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-   -   Keel protection (http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s3/keel-protection-17767.html)

Donsan 12-04-2014 06:55 AM

Keel protection
 
1 Attachment(s)
Below is a pic of the keel of an Endeavour Power Cat. Does this type of keel design provide immunity to crab pots, lines and nets?

Donsan 12-04-2014 07:22 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Here is a better pic of the Endeavour Power Cat keel. Almost certainly it provides a lot of protection to the prop and shaft on grounding but I was wondering if lines could still wrap them.

djmarchand 12-04-2014 09:26 AM

That keel/prop design should take care of 99% of crab traps that you encounter. But once a line is wrapped around that prop, it won't be easy to get off. It will almost certainly require a diver.

David

bayview 12-04-2014 10:49 AM

certainly better than an open prop but crab pots are devious critters so I would not go driving through a field of them.

Xsbank 12-04-2014 01:39 PM

I can't see that being efficient - plus, getting in there to clean out and paint those pockets, having to remove the rudder to get out the wheel (probably), servicing the cutlas bearing? Another of those designs for things that were never intended to be serviced.

What happens if you do touch ground? 4 times the areas to be repaired? No thanks!

Donsan 12-04-2014 03:21 PM

1 Attachment(s)
This is what a previous poster used specifically for crab and lobster pots in the northeast:

http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s...ion-13936.html

He reported some parasitic drag from it. Dragging sea weed on the grating might be another issue. Guess a shaft mounted line cutter is the best approach. Certainly don't plan to intentionally run over crab or lobster pots but my previous experience on the Indian River is they are hard to avoid if you go out of the channel even a small amount.

BruceK 12-04-2014 04:17 PM

Looks a well protected prop, but what`s the effect of boxing it in on prop walk for maneuvering?

Sailor of Fortune 12-04-2014 05:12 PM

Those cages are common on downeast boats. Some have cages, others line cutters and many have prop cleanouts. The cleanouts are covered boxes, above the prop and waterline that give access to the propeller and shaft while the boats in the water. A knife mounted on a stick can take care of a tangle in minutes without having to dive.

twistedtree 12-04-2014 05:46 PM

I cant imagine that power cat rudder is very effective tucked away like that.

RT Firefly 12-04-2014 05:56 PM

Greetings,
Mr. tt. I would think the rudder would be more effective being directly in line with a "contained" discharge from the prop "tunnel"...no?

dwhatty 12-04-2014 05:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Donsan (Post 288583)
This is what a previous poster used specifically for crab and lobster pots in the northeast:

http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s...ion-13936.html

He reported some parasitic drag from it. Dragging sea weed on the grating might be another issue. Guess a shaft mounted line cutter is the best approach. Certainly don't plan to intentionally run over crab or lobster pots but my previous experience on the Indian River is they are hard to avoid if you go out of the channel even a small amount.


That would be my cage. As to prop walk effect, never had much to begin with, so the effect is negligible. Besides, have both a bow and stern thruster. :)

No growth at all on the cage (in these northern waters) since I prepped the SS of the cage per Pettit's instructions and then anti-foul painted it.

Yes, some drag with a minor negative effect on fuel burn at normal cruise. And some cavitation noise if I try to push the revs up beyond a couple of hundred over normal cruise.

But it sure is nice, and gives great peace of mind, to be able to steer a straight line through the local "mine fields" of lobster pot buoys. If you haven't been to Downeast Maine, you would have no idea of, and would be amazed at, the density of these buoys.

Just have to be careful backing up.

twistedtree 12-04-2014 06:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RT Firefly (Post 288615)
Greetings,
Mr. tt. I would think the rudder would be more effective being directly in line with a "contained" discharge from the prop "tunnel"...no?


Yes, when the props are thrusting, i suppose that would be true. But under any sort of glide?

Wayfarer 12-05-2014 11:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by twistedtree (Post 288619)
Yes, when the props are thrusting, i suppose that would be true. But under any sort of glide?

On the opposite side of that coin, she might have better directional stability. Steering a straight line for long periods would be easier for the helmsman or autopilot.


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