WLL of your well sized chain. Imperfect - of course. Debatable - absolutely. Safe - yes.
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Old 09-22-2018, 06:35 AM   #12
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Not necessarily. In an imperfect anchorage the wind blows and current runs. Sometimes hard, like a gale (or worse) when you are anchored and readying for retrieval. Under these potential real world scenarios, keeping the boat pointed and powering perfectly into the wind and current with no environmental load on the windlass is nigh impossible for the Admiral with me on the foredeck.

The total load the windlass then sees may well be above the weight of the anchor, rode and "break loose" from the bottom forces. How much more load you size you windlass for is called safety factor and is up to you and your wallet. I like windlass sizing to minimally approximate 75% of the WLL of your well sized chain. Imperfect - of course. Debatable - absolutely. Safe - yes.


Those that keep posting how fragile windlasses are need to do 2 things....I am guessing buy better ones ( if still made), and take one apart that has been abused (like mine) and see how little damage there is to the working parts.

Heck mine is almost pulling through the solid teak pulpit and shows little sign of chipped or broken or even worn gears (one key is a lityle loose) and it is a 1988 that has only had a break in anchoring for about 4 years.

I am not advocating abuse, but as pointed out, sometimes pulling anchor is less than idyllic.
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Old 09-22-2018, 06:48 AM   #13
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Greetings,
Re: Post #9...


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Old 09-22-2018, 08:51 AM   #14
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then your tonnage should only influence rode size and grade, right?


Tonnage has nothing to do with it..it's your boat's WEIGHT that determines anchor rode size and grade. See post #8


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Old 09-23-2018, 09:31 AM   #15
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Thanks Peggie, but I guess you want me to distinguish weight from the term tonnage vis your explanation. I got it!
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Old 09-27-2018, 06:57 AM   #16
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I've ordered a Lewmar Pro Series 1000 with a 5/16" gypsy for a BBB chain . That should do it.
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Old 10-01-2018, 01:04 PM   #17
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Windlass Issue

I had a similar boat and windlass as you and did not have any problems.. I always motored up to the anchor while the windlass.was taking up the rope/chain with out a load. . The windlass is designed to lift the anchor when the bow is on top of it. I've seen boaters let the windlass pull the boat up to the amchor which it is not designed to do.
I would guess your dry weight is about 9 tons.
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Old 10-01-2018, 03:14 PM   #18
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Every windlass instruction sheet I have ever read said not to use the windlass to pull the boat to the anchor. They recommend you power up on the anchor and use the engine to power it out of the bottom. If you have not been doing this, then perhaps this is why you need a new windlass.
Therefore, the weight of your boat should have less to do with the size of your windlass than the weight of your ground tackle, as those above have said. However, I think one should have enough power in your windlass to power up the entire amount of chain and your heaviest anchor, should it ever be necessary, if for instance, if your anchor were to go down unintentionally, in deep water while you are underway. It happens!
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Old 10-01-2018, 04:07 PM   #19
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No serious cruiser ever complains about too much windlass or too much anchor.

We have never had an issue with ours even in extreme conditions but I would increase everything in size in a heartbeat if I was looking at replacing everything.

Add: we mostly pull/pulse our 65 tonnes up to the anchor with the windlass as it keeps us heading to the anchor and not overshooting it.
Never had the overload breakers trip yet and cones/clutch are set to slip before overload.
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Old 10-01-2018, 05:07 PM   #20
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No serious cruiser ever complains about too much windlass or too much anchor.

We have never had an issue with ours even in extreme conditions but I would increase everything in size in a heartbeat if I was looking at replacing everything.

Add: we mostly pull/pulse our 65 tonnes up to the anchor with the windlass as it keeps us heading to the anchor and not overshooting it.
Never had the overload breakers trip yet and cones/clutch are set to slip before overload.
Agreed...I don't expect my windlass to pull me forward in a gale and huge chop...but in most anchoring conditions it does it fine.... with the pull a bit and let the catenary do most of the work, then pull some more.

I have had my windlass apart several times, it is a 1988 Vetus and the gears look in great shape.

I feel sorry for those that have to baby their windlass as it just makes life that little bit harder.
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