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-   -   Heat Shrink waterproof wire connectors (http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s4/heat-shrink-waterproof-wire-connectors-47032.html)

CDreamer 10-11-2019 02:45 PM

Heat Shrink waterproof wire connectors
 
Saw a product that looks to be a good alternative to small soldered wire connections.

https://dayproud.com/products/waterp...ire-connectors

O C Diver 10-11-2019 03:12 PM

Think I'll stay with 3M heat shrink butt connectors.

Ted

Comodave 10-11-2019 03:14 PM

If I am not mistaken, I think ABYC recommendations a mechanical connection not just soldered. If the wire gets hot enough the solder can melt and the connection would be lost. And the solder can create a hard spot in the wire and it may be more prone to break the wire where the solder stops.

RT Firefly 10-11-2019 04:02 PM

Greetings,
Hmm....May work well on non oxidized (new) wire but what about the OEM wiring to your ??whatever that has a layer of copper oxide on every strand? Is there a flux included in the sleeve?

OldDan1943 10-11-2019 04:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by O C Diver (Post 810266)
Think I'll stay with 3M heat shrink butt connectors.

Ted

+1 :thumb:

localboy 10-11-2019 04:24 PM

I tried this type of connectors, once. Same idea I bought on Amazon. They did not work as advertised. I cut them off.

psneeld 10-11-2019 04:39 PM

Not sure a Western Union splice satisfys ABYC mechanical requirement (should)...some experts do and then this would be fine if you are confident the solder is really doing it's job.


From Wikipedia...


However, when examined in tensile strength ("pull") tests by NASA on 16 and 22 AW gauge wire, even the short tie variation of the Western Union splice performed well after soldering: when spliced and soldered carefully to standard instructions, the test splices never failed at the splice (instead breaking outside of the splice area), leaving NASA to conclude that "the solder connection at the splice was as strong or stronger than the un-spliced wires."[2][3]

Dougcole 10-11-2019 04:49 PM

Interesting. And though I agree with the comments above, it might be a good solution for very small ring terminals, like for the stupidly small gauge wire that gets used on most electronics. I currently strip about an inch and then fold over the stripped wire once or twice. It works, but it always feels kind of jury rigged to me, and the jackets don't shrink down around the wire as well as I'd like.

kchace 10-11-2019 05:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CDreamer (Post 810256)
Saw a product that looks to be a good alternative to small soldered wire connections.

https://dayproud.com/products/waterp...ire-connectors

I also thought these looked great for certain applications. So a couple of months ago I bought a set of those connectors to try and they failed miserably. I brought them into my electrical lab in work and under perfect conditions with perfect, brand new tinned wire, they were hit or miss to properly flow the solder and even when they did the connection was very weak.

I strongly recommend not using them.

Ken

Maerin 10-11-2019 07:53 PM

There's no mechanical joint, they don't meet ABYC standards. There are few instances where soldering is acceptable in ABYC standards, a butt splice isn't one of them. (Certain main battery terminals are addressed.)

The vendor promotes they "allow people to connect wires without any technical background" If your technical background doesn't include the capability to make up a proper crimped terminal, I don't believe this product is your salvation. :rolleyes:

psneeld 10-11-2019 08:00 PM

Curiosity from other professional input has me wondering....Where does the ABYC say a Western Union splice isn't mechanical?


If it and other forms of mechancal joining are not satisfactory, OR if ONLY a properly, crimped, adhesive, heat shrink butt connector is by far the best....why don't they just say that?

C lectric 10-11-2019 08:17 PM

Practical Sailor recently tested these and the result was inconsistent joins.
If you want to solder then actually solder and THEN slide a piece of sealant lined heat shrink over the joint and shrink it.

catalinajack 10-12-2019 09:17 AM

I tried those. I'm with Ted. I will atick with heat sheink connextors. Waterproof is good.
Quote:

Originally Posted by O C Diver (Post 810266)
Think I'll stay with 3M heat shrink butt connectors.

Ted


CMS 10-12-2019 09:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by psneeld (Post 810311)
Not sure a Western Union splice satisfys ABYC mechanical requirement (should)...some experts do and then this would be fine if you are confident the solder is really doing it's job.


From Wikipedia...


However, when examined in tensile strength ("pull") tests by NASA on 16 and 22 AW gauge wire, even the short tie variation of the Western Union splice performed well after soldering: when spliced and soldered carefully to standard instructions, the test splices never failed at the splice (instead breaking outside of the splice area), leaving NASA to conclude that "the solder connection at the splice was as strong or stronger than the un-spliced wires."[2][3]

Form my recollection, that testing was on solid conductor wire. If I remember correctly, and that study is on my hard drive at the shop, NASA disallows WU splices in multi-conductor wire.

psneeld 10-12-2019 01:56 PM

True the NASA standard does note solid conductors. But ABYC doesn't speak of prohibitions, just meeting standards.


So the question remains, even on stranded wire, if it meets the pull and support test, and is a mechanical connection in addition to soldering...does it not meet ABYC standards?


Aren't different methods allowed and that's why they "don't" specify a particular method?

ssobol 10-12-2019 10:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Comodave (Post 810268)
... If the wire gets hot enough the solder can melt and the connection would be lost....

If the wire gets hot enough to melt the solder you have much bigger problems.

Comodave 10-12-2019 10:04 PM

Maybe, maybe not a huge problem if it is a small wire. It might not take much of an over current to heat the wire if the connection wasn’t good from the start. It may just be a problem with say something unimportant like the VHF... Remember we aren’t talking battery cables here.

DDW 10-12-2019 10:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by psneeld (Post 810581)
True the NASA standard does note solid conductors. But ABYC doesn't speak of prohibitions, just meeting standards.


So the question remains, even on stranded wire, if it meets the pull and support test, and is a mechanical connection in addition to soldering...does it not meet ABYC standards?


Aren't different methods allowed and that's why they "don't" specify a particular method?

I haven't seen the report mentioned, but the ABYC beef with soldered connections is partially stress relief. In a soldered connection on tinned wire, it is difficult or impossible to control where the fusing stops. The wire is already tinned and will fuse just by bringing it to the melting point, no additional solder required. Usually on multi strand tinned, it you solder in one place the wire will be stiff some distance from the actual joint. This can make the wire flex (due to movement, vibration, etc) in a very limited length at an unpredictable location, and copper being a work hardening material, it is likely to fail there. If you can manage a soldered connection with an addition mechanical strain relief, then it should be as good as a crimped connection.

Of course crimped connections are not immune from work hardening failure, but with good terminals there is a softer flex area and the location is predicable.

Comodave 10-12-2019 10:21 PM

Is it that the traditional way of crimping and heat shrinking that much work and effort that people are looking for some really simple way to do this? I donít understand the issue with a crimp and heat shrink, it has only worked for many decades. Or is it just that people want to argue and prove their point of view??? Because I think this has taken way too much effort on discussing this. More effort than doing a proper crimp and shrink...

Seevee 10-12-2019 10:49 PM

I'm quite happy with the Ancor heat shrink crimp terminals. Not the cheapest but work very well.



I could argue that this is not a place to get cheap parts.


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