Trawler Forum

Trawler Forum (http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/)
-   Welcome Mat (http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s53/)
-   -   Southeast Alaska newbie (http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s53/southeast-alaska-newbie-8929.html)

Paulie485 02-16-2013 02:50 AM

Southeast Alaska newbie
 
Greetings,

Lifelong boater here, currently sans bateau, but thinking about jumping back in. Looking to introduce our 6 year old son to the beaches and forests of Southeast Ak. in a reasonably sized and economical trawler. Started with the idea of a Nordic tug 32, but quickly realized there are a LOT of good choices out there. I'll hang out for a while to soak up some of the collective wisdom here in the forum. I'm starting a list of candidates. Criteria in no particular order:

<$150k
32-42 ft.
Stingy with fuel
Semi-displacement (???)
The simpler the better-no complicated systems
Good heat and galley
Ideally two cabins, but that's negotiable
Minimal to no brightwork
Useful aft working deck
Preferably lying Pacific Northwest

Any thoughts or leads welcome. One specific question: who are the brokers of reference for trawlers in this part of the world?

Thanks,

Paul

ksanders 02-16-2013 08:29 AM

Hello Paul

Alaska Boat Brokers is based out of Juneau.

As far as trawlers there is a roughwater 36 for sale in Whittier that has been recently repowered with a new perkins engine.

I saw the ad on Craigslist a couple weeks ago.

I don't know anything about the boat except from looking at it while walking the dock over the years. I thought it looked pretty nice.

swampu 02-16-2013 09:02 AM

Paul, skipperdude lives up that way. maybe he could help you spot some deals and help you with the narrowing down options.
Another Paul

sunchaser 02-16-2013 09:11 AM

Seattle area listings are the place to look, lots of choices that would fit your needs. There are about 6-10 good brokers to peruse.

sunchaser 02-16-2013 09:27 AM

Check out YW#1436-2435840 for a well equipped Navigator for $169K located in Seattle at Lake Union.

Codger2 02-16-2013 09:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Paulie485 (Post 135042)
Looking to introduce our 6 year old son to the beaches and forests of Southeast Ak...... Started with the idea of a Nordic tug 32,.......

Ideally two cabins, but that's negotiable (Probably not on the Nordic tug 32)
Useful aft working deck (Small cockpit, 32)

All the other items on your list can be achieved in the NT 32.

I love the Nordic Tugs and think they are great boats for SE Alaska. They certainly meet your criteria, except for the red items above. We have a gentleman (Manyboats) on this forum who has a lot of experience in cruising the area you've defined. Hopefully, he'll chime in with an opinion.

As was previously mentioned, there are a lot of boats that will fit your criteria and budget.

MurrayM 02-16-2013 11:35 AM

Hi, from north coast BC :)

This is a fun site to pop into once in a while;

Pacific Boat Brokers Inc.

Nomad Willy 02-16-2013 11:59 AM

Thanks Walt and especially for the gentleman part.

I've been very busy w guests these last few days and kinda waiting to see where Paul hails from. Paul I have spent about 1/3 of my long life in Alaska and have been further connected by my father and the Alaska Magazine.

My last (may be correct) stint in Ak was 7 years at Thorne Bay. Your Alaska boat is best different from others from further so in these ways.
1. Dependable from the standpoint of it's mechanical and seaworthyness abilities. You're better off out there w an OB than a big heavy duty boat w/o power. And a good handling boat w a big rudder is golden. Lots of boats w a flattish bottom can be more seaworthy than a round bilge boat. My dad went down Chatham Strait w his very light plywood Sabre Craft to Angoon and pounded most of the windows out bucking seas but he made it to Angoon safely.
2. A layout suited to your needs. I fished only from skiffs and got by w not much afterdeck. Any afterdeck gain in space is a loss in the size of a warm dry salon.
3. Two or three sources of heat. Ideally I'd go w a Wabasto/e-spar type heater, a bus heater and a diesel stove all in good working order.
4. Good fwd visibility. Lots of logs and stuff to run into.
5. Engine and other mechanical systems to have local service and parts.
6. Good ground tackle including an anchor w good short scope ability. Claws and Danforths work quite well in SE. There are others too but since you'll be anchoring deep often you'll like a very dependable windlass or a rode light enough to hand pull. Most anchors work well enough but bigger is better as the thread (by that name) will attempt to show.
7. A boat that demands a minimum of maintenance especially due to cold/wet weather. Aluminum is of course excellent but very expensive. FG is good but hard to repair in SE weather. But wood is even doable if you learn much from fishermen. Remember that the only time you'll have to work on the outside of your boat is usually only a small window of summer time that you also will want to be out fishing or cruising.
8. Perhaps range depending on your needs.
9. Speed can be a benefit in late fall or winter while cruising because of the very limited daylight. Almost never will speed get you out of bad weather conditions.

The most important factor is you Paul. Perhaps you knew most or all of the above. And underway there's not much more important than the skipper, his knowledge and experience.

So ... where do you live Paul?

Great link MurrayM,
Pick some boats Paul and ask for some comments.

Paulie485 02-22-2013 05:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by manyboats (Post 135136)
Thanks Walt and especially for the gentleman part.

I've been very busy w guests these last few days and kinda waiting to see where Paul hails from. Paul I have spent about 1/3 of my long life in Alaska and have been further connected by my father and the Alaska Magazine.

My last (may be correct) stint in Ak was 7 years at Thorne Bay. Your Alaska boat is best different from others from further so in these ways.
1. Dependable from the standpoint of it's mechanical and seaworthyness abilities. You're better off out there w an OB than a big heavy duty boat w/o power. And a good handling boat w a big rudder is golden. Lots of boats w a flattish bottom can be more seaworthy than a round bilge boat. My dad went down Chatham Strait w his very light plywood Sabre Craft to Angoon and pounded most of the windows out bucking seas but he made it to Angoon safely.
2. A layout suited to your needs. I fished only from skiffs and got by w not much afterdeck. Any afterdeck gain in space is a loss in the size of a warm dry salon.
3. Two or three sources of heat. Ideally I'd go w a Wabasto/e-spar type heater, a bus heater and a diesel stove all in good working order.
4. Good fwd visibility. Lots of logs and stuff to run into.
5. Engine and other mechanical systems to have local service and parts.
6. Good ground tackle including an anchor w good short scope ability. Claws and Danforths work quite well in SE. There are others too but since you'll be anchoring deep often you'll like a very dependable windlass or a rode light enough to hand pull. Most anchors work well enough but bigger is better as the thread (by that name) will attempt to show.
7. A boat that demands a minimum of maintenance especially due to cold/wet weather. Aluminum is of course excellent but very expensive. FG is good but hard to repair in SE weather. But wood is even doable if you learn much from fishermen. Remember that the only time you'll have to work on the outside of your boat is usually only a small window of summer time that you also will want to be out fishing or cruising.
8. Perhaps range depending on your needs.
9. Speed can be a benefit in late fall or winter while cruising because of the very limited daylight. Almost never will speed get you out of bad weather conditions.

The most important factor is you Paul. Perhaps you knew most or all of the above. And underway there's not much more important than the skipper, his knowledge and experience.

So ... where do you live Paul?

Great link MurrayM,
Pick some boats Paul and ask for some comments.

Thanks for the great tips. I actually live in Juneau and have been boating around here since - - good lord, has it really been 30 years? Much of that was in a sailboat, which is realistically, because of the fickle winds, a six knot motor boat with no view and a wet a$@. Then there was a stint working a 50' steel harbor tug. She was drawn by Ed Monk and was a wonderful performing vessel. I worship at the church of Monk. Which brings me to to two boats that I have my eye on: a Little Hoquiam trawler and a Sunnfjord. Both full displacement Monk hulls and built like tanks. Both need some love. The main difference is that one has a single Chrysler Nissan. Out of business, no parts. The other has twin Perkins 6.354's, of which they made over a million, and Perkins is still in business. That may decide it right there. Any thoughts or advice from the forum?

Codger2 02-22-2013 07:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Paulie485 (Post 136275)
The other has twin Perkins 6.354's, :thumb: of which they made over a million, and Perkins is still in business. That may decide it right there.

It would for me.....:popcorn:

Nomad Willy 02-22-2013 11:24 AM

The "That may decide it right there." factor is a biggie and I've walked away from boats that had that problem most notably a 32 Nordic Tug w a dated Yanmar engine that the distributor in Seattle hardly knew of it's existence.

But if they had offered me the boat for $25000 less than normal value it would be a better buy suddenly instead of something to walk away from. Then I could shop around and put one of my favorite engines in the boat set up the way I like it. That's what I did w my Willard and it worked our well. But that's only if your'e up to a re-power. Also most sellers will assume (probably correctly) that someone will come along and buy the boat w/o checking on the engine's serviceability.

I was born in Juneau and worked at Skinner's Hardware and on the ferries as a waiter in the 70s.

Are the Monk boats old woodies and do you have pics?

Alaskan Sea-Duction 02-22-2013 11:35 AM

Welcome Paul!

Paulie485 02-23-2013 01:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by manyboats (Post 136358)
The "That may decide it right there." factor is a biggie and I've walked away from boats that had that problem most notably a 32 Nordic Tug w a dated Yanmar engine that the distributor in Seattle hardly knew of it's existence.

But if they had offered me the boat for $25000 less than normal value it would be a better buy suddenly instead of something to walk away from. Then I could shop around and put one of my favorite engines in the boat set up the way I like it. That's what I did w my Willard and it worked our well. But that's only if your'e up to a re-power. Also most sellers will assume (probably correctly) that someone will come along and buy the boat w/o checking on the engine's serviceability.

I was born in Juneau and worked at Skinner's Hardware and on the ferries as a waiter in the 70s.

Are the Monk boats old woodies and do you have pics?

No, they are mid-70's fiberglass commercial fishing hulls with extended trawler-style houses. No pictures on this computer, but you can find them both on YW. As a friend of mine said, "they were built for some tough customers".

tpbrady 02-28-2013 08:05 PM

Paul,

"a six knot motor boat with no view and a wet a$@"

I'll pass this along to my neighbors in Anchorage. I believe they can only make 5 in their Beneteau.

We might see you this summer as we bring our 38 foot trawler up from La Conner. My wife and I recently looked at quite a few boats in the Seattle area and can maybe offer our insight into the market.

Tom

Rebel112r 02-28-2013 09:13 PM

Went to high school in Juneau, lived in 20th Century Apts, 65-68. Been to Skinners many times. Always remember the ice tray for displaying big fish sitting outside. Now in Birch Bay, wa. Commander 30 boat now driving. Retirement is good

Paulie485 03-02-2013 12:43 AM

News: going to survey next week on a classy boat in Vancouver. More details when the deal is done.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:36 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012