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-   -   what to look for in a trawler? (http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s30/what-look-trawler-7563.html)

gopro 10-21-2012 08:57 PM

what to look for in a trawler?
 
we have been into sailing for 10 years and now want to experience the trawler ICW world. We would love a 32-35 in to separate living areas. We would like to be able to take it to the Bahamas from s. florida... I like to where you can steer from the outside and inside. You can probably tell that I do know nothing about trawlers. Hope to learn. We just sold our csy 44 sailboat. gopro into the trawler world

El Sea 10-21-2012 09:21 PM

Welcome to the other side ...

I would recommend you make a 'grocery list' of what you would like in a trawler then charter a few. After this then make a list of items you 'really' don't want.

galley up or galley down
teak decks, no teak
fly bridge, no fly bridge
twins, or single

The list is endless....


"it's the voyage, not the vessel"

FF 10-22-2012 08:04 AM

Trawler is a style of deck house , the hull and drive train may be almost identical to any displacement motor yacht.

When you look at boats look at ALL the displacement boats , not just those marketed to be "trawlers".

For slow speed and where fuel is common like the AICW or Bahamas a gas powered boat may have a lower total cost.

As you are used to a 6K or 7K cruise you will enjoy the displacement life style , abnd being ON the water , not IN the water as a sail hull does.

markpierce 11-07-2012 11:26 PM

Was this what you had in mind?

http://www.trawlerforum.com/attachme...1766a037e3.jpg

What I had in mind was a single-engined diesel, hull-speed (non-planing) capable, with a keel-protected propeller and rudder, 360-degree level deck and 360-degree visibility from pilothouse, strong waist-high railings, sleeping two and entertaining six, and high-capacity tankage (fuel, water, sewage).

http://www.trawlerforum.com/attachme...a968f23f00.jpg

Others place priorities with two engines, genset, flybridge, and multiple staterooms.

Pays your money and takes your choice.

Earl34Mainship 11-08-2012 05:53 AM

gopro... I'm biased... I spent a year researching trawlers and settled on the Mainship for many of the same reasons/criteria you mentioned. I made a list of "necessary" items (too many to list here) and compiled the data. Mainship offers a 34 with single stateroom - the newer 34's have 2 staterooms, and their 39 has 2 staterooms. Mechanical equipment (engine, xmission, gen, electronics, steering, etc) are all open market items, and service information is easily accessed from the web. Flybridge is enclosed with isenglass (360 view) and high enough for great visibility. Single Yanmar is easy on diesel at cruising speed - 7-9 mph. Others have their preferred trawler, but the Mainship is worth considering.

Hendo78 11-08-2012 08:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gopro (Post 109059)
we have been into sailing for 10 years and now want to experience the trawler ICW world. We would love a 32-35 in to separate living areas. We would like to be able to take it to the Bahamas from s. florida... I like to where you can steer from the outside and inside. You can probably tell that I do know nothing about trawlers. Hope to learn. We just sold our csy 44 sailboat. gopro into the trawler world

You handy at building? If so, build one or do what I am doing and get an old girl and bring her back to life. There will be the naysayers and the critics and the old chestnut argument of "its more expensive" but at the end of the day "You" did it and set it up how "You" want it so if you have the skills, the space and the time do it.

I'm doing a 35ft one at the moment. If I have questions or am unsure about anything I just run it past the Salty's on here and the problem is solved :-) After all, at the end of the day its better to have tried and failed than not to have tried at all but hey, that's not gonna be an issue for us woodies :-)

Scary 11-08-2012 09:14 AM

Is there a reason to limit size to 35'
 
Unlike a sailboat trawlers can be handled easily by a couple up into the 50' range. If your looking for livability and comfort, a forty foot or larger boat has a lot to offer without adding a lot to the cost of operation. Some of the features these larger boats offer is home style refrigerators, stoves, washers and driers, walk around queen size beds, closet space, real human size showers with real water pressure, dedicated spaces that don't have to morph into beds from dinettes or coaches. And capacities, waste, water and fuel that really make it possible to be independent for weeks at a time. Older fiberglass yachts are at rock bottom prices and offer a lot of value. Why limit your choices to smaller boats.

boatpoker 11-08-2012 08:11 PM

We cruised on a 37' full displacement trawler for many years between Lake Superior, the gulf and Bahamas. Along came the grandkids who spend a lot of time with us so we got a 42' boat so they could have their own room.

We found that the extra 5' locked us out of many of the small anchorages on the icw and many of the free docks. Go with the smallest boat you can be comfortable with.

I think this is pertinent as the OP mentioned Florida and the Bahamas.

Gopro, you might find some useful info on ICW cruising at Primer For First Timers Heading South

Nomad Willy 11-08-2012 09:20 PM

Everyone is different but to me the hull design is the most important thing. Lots of other things enter into it but the hull is the main feature but only if you appreciate what a hull can do for you. All this talk about galley up or down, aft cockpit or no, twin or single ect ect amuses me. Give me a great hull whose lines are sweet music and I'll take whatever else comes with it ... more or less.

healhustler 11-08-2012 09:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by manyboats;
Give me a great hull whose lines are sweet music and I'll take whatever else comes with it ... more or less.

Easy for you to say, Eric. Willy has great lines. I have to say "give me a waddling, fat bottomed moma and I'll take whatever else comes with it". Seriously though, if I were looking for a trawler now, I'd be making a list of ways i'd use it, where I'd want to take it, the features I didn't want to compromise on, and then I'd find the best and dryest hull I could to do the job.

Northern Spy 11-08-2012 10:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by manyboats (Post 111933)
Everyone is different but to me the hull design is the most important thing. Lots of other things enter into it but the hull is the main feature but only if you appreciate what a hull can do for you. All this talk about galley up or down, aft cockpit or no, twin or single ect ect amuses me. Give me a great hull whose lines are sweet music and I'll take whatever else comes with it ... more or less.

Yes. That and sheer line.

Marin 11-08-2012 11:43 PM

Northern Spy--- What's your avatar photo from?

RT Firefly 11-09-2012 12:00 AM

Das boot
Klaus Wennemann/Fritz Grade I think

Marin 11-09-2012 12:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RT Firefly (Post 111961)
Das boot
Klaus Wennemann/Fritz Grade I think

Great movie, particularly the original German language version.

Tom.B 11-09-2012 05:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Marin (Post 111962)
Great movie, particularly the original German language version.

+1x10^6

swampu 11-09-2012 06:00 AM

Gopro, I looked at a eagle trawler here on the MS Gulfcoast and they wanted 15k. Had a ford lemon and similar to what you describe.
http://www.trawlerforum.com/attachme...986421ae0e.jpg
http://www.trawlerforum.com/attachme...81852c43e2.jpg

ksanders 11-09-2012 06:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by healhustler (Post 111940)
Easy for you to say, Eric. Willy has great lines. I have to say "give me a waddling, fat bottomed moma and I'll take whatever else comes with it". Seriously though, if I were looking for a trawler now, I'd be making a list of ways i'd use it, where I'd want to take it, the features I didn't want to compromise on, and then I'd find the best and dryest hull I could to do the job.


I'm with you on this.

function over form makes for a more comfortable boat.

jwnall 11-09-2012 08:21 AM

I did the sailing life for 17 years, and just recently sold the Allied Mistress 39 and bought a used Gulfstar 36 trawler. My reasons were about the same as the OP. I decided that I really was just using the sailboat as a powerboat, and that life would be easier with a tad more luxury. The Gulfstar 36 has turned out to be just exactly what I was looking for. The only downside that I have found so far is that the trawler rolls a lot more in an anchorage than I would like. The sailboat was usually rock solid, and even in bad conditions the roll was gentle enough so that it was not any problem.

Nomad Willy 11-09-2012 10:28 AM

healhustler,
I think you misunderstood me. I didn't mean that I would seek the most beautiful hull I could find at all. I would seek the best hull I could find and it would be a plus if it was beautiful but primarily it would need to have a hull that would allow it to be very good at being a boat on good days and bad. And if Spy actually buys a boat based on it's sheer line he's think'in w his butt instead of his head. No offense Spy as I'm sure you don't do that. But there are a lot of boat owners here that think like ksanders says he does and would or does buy a boat based only on all the well researched factual information. Computer dating would appeal to such people. As close to the perfect boat as possible would result to be sure but guys we're doing yachts and fun and pride of ownership is high w most of us. One should select a garbage truck that way but selection of a yacht should have some or a great deal of passion and even some art heavily involved in the process and the end result. We can pick out TVs, toilets, wheelbarrows, dish washers ect from consumer reports facts regarding the "best" product but not our pleasure boats or yachts. We're all different though and one man buys a Toyota and another a Jaguar. We've only got one life and mine for one is getting shorter so at this time in my life I think I could do well w the Jaguar ... assuming it was/is as sweet to drive as they are to look at. So perhaps looking at a boat should start by looking at owners (or owner) and objectively evaluate the balance of emotional and artistic needs to the most practical boat that would probably be chosen by a committee of lawyers and city planning people.
That said I'm going to admit I've owned a Jaguar and done computer dating.

PS:
I actually like the boat swampu posted pics of. Just to confuse a few people.
It looks like it could be on a CHB 34 hull.

Northern Spy 11-09-2012 11:08 AM

Meh. Form follows function. A good hull and sheer line go together most of the times.

But I really do dislike ugly boats; and there are a lot of them out there...


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