Trawler Forum

Trawler Forum (http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/)
-   Anchors and Anchoring (http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s42/)
-   -   SS Badger docking maneuver (http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s42/ss-badger-docking-maneuver-21833.html)

fryedaze 08-21-2015 08:40 PM

SS Badger docking maneuver
 
10 Attachment(s)
We are in Ludington and got to see the SS Badger dock. The captain uses the anchor to spin the boat and dock. It was slick. I looked up some pictures and he is using an engine order telegraph to ring up bells. The SS Badger is a coal fired steam ship ferry between Ludington and Manitowoc WI. Keep you eye on the anchor chain.

HopCar 08-21-2015 08:46 PM

Very cool. I'd love to see that.
I'd like to see the engine room too.
Of course his anchor is too small, it's the wrong kind and he doesn't have enough chain.

MurrayM 08-21-2015 08:47 PM

What a wus. We can dock our Badger without pivoting on anchor chains, or using thrusters ;)

BruceK 08-21-2015 10:03 PM

Wow, a coal fired RoRo steamer. And from the last pic it looks like one of two.
As Chinese coal demand wanes, and burning coal approaches the popularity of leprosy, there is still a chance to sell some coal.

Blissboat 08-21-2015 10:36 PM

Fascinating, and great photos, Dave. Thanks for posting.

That does look like a near sister docked just aft of Badger - didn't realize there is another cross-lake ferry similar to the old Badger. A few years back there were reports that she would be forced to stop running, owing to its mechanical obsolescence.

siestakey 08-21-2015 10:49 PM

WOW I want a visit and if not a video thanks for the pics amazing

harbor950 08-21-2015 11:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by siestakey (Post 361097)
WOW I want a visit and if not a video thanks for the pics amazing


Try this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJQDwGTF2Ls



You might find a video you like here:



https://www.google.com/search?q=yout...d&q=+ss+badger

Wayfarer 08-21-2015 11:35 PM

She goes charging into Ludington like a herd of Buffalo. It always makes me a little nervous... haha. If for some reason that anchor was ever to fail, seems like she'd pile up on shore in a hurry.

The sistership is the Spartan, which has been inactive for many years now. Badger was in danger of being shut down due to the fact that she needed to dispose of her coal ash while underway, and had been dumping it in the lake for decades. She can't do that anymore, but has come up with a way to store it and put it ashore. I think she's got some new scrubbers too, so she doesn't belch quite so much black coal smoke as she used to. It was quite a thing to see a few years ago. A real blast from the past.

BruceK 08-22-2015 02:16 AM

Thank you harbor950, and thank you Wayfarer.
How many coal fired steamships remain in commercial use? There are several here in historic fleets, and used for tourism and charter. The SS Earnslaw, based on Lake Wakatipu at Queenstown, on the southern island of New Zealand, does tourist trips but also services farms and other establishments on the lake, and should qualify as a working vessel.

Manly Q. 08-22-2015 03:19 AM

Thanks for posting that was pretty work.

David.

fryedaze 08-22-2015 05:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wayfarer (Post 361111)
She goes charging into Ludington like a herd of Buffalo. It always makes me a little nervous... haha. If for some reason that anchor was ever to fail, seems like she'd pile up on shore in a hurry.

The sistership is the Spartan, which has been inactive for many years now. Badger was in danger of being shut down due to the fact that she needed to dispose of her coal ash while underway, and had been dumping it in the lake for decades. She can't do that anymore, but has come up with a way to store it and put it ashore. I think she's got some new scrubbers too, so she doesn't belch quite so much black coal smoke as she used to. It was quite a thing to see a few years ago. A real blast from the past.

The Spartan is set up to haul train cars. It has four train tracks running through the cargo bay. Its no longer in use. There is some footage on YouTube

Donsan 08-22-2015 06:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fryedaze (Post 361125)
The Spartan is set up to haul train cars. It has four train tracks running through the cargo bay. Its no longer in use. There is some footage on YouTube

The Badger was originally set up for hauling train cars. We took the SS Badger across the lake on a return trip from California a couple of years ago.

Back in the 1970's. There was another ferry that ran from Frankfort to Kewaunee. They also transported train cars. When we took it around 1977, train cars and autos shared the ferry. One of the older ferries is now permanently docked on Lake Manistee and I believe they tried to rent out rooms like a motel.

what_barnacles 08-22-2015 02:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wayfarer (Post 361111)
She goes charging into Ludington like a herd of Buffalo. It always makes me a little nervous... haha. If for some reason that anchor was ever to fail, seems like she'd pile up on shore in a hurry.

"Thas mah boat..."

http://speakinggump.com/wp-content/u...st-Gump-80.jpg

markpierce 08-22-2015 04:42 PM

Does the ship have mechanical stokers or is there a gang with shovels to feed the boilers?

Off Duty 08-22-2015 05:10 PM

Very, very cool!

Wayfarer 08-22-2015 09:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by markpierce (Post 361271)
Does the ship have mechanical stokers or is there a gang with shovels to feed the boilers?


It's an automated system.

BruceK 08-22-2015 11:42 PM

A quick search shows the Badger was launched in 1952, which seems late for a coal burning steam ship. The SS South Steyne, a 1200 ton Manly ferry, built in Leith Scotland in 1938 was oil fired. She took 6 weeks to steam her way to Sydney on her delivery voyage and carried reserve drums of fuel oil, and also carried 20 tons of coal for emergency use,(both back up fuel sources broke loose in a gale and required re-securing) meaning the boilers could be fired using either fuel.
I just wonder why a coal burner was built so late, maybe there was a plentiful easy coal supply.

harbor950 08-23-2015 01:46 AM

Coal was surpassed by oil much earlier than that. By WWI for the most part. But there were special circumstances through the years. I don't know about the Badger, but there are others ships as well as a Florida company that is trying to develop an efficient, powdered coal engine now Cyclone Power Technologies - Cyclone Engine

Also, in 1940, Great Britain ordered 60 coal fired steam Liberty Ships because of more secure local access to coal supplies.

What follows is from articles about coal fired steam ships built in the early 1980's in response to special local circumstances and the 1973 energy crisis and consequent oil price rise.



———————

River Embley marks the end of an era (May 2012)


The withdrawal from service of River Embley this week marks the closing of a unique chapter in bulk shipping.

River Embley, and her sister ship River Boyne, are the only commercially-trading coal-fired bulk carriers in the world and have spent their 30-odd years as floating bauxite conveyors between Weipa and Gladstone, Queensland.


The pair was half of an innovative quartet of built for the Australian coastal bauxite trade in the early 1980’s. The other two vessels, Endeavour River and Fitzroy River (ex TNT Carpentaria and TNT Capricornia) were built in Italy for TNT Bulkships while River Embley and River Boyne were built at Mitsubishi’s Nagasaki shipyard for ANL.

At the time of their design, fuel oil bunkers were at historicaly high levels and Queensland had plentiful, cheap steaming coal. Though built at different Yards and to different designs, the principles are the same. Coal is loaded into gravity-fed hoppers adjacent to the accommodation. Automatic coal handling systems deliver the coal on to moving conveyor grates running through the boilers driving steam turbines and a single propeller.




Despite running on a solid fuel, the vessels were classed UMS (Unmanned Machinery Space) meaning they would run automated with day-working Engineers. At normal sea speed, the ships consumed between 180 and 240 tonnes of coal a day. Increasing maintenance costs, and their replacement by more standard Post-Panamax bulk carriers, means their time has come and River Embley will sail from Gladstone next week to Singapore and new Owners.

The Antipodean Mariner Antipodean Mariner: River Embley marks the end of an era



From 1981:


And in the United States, where no coal-powered ship has been built since 1953, New England Electric has contracted with General Dynamics Corporation to construct a $60-million coal-fired vessel at its Quincy, Mass., Shipyard. The ship will carry 2.2 million tons of coal annually along the Eastern seaboard, using about 1 percent of the cargo for its own power.

Coal-powered ships: a nostalgic way to cut costs - CSMonitor.com

Wayfarer 08-23-2015 02:06 AM

Coal is still plentiful and cheap in the American Midwest. There are still several coal power plants around the lakes, though I'm always hearing about them being shut down or converted to natural gas. Frankly, I won't miss hauling the stuff. It's nasty.

RickB 08-23-2015 05:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by harbor950 (Post 361384)
I don't know about the Badger, but there are others ships ...

Among them the 1983 built SS Energy Enterprise which is currently offloading in New Orleans.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:47 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012