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Fish Catcher Jim 09-23-2014 12:44 AM

Lord Nelson Tugs
 
First things first. Anyone familiar with these tugs? If so what do you think of them and what is thier reputation liike? Learning all I can so we can make the correct choice of vessle for our needs. I will post more questions that i have about tugs and such next but for now here is a link to one of the tugs i have been checking out.
Thank You
Jim


Lord Nelson Victory Tug 37 boat for sale in La Conner - On Trawler Row United States - Ref: 78613 - YachtWorld.com Mobile

Conrad 09-23-2014 02:04 AM

No direct experience, but have admired their looks for years.

This should keep you occupied for a while:

Tug Fleet by Boat Name and Hull Number - Lord Nelson Victory Tug (LNVT)

Fish Catcher Jim 09-23-2014 02:18 AM

Conrad
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Conrad (Post 270006)
No direct experience, but have admired their looks for years.

This should keep you occupied for a while:

Tug Fleet by Boat Name and Hull Number - Lord Nelson Victory Tug (LNVT)

:dance:
Ohhhh Yea this sure will and I thank you very much.
Have a great week
Jim

djmarchand 09-23-2014 09:04 AM

I have admired, closely inspected and buddy boated with a Lord Nelson from the Bahamas to Florida and north. I also saw your post on the downeaster forum. This trawler forum seems a better place to answer your questions.

You first have to decide on some basics: flybridge or not, displacement cruiser or semi-displacement with go fast capabilities. The downeaster crowd is mostly go fast and non flybridge oriented. Nothing wrong with that and you can go as slow as you want even if you have a lot of horsepower on tap.

But back to the Lord Nelson. It is a very well built, slow- about 7 kts, displacement cruiser. I think that the interior layout is perfect for a boat of that size. The only complaint is that the engine compartment is in forward of and below the galley and is reached by a narrow door to the side. It makes the engine room a bit cramped as I recall. The advantage is that it places the engine well forward in the deepest part of the hull, so the prop shaft angle is reduced.

This boat was delivered with a number of engines, probably the most with the Cummins 4BT 4 cylinder. That engine is rock solid but as an unbalanced 4 cylinder will be rough at low rpms. It should push that boat to displacement speed easily.

Seems like I recall one that had been repowered with the John Deere 4045 which is also a 4 cylinder but has a balance shaft to make it smoother. Also a very good engine for that boat.

Avoid the 6 cylinder BMW engine.

So I like it a lot. But they are not cheap for an older boat which reflects the quality as built new and its endearing popularity. The closest modern competitor is the Nordic Tug 37 but at double the price.

David

Fish Catcher Jim 09-24-2014 01:01 AM

David
 
Once again I say thank you for your time and wisdom.
I kind of figured my post in the DE might get some slack but I figured it would bring options or other boats that might fit my needs as well as the lord nelson or any tug.

Ok my lack of knowledge on these tugs leaves me with so many questions.
How did the tug handle the water from the bahama's?
I know they cruise around quite well and can be very family friendly especially for two, however i have no idea what kind of water or conditions these thngs can handle or even keep safe way around other boats if it got rough.

I do not want to sink time and money into something that will not meet my needs.
This is why i am here and asking all these questions. All the living quarter space and wood tend to draw me but pretty and spacious does notalways get the job done.
Thanks again
Jim

djmarchand 09-24-2014 05:55 AM

We had an almost flat water crossing from the Bahamas West End to Ft Pierce so I can't really say from experience how it handled.

But from looking at the hull shape I think it will be as good as any trawler in heavy seas. May be a little rolly due to lack of hard chines.

David

Grae 07-23-2015 08:02 PM

On the subject of Lord Nelson Tugs:
Does anyone with a knowledge of Lord Nelson Tugs know what happened to LNT 41 hull numbers 3 & 4 which were apparently sold as hull only? Alternatively the fate of the hull mould?
Hopefully this is the right place to ask this.
Thanks, Grae.

Nomad Willy 07-23-2015 08:43 PM

One thing hard to overlook is that this is one of very few full displacement trawlers on the market. And when I was shopping (about 4 years ago) I looked at Victory Tugs. Didn't like any of the engines I found but I considered the boats rather cheap. In price that is. Some were close to $100K.

I didn't think the hull was perfect but obviously it is very efficient. Didn't like the extremely sloped fwd deck. I was still looking though so I appearently thought they were desirable. Didn't know there were a high quality build at the time.

A similar and better boat may be the Pilgrim 40.

Al 07-24-2015 12:38 AM

AaaaaaHa Eric, If the Lord Nelson is FD then I rest my case for the Marben being a FD. A great day in fact!!

I lust for a 37 Lord Nelson. When they come through Ketchikan or pass in travel, I tear up. They are the antipathy of a pleasure version of a commercial old timer,

To those who own one, you are to be congratulated on a wise choice of boat.
Al

Peter B 07-24-2015 12:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Al (Post 351563)
AaaaaaHa Eric, If the Lord Nelson is FD then I rest my case for the Marben being a FD. A great day in fact!!

I lust for a 37 Lord Nelson. When they come through Ketchikan or pass in travel, I tear up. They are the antipathy of a pleasure version of a commercial old timer,

To those who own one, you are to be congratulated on a wise choice of boat.
Al

Aaaahh....I think you mean epitome, Al. Antipathy means the opposite, sort of...but yes, we get your drift...sorry to be a PITA...

Epitome | Define Epitome at Dictionary.com

antipathy - Dictionary Definition : Vocabulary.com

Marin 07-24-2015 01:23 AM

The 37' Victory Tug is, in our opinion, one of the best looking production diesel cruisers of all time. They are the boat that first got my wife and I thinking about augmenting our flying the Inside Passage with cruising it on the water.

At the time even used Victory Tugs were very expensive and the older ones use BMW engines which, we were told by people who had them, are not an ideal powerplant for several reasons. Later Victory Tugs use Cummins engines and that would be the better way to go.

There are a fair number of them in this area.

Donsan 07-24-2015 06:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Marin (Post 351571)
At the time even used Victory Tugs were very expensive and the older ones use BMW engines which, we were told by people who had them, are not an ideal powerplant for several reasons. Later Victory Tugs use Cummins engines and that would be the better way to go.

Besides getting parts, what are the issues with BMW diesel engines? Is this a boatdiesel.com question?

healhustler 07-24-2015 11:45 AM

2 Attachment(s)
During the six months I was on the hard over in Indiantown, FL, this 37 was parked next to me. Needed a lot of wood and deck work, but what style. Anchor hause too.

Al 08-02-2015 10:25 PM

Out of curiosity, Has any Lord Nelson owner have experience in removal of engine replacement. What is the procedure of engine removal? Out the galley, up the topside or in bits and pieces?
It seemed the engine room area is extremely tight from memory of last visting on a passing through Nelson.

Al

Wayfarer 08-03-2015 12:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Conrad (Post 270006)

Quote:

Originally Posted by healhustler (Post 351670)
During the six months I was on the hard over in Indiantown, FL, this 37 was parked next to me. Needed a lot of wood and deck work, but what style. Anchor hause too.

Between these two posts I was able to get to the bottom of a mystery boat I'd been curious about for a couple of years. I run in the Saginaw River probably 50 times a year, and kept catching glimpses of a salty looking tug's hind quarters nestled between some trees in a marina. I was able to decipher the name, but couldn't figure out what kind of boat she was. Now I know, she's Tugboat Annie, a LNVT. I can finally sleep.

Manly Q. 08-03-2015 05:57 AM

Al.

I was looking on the L N V T web page the other day and they said that were designed so that the engine / engines could be removed without and need for dismantling any part of the superstructure / house.

Apparently the hatchs in the house and roof top line up so to make removal easy.

This it seems was a design requirment at the time they were conceived. Pity all boats are built this way. Their web page lists every vessel built and info on whether it is for sale or not.

Regards.

David.

Al 08-04-2015 09:35 PM

Manly O-
Thanks, Smart move if that is the case. Monk designed that feature into our Marben. With a huge amount of glass in the windows all around the cabin and poor air conditioning in the late 70's Monk designed a hatch on top of the house that is directly over with the engine hatch below and same dimensions.It serves two purpose. Straight shot in and out. We recently utilized this option and it was a sweet piece of engine replacement. Thanks again-Al

Moonfish 08-04-2015 09:56 PM

Our not-very-big Port Townsend Yacht Club (about 100 member families) has FOUR Lord Nelson Victory Tugs. IIRC they only built around 40 of them? So having 10% in our yacht club is pretty cool. And yes, they are very cool looking boats!

Britannia 08-04-2015 11:42 PM

They're certainly fine looking vessels. I was quite interested in them for a while. There's one in my marina - I think it may be a 41' version though not sure.

I'm surprised Marin hasn't commented on the fact they're not Tugs. :hide:

Richard

Marin 08-05-2015 02:04 AM

You can pull or push another vessel or a barge with a Victory Tug. So if you do that, it's a tug.

There were 75 36'-11" VTs made, 3 40'-11" VTs made and 8 48'-10" VTs made.

Lord Nelson Yachts was based in Seattle, which explains why a good number of the boats live in these waters. First delivery was in 1983 and the last in 1997.


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