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-   -   amount of line to have (http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s42/amount-line-have-9851.html)

Wxx3 04-22-2013 11:16 AM

amount of line to have
 
Hi all,

Saw an ad at west Marine taday for 250 ft of line with splice.

In thinking of my line inventory on boat, while i have a few nice 50' braided lines, I don't have one really long one. So, thought I'd ask your thoughts.

My initial thought was I would a some point certainly need one. maybe two?? none???

Thanks for letign me pick your brains.
Richard

Pineapple Girl 04-22-2013 11:36 AM

We have two long (150 or 200, I forget) lines. Mostly because one place we like to moor, we need them. However it has been handy to have one many, many other times. I would jump on it!

alormaria 04-22-2013 11:39 AM

Go for it! You can't be too rich or too thin or have too much line.

GFC 04-22-2013 12:54 PM

I have a 250' line on a hose reel that stores in the lazarette. I haven't used it yet but it's ready to go if I need it.

Marin 04-22-2013 01:11 PM

The only long line we carry on the boat is our stern-tie line, IIRC it is 600' of 1/2" poly on a portable garden hose reel. This is a necessary thing to have available on boats up here because many of the smaller anchorages require running a stern line to shore and back to prevent the boat from swinging into adjacent boats or into the shoreline, rocks, etc.

The only time we put it on the boat is when we are going to be going to places we think or know we'll need it. Otherwise we keep it at home.

Outside of this line and the boat's running rigging the longest lines we have on the boat are our four spring lines which are 30 feet long.

Codger2 04-22-2013 01:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by alormaria (Post 151345)
Go for it! You can't be too rich or too thin or have too much line.

I agree about the too rich part but I don't like skinny (whew! I'm safe there!) and I only carry about 150 ft. of line in a bucket.:blush:

CPseudonym 04-22-2013 01:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wxx3 (Post 151339)
My initial thought was I would a some point certainly need one. maybe two?? none???

Thanks for letign me pick your brains.
Richard

I'll say this much Richard, if your luck runs anything like mine you'll wish you had bought it the next time your on the boat.:facepalm:

Wxx3 04-22-2013 02:14 PM

Thanks all.
I'll get at least one now and watch out for a deal on more.

Richard

AKDoug 04-22-2013 02:26 PM

When I bought my Bayliner in Seattle in 1985, they locals were amazed that I had 600' of 1/2" line laid out on the dock measuring it to cut into two lines. They said they usually anchor in less than 30' of water. I use a 400' main line and have another 200' for a stern line. It is common in the Sound or the Fiords to be in over 150' of water and still within 200' of shore. You anchor to keep from hitting the beach, and tie to the beach to keep from blowing out to sea, even in bays. The tidal flow and a 20' range is it's own story.

AKDoug 04-22-2013 02:27 PM

Scope ceases to exist in that kind of an anchoring situation :-)

Marin 04-22-2013 02:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AKDoug (Post 151410)
When I bought my Bayliner in Seattle in 1985, they locals were amazed that I had 600' of 1/2" line laid out on the dock measuring it to cut into two lines. They said they usually anchor in less than 30' of water.

We've found that in the upper Puget Sound/San Juan islands and in the Gulf Islands on up through Desolation Sound it is generally possible to anchor in fairly reasonable depths. We aim for 30-40 feet and so far have always been able to find this depth with plenty of swinging room.

But as one goes farther north the underwater geography becomes much more severe with hills or mountains dropping right down into the water where they simply keep going. So a narrow shelf right along shore is often all there is as Doug describes. So stern ties and deep-water anchor sets become more and more common.

But in the area we have boated with the GB thus far, the 200' of all chain rode we carry has been sufficient, although there have been numerous times when we've used just about all of it.

Our stern anchor is sized to be the main anchor of the boat as is its combination rode. The rode is carried in a heavy-duty milk crate kept on the aft deck so if we need to we could carry it forward and shackle it onto the end of our main rode to get another few hundred feet out if necessary. But so far we have not had to do this.

If at the time we had known what we know now, we would have replaced the rusted, short, all-chain rode that came with the boat with 250' of all-chain instead of just 200.'

When and if the time comes we are able to take the GB on longer cruises farther north we will replace our current 200' all-chain rode with a 300' all-chain rode.

BruceK 04-22-2013 08:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by alormaria (Post 151345)
Go for it! You can't be too rich or too thin or have too much line.

Or have too many torches onboard.

Marin 04-22-2013 08:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BruceK (Post 151499)
Or have too many torches onboard.

Oy! Are you going to start going on about loud hailers and panel beaters next?

Northern Spy 04-22-2013 08:59 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by BruceK (Post 151499)
Or have too many torches onboard.

yup.

Arch 04-22-2013 09:38 PM

I recently purchased a Marine Trader 36. I am gearing up for the Great Loop (starting in May) so my needs are different than those of you with regular cruising grounds. That said here is what I will be carrying:

200 feet of 5/16 ht chain on main anchor,
200 feet of chain and rope rode for second anchor,
8 30 foot (more or less) 5/8 dock lines

On order:
600 feet of 1/2 inch double braid ($355)
300 feet of 3/8 inch 3/8 double braid ($113),(as backup for outboard motor crane, etc.)

I think at the end of the day your needs are dependent on where you cruise and how you use your boat. In a blow, at two AM, with a dragging anchor, that extra line may be the very best investment you ever made.

Arch


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