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-   -   Canadians: What's the Pacific Northwest? (http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s51/canadians-whats-pacific-northwest-19137.html)

Giggitoni 03-02-2015 10:01 PM

Canadians: What's the Pacific Northwest?
 
For my Canadian friends....do you folks call our Pacific Northwest the Pacific Southwest? Wouldn't your Pacific Northwest include areas around Tuk Penninsula? Just asking. Good night...

Marin 03-02-2015 10:17 PM

The answer to that will have to come from Canada. But if you really want to stir up the ant hill, ask for opinions about the Salish Sea.:)

Northern Spy 03-02-2015 10:34 PM

It is called "the coast".

West 03-02-2015 10:40 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Giggitoni (Post 313059)
For my Canadian friends....do you folks call our Pacific Northwest the Pacific Southwest? Wouldn't your Pacific Northwest include areas around Tuk Penninsula? Just asking. Good night...

The PNW is a geographical area of North America.
Google is your friend :rolleyes:
In other news, California used to be part of Mexico

Giggitoni 03-02-2015 11:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by West (Post 313073)
........ California used to be part of Mexico

I got news for ya'. California del Norte is coming back to life right before our very eyes.

Giggitoni 03-02-2015 11:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by West (Post 313073)
The PNW is a geographical area of North America.
Google is your friend :rolleyes:
In other news, California used to be part of Mexico

Google is not my friend when it misses the point.... Your "friend" is looking at the PNW from the USA perspective. My question was from a Canadian perspective.

Of course, we could assume the Pacific Northwest could mean the Province of Kamchatka...

Marin 03-02-2015 11:53 PM

I don't think many people up here south of the border would agree with Google anyways. I have never heard anyone here include northern California in the definition of the Pacific Northwest. Some people, including me, don't even include southern Oregon in the definition.

While everyone's idea of the "border" will differ, the impression I've gotten from the time I moved here in 1979 from folks in this area (Puget Sound) is that the PNW starts at about the middle of Oregon, maybe Newport or thereabouts and continues on up to the Canadian border.

Going east the PNW encompasses Idaho and even western Montana depending on who you're talking to, but not eastern Montana.

I've always considered the PNW to be a section of the US. I've always thought of BC as is it's own entity even before I moved here. I refer to the coast north of the border as the BC coast or the BC raincoast.

West 03-03-2015 12:10 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Marin (Post 313085)
I've always considered the PNW to be a section of the US. I've always thought of BC as is it's own entity even before I moved here. I refer to the coast north of the border as the BC coast or the BC raincoast.

Here is an educational map you can use for future reference, so you don't get too many laughs in your travels abroad. :D

Marin 03-03-2015 12:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by West (Post 313088)
Here is an educational map you can use for future reference, so you don't get too many laughs in your travels abroad. :D


Well, that's meaningless. It's an attractions map and includes as much real estate as they can cram onto it. Probably at the insistance of the attractions.

Here is the best and most accurate definiton of the Pacific Northwest I've seen to date.

"The Pacific Northwest (in the United States, commonly abbreviated as PNW), sometimes referred to as Cascadia, is a region in western North Ameriica bounded by the Pacific Ocean to the west and, loosely, by the Rocky Mountains on the east. Though no agreed boundary exists, a common conception includes the US States of Oregon, Washington, and the Canadian province of British Columbia. Broader conceptions reach north into Alaska and Yukon, south into the coastal and mountainous regions of Northern California, and east into Idaho and Western Montana, western Wyoming, and western Alberta, to the Continental Divide. Narrower conceptions may be limited to the Northwestern US or to the coastal areas west of the Cascade and Coast mountains. The variety of definitions can be attributed to partially overlapping commonalities of the region's history, geography, society, and other factors."

In other words, the Pacific Northwest can mean anything you damn well want it to mean as long as it doesn't include Maine or Newfoundland.

Conrad 03-03-2015 02:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Northern Spy (Post 313071)
It is called "the coast".

Yup. It's that simple.

Alaskan Sea-Duction 03-03-2015 10:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Conrad (Post 313092)
Yup. It's that simple.


BC Coast....:blush:

Xsbank 03-03-2015 11:10 AM

"The Coast" is what the local denizens of BC's Sunshine Coast (Sechelt Penninsula) call their area. "Goin' to The Coast tomorrow."

PNW is the same concept as "the short term" or " the long term" that economists use.

West 03-03-2015 11:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Marin (Post 313090)

Here is the best and most accurate definiton of the Pacific Northwest I've seen to date.

"The Pacific Northwest (in the United States, commonly abbreviated as PNW), sometimes referred to as Cascadia, is a region in western North Ameriica bounded by the Pacific Ocean to the west and, loosely, by the Rocky Mountains on the east. Though no agreed boundary exists, a common conception includes the US States of Oregon, Washington, and the Canadian province of British Columbia.

See map above :rolleyes:
* most folks would agree that Montana & Idaho shouldn't be there.

Marin 03-03-2015 11:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by West (Post 313177)
See map above :rolleyes:
* most folks would agree that Montana & Idaho shouldn't be there.

Depends on who you talk to. I know a lot of folks who include Idaho. Most folks around here don't include British Columbia. As the definition says, there's no right answer.

eyschulman 03-03-2015 11:38 AM

This just proves for the 10 to the 100th power+ that people just can not agree on anything.

Alaskan Sea-Duction 03-03-2015 11:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eyschulman (Post 313184)
This just proves for the 10 to the 100th power+ that people just can not agree on anything.


Thus the pig war.....:facepalm:

West 03-03-2015 11:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eyschulman (Post 313184)
This just proves for the 10 to the 100th power+ that people just can not agree on anything.

There is a general consensus of facts, with the usual background noise. Some even believe that the Pacific stops at the 49th parallel.

Marin 03-03-2015 07:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by West (Post 313189)
There is a general consensus of facts..

Correct! That fact being that there is no general consensus for the defiinition.:lol:

Anyway, I'm glad to see that Giggitoni's actual question seems to have been somewhat answered by people in a position to know, and that is that most folks in BC refer to their coast as "The Coast."

I have always liked the name used in what I believe to be one of the finest collections of historical articles, stories, and photos ever done on a specific area, and that is the Raincoast Chronicles. I've got all but the last couple of them and have read most or all of each of the big bound editions.

Having flown for years up and down the BC coast as well as boating in parts of it, I think the term "raincoast" very aptly captures the feel and mood of the region.

Don't know how long the term will remain accurate given the rate the climate seems to be changing, but from a historical perspective the name is very appropriate.

ghost 03-04-2015 10:55 AM

Okay, so as a trawler group who can't agree on what a trawler is, or even how to use an anchor, we now add this?

Makes me want to grab my trawler here in the Pacific Northwest and head up North a ways so I can ask some Canadians if they are Americans or not.

Marin 03-04-2015 01:57 PM

If they can still speak after rolling around on the ground howling with laughter for fifteen minutes my guess is that they'll gasp out a "we couldn't be that sorry-a$sed even we wanted to be." Then they'd go off to a Tim Hortons to recover with a doughnut.


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