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-   -   Users' Opinions On Various Makes of Engines Needed (http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s6/users-opinions-various-makes-engines-needed-35591.html)

Latitude 26 06-17-2018 04:03 PM

Thanks for the post. Many of us have had the experience of some snarky mechanic or technician implying how foolish we were for buying a boat with (fill in the blanks) engines or electronics etc. So, you are smart to ask for general opinions and experiences with various engines. Of course we are dealing in generalities, but what else is available? How else would you know about engine life, service and parts issues and availability? Nothing stays the same. Engines that were once highly regarded may have lost favor with the marine community. Isn't that the purpose of sharing experiences on a forum? Keep doing your due diligence now instead of later.
Larry
Latitude26

Nomad Willy 06-17-2018 05:56 PM

Ski wrote;
“Many high output diesels lower the compression ratio to minimize temps and thermal stress on pistons and heads.”

I would think that running under a light load w a low compression engine would result in poor performance. What think?

DD788Snipe 03-28-2019 05:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gaston (Post 609359)


Hino inline 6 cylinder diesel engines are made by Toyota Heavy industries LTD. They also manufacture Hino medium duty trucks.

Not bad engines. I've had 2 friends that owned Bayliner 3870s with those engines and had very little trouble with them. They are naturally asperated engines.

BandB 03-28-2019 09:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DD788Snipe (Post 752407)
Hino inline 6 cylinder diesel engines are made by Toyota Heavy industries LTD. They also manufacture Hino medium duty trucks.

Not bad engines. I've had 2 friends that owned Bayliner 3870s with those engines and had very little trouble with them. They are naturally asperated engines.

A little truth and a little confusion to all the comments. As to Isuzu, Hino was a spinoff from the company that became Isuzu, but that was long ago, in the 40's. As to Ford, some Ford models sold in Australia, New Zealand, and around that area were actually rebadged Hino's for the 80's and nearly all the 90's. Hino today is 50.1% owned by Toyota but a publicly traded company of it's own. Hino's main businesses are trucks and buses. They once built cars but stopped that in the 60's.

Oh, and as to marine engines, they built large marine engines prior to and through WW II but were forced to stop after the war. Clearly their diesel engines subsequently found their way back to the water.

Very interesting life they've had.

Commander Nomad 03-29-2019 07:25 AM

Hino also builds low volume Toyota vehicles in their truck plant. The Toyota FJ Cruiser was built there, and a few other models.

I would count Hino diesels in a prospective boat to purchase as a neutral to positive attribute.

smitty477 03-29-2019 08:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Commander Nomad (Post 752530)
Hino also builds low volume Toyota vehicles in their truck plant. The Toyota FJ Cruiser was built there, and a few other models.

I would count Hino diesels in a prospective boat to purchase as a neutral to positive attribute.

For those that have not had the experience with Hino engines I can vouch for them 100%. We have had 4 pairs (8) Hino's over the past 30 years which were utilized at mostly higher cruising speeds (15-17 knots) on larger boats for over 1,000 nmiles per season and they were both robust and very economical.
The older EH700 series is plenty tough in either the non turbo (175hp) or turbo form (220hp) and the later model WO6 Series is just as tough in the 315Hp version - although not representing large problems the lower hp version of the WO6 series (WO6 D TI I) at 250 hp should be avoided as it has a few items on the engine which are less robust. I was introduced to these engines when I was a field service engineer in the 1070's and visited factories in Japan. Typically a rack of 8-12 EH700 engines were utilized in production to produce very clean DC power for plating lines and they ran 24/7/365 with little down time. FWIW - we have also owned a bunch of other diesels in the past both land an marine such as Lemanns, Perkins, GMC, Navistar, Cummins, Yanmar, lister petter, etc.
I prefer the Hino to all the other diesels I have experienced.
YMMV

smitty477 03-29-2019 08:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BandB (Post 752471)
A little truth and a little confusion to all the comments. As to Isuzu, Hino was a spinoff from the company that became Isuzu, but that was long ago, in the 40's. As to Ford, some Ford models sold in Australia, New Zealand, and around that area were actually rebadged Hino's for the 80's and nearly all the 90's. Hino today is 50.1% owned by Toyota but a publicly traded company of it's own. Hino's main businesses are trucks and buses. They once built cars but stopped that in the 60's.

Oh, and as to marine engines, they built large marine engines prior to and through WW II but were forced to stop after the war. Clearly their diesel engines subsequently found their way back to the water.

Very interesting life they've had.

What may be of great interest is the affects that Shigeo Shingo and his team and son have had on the quality and robust nature of their engines. I had met him briefly many years ago and his teams contributions to production quality have been copied for the past 50+ years now.


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