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-   -   Underwater lighting experiences (http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s4/underwater-lighting-experiences-33058.html)

Benthic2 07-18-2017 10:43 PM

well...please check back in....if no one else explained it...please feel free. It looked like a good install to me, so I obviously need to learn this.

Group9 07-19-2017 06:01 AM

Thanks for all of the replies.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sealife (Post 574467)
Simi 60, that is the one I use. It comes in green, blue, and white. I think I got them on amazon for $13. Still good two years later. Gives a nice 360* vs. just out the back. I can drop one off bow, one off stern and usully get 150' circle of light.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Simi 60 (Post 574462)
If you want a similar result with no holes in the hull, no lift and a $50 spend.

GREEN Underwater fishing light Bright Squid Fish Prawn 180 LED Light. 12-24V | eBay

I have to admit, I like the idea of 1) $13 or $50 and 2) low installation cost and trouble!

I had looked at these, but was afraid they wouldn't put out enough light. But, I can definitely live with 150 feet of lighted area.

It also seems like a good way to test the concept without committing completely. :)

psneeld 07-19-2017 06:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Benthic2 (Post 574665)
well...please check back in....if no one else explained it...please feel free. It looked like a good install to me, so I obviously need to learn this.

There are better ways of installing said light....

Such as predrilling all the holes oversized and filling with epoxy then screwing into the epoxy plugs......

But it was installed correctly to the industry standard, probably just like in the instructions, not the highest possible level.

For a boat that probably lives on a trailer anyway, not sure the highest standard is anything more but overkill.

Most guys would rather fish today and fix some rot in the transom 20 years from now....oh thats right, :D.... it may never be there and they wont own the boat any more......;)

Group9 07-19-2017 06:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sea Q (Post 574476)
I bought and installed two on the transom of our 19 foot tender
It looks real cool at night and it does attract fish and shrimp at night
I put the lights on so that when at night when beaching the boat I could see what was under the water
Lady smith BC has a coal beach that at a low tide has a lot of old steel parts

And, that, is another great idea.

We will we taking our center console as our big tender on our upcoming trip. The idea of punching holes in it's transom (it's cored with solid waterproof 3M Liquid Transom compound already) is a lot more appealing than putting in in the big boat's hull.

Would make a great test bed!

RT Firefly 07-19-2017 06:11 AM

Greetings,
Regardless of the various lighting options, I think Mr ps's suggestion of gluing a block on the transom and THEN screwing into the block is the best suggestion thus far.

Group9 07-19-2017 06:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RT Firefly (Post 574693)
Greetings,
Regardless of the various lighting options, I think Mr ps's suggestion of gluing a block on the transom and THEN screwing into the block is the best suggestion thus far.

Yeah, that's a good one, too. Lot's of good ideas and thoughts. The discussion went in a different direction than I was thinking, and that's what I needed.

Art 07-19-2017 08:50 AM

Maybe I'm incorrect in my thought pattern... but...

Seems to me that having permanently affixed uw lights is OK but not necessary. I wonder if there already exists a way to have uw lights with their own rechargeable battery [similar to a drill battery]. Lights with battery could be attached to a "floater". That way the floater with light[s] could be dropped into water anywhere off the boat with attachment by a thin line for retrieval.

To go the next step: Floater could have a small jet motor in it and by remote control the floater could be made to take the light[s] any place near the boat as well as anywhere alongside the boat.

Little fishes need night lights too! :lol:

:popcorn:

hmason 07-19-2017 09:04 AM

Seems to me that the under water lights are simply a form of boat bling. I agree that watching the fish etc. is interesting but for how long? YMMV.

Art 07-19-2017 09:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hmason (Post 574740)
Seems to me that the under water lights are simply a form of boat bling. I agree that watching the fish etc. is interesting but for how long? YMMV.

"Pleasure Boats" in and of themselves are BIG BLING! :lol:

psneeld 07-19-2017 09:12 AM

Installed systems require the least amount of additional effort...thus the least forgotten or other issues....

For some who like it or for fishermen, all night every night is the right amount of illumination. For some it is to be cool, for others it is hours or more of entertainment.

Sometimes it takes hours till you attract what you want.

Group9 07-19-2017 10:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hmason (Post 574740)
Seems to me that the under water lights are simply a form of boat bling. I agree that watching the fish etc. is interesting but for how long? YMMV.

I'm a simple man. I still enjoy just sitting and watching the sunrise and sunset every day when we are cruising. If I had fish to watch, my wife would probably think I had had a seizure. :D

FlyWright 07-19-2017 12:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Benthic2 (Post 574665)
well...please check back in....if no one else explained it...please feel free. It looked like a good install to me, so I obviously need to learn this.

1. I'd NEVER use silicone as an underwater sealant. I'd use one of several products intended for below-waterline use.

2. I'd pay special attention to sealing the drilled holes into the wood transom. The installer drilled a large hole for the wire, fed the wire through the bare hole, then squirted some silicone into the hole from the inside of the transom hoping it would fully cover and seal the hole. I wouldn't want to bet the life of my transom that I got that right on the first attempt. Wrong product and wrong technique.

3. Given the choice, I'd opt for a mounting board attached to the transom with 5200 that would accommodate the mounting screws to preserve the integrity of the transom.

4. He's already got one wire hanging over the top of the transom and the light kit includes a mounting plate to allow redirecting the wire. Why not route the cable to above the waterline and drill a hole through the transom above the WL? A properly sealed hole above the WL with a clamshell cover would look professional and help preserve the integrity of the transom.

Art 07-19-2017 01:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FlyWright (Post 574798)
1. I'd NEVER use silicone as an underwater sealant. I'd use one of several products intended for below-waterline use.

2. I'd pay special attention to sealing the drilled holes into the wood transom. The installer drilled a large hole for the wire, fed the wire through the bare hole, then squirted some silicone into the hole from the inside of the transom hoping it would fully cover and seal the hole. I wouldn't want to bet the life of my transom that I got that right on the first attempt. Wrong product and wrong technique.

3. Given the choice, I'd opt for a mounting board attached to the transom with 5200 that would accommodate the mounting screws to preserve the integrity of the transom.

4. He's already got one wire hanging over the top of the transom and the light kit includes a mounting plate to allow redirecting the wire. Why not route the cable to above the waterline and drill a hole through the transom above the WL? A properly sealed hole above the WL with a clamshell cover would look professional and help preserve the integrity of the transom.

And, there you have it! My thoughts exactly!!

Benthic2 07-19-2017 02:10 PM

Thanks. The list of materials at the beginning said "silicone/marine sealant"

I also noticed that he already had a wire running down the transom, so why not just add this one to that.

dhays 07-19-2017 03:08 PM

UW lights might be interesting and attractive in a boat that spends its time in clear water but I can't see it for Puget Sound. We have very murky water. There is just so much organic matter in the water that we have very poor visibility. Lights under the water would likely end up looking like a green glow regardless of the color.

AusCan 07-19-2017 03:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hmason (Post 574740)
Seems to me that the under water lights are simply a form of boat bling. I agree that watching the fish etc. is interesting but for how long? YMMV.

Until your grandchildren grow up.....

hmason 07-19-2017 03:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AusCan (Post 574862)
Until your grandchildren grow up.....

I must confess you have a point there.

psneeld 07-19-2017 04:30 PM

I believe the light had a tapered rubber fitting on it so when screwed in, it plugged the hole where the wire went through.

So just a smear of someting should have made it watertight.

Not probably the best for big boats, but for 6 inches underwater on a trailerable boat???

Bruce B 07-20-2017 08:44 PM

4 Attachment(s)
We have a pair of nicely installed underwater lights on our tug. They are multi colored and we love them. At least I do...
Left them on tonight when we went out to meet friends and came back to this...
Bruce

Mkeller 07-20-2017 09:21 PM

There is an advantage to through hull lights where the light remains inside the boat. Eventually the lights fail. With a light mounted inside the boat you can replace the lamp without having to haul the boat. This was a huge deal in the days of filament lamps, but not quite as big a concern with LED. But potted LED's still go bad.

I'm replacing several unneeded transducers and through hulls with underwater lights. Faster to cut a bigger hole and install a Lloyds of London approved light than patch the hole. I have zero concerns that a glass lens intended for use on high speed battle wagons and yachts is going to ever receive enough of an impact at 8 mph to break.


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